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Posted: 3/25/2006 4:32:45 PM EDT
I get free wifi where I live and I can repair my connection and change my IP at will. Does my wifi provider have an unlimited supply of random IPs or does it recycle them?

Please explain IPs to me.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:34:44 PM EDT
Tag.....cause I don't understand the whole IP thing myself.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:38:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:
Tag.....cause I don't understand the whole IP thing myself.



Me too.



___________________________________



Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:41:04 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 4:49:39 PM EDT by Jetlag]
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.

edit, little more:
Every computer on the internet uses an IP address. The address is four eight 8-bit numbers usually written seperated by dots. When your computer sends information to another computer it uses that computer's specific IP address. When another computer send info to your computer they put your IP address on the packet. Information is sent back and forth in packets, similar to letters in the post office. You can get a static IP address where it is always the same numbers which ISPs like to charge for, or you can get a dynamic IP address where it always changes which is what a lot of end users get because it's dead simple to set up. That's pretty simplified.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:41:32 PM EDT
I'm in for some IP enlightenment
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:44:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



So they recycle? There can be an unlimited number of users on this network.(in theory)

I guess my question is: At any time can I have the same IP address as a previous time I logged on?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:48:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



+1

The ISP has to apply for a whole block of IPs and they just hand out available IPs to you. IPs are generally registered to you for a certain predefined time limit (and should you still be 'using' that IP at the time that limit runs out you get reissued it first). If you keep doing it eventually you'll get the same one back again.

I know this because I once used all the unused IP's my ISP had in a matter of maybe 15 min because I kept getting banned on a gamming server (hehehehe). It's very easy to get new IPs on any connection really- just release the IP, change the MAC address on the computer/router that is getting the IP (some modems need to have their power cycled(turned off and back on) some don't) and you get a new ip.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:50:04 PM EDT
You need to find the antenna and aim it at the drop yard
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:50:05 PM EDT
It looks like you are having withdrawls from that Corvette forum!



I hope you get back in soon.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:52:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By clement:

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



+1

The ISP has to apply for a whole block of IPs and they just hand out available IPs to you. IPs are generally registered to you for a certain predefined time limit (and should you still be 'using' that IP at the time that limit runs out you get reissued it first). If you keep doing it eventually you'll get the same one back again.

I know this because I once used all the unused IP's my ISP had in a matter of maybe 15 min because I kept getting banned on a gamming server (hehehehe). It's very easy to get new IPs on any connection really- just release the IP, change the MAC address on the computer/router that is getting the IP (some modems need to have their power cycled(turned off and back on) some don't) and you get a new ip.



OK...explain to me then how places like this place cn ban IP's for life if you change your IP?
<not planning on getting banned, just cannot understand it...>
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:53:19 PM EDT
DHCP (dynamic host configuration protocol) is used virtually everywhere. The idea behind the protocol is to create a group (called a scope) of addresses for a given subnet (virtual network) to be assigned automatically when a host connects and requests an address. The address pools are not unlimited in size but depending on the administrators and the subnet mask assigned, can vary in size. Every network card (physical or wireless) is uniquely identified by a MAC (media access control) address. The DHCP server will usually try to associate the same IP address with the same MAC address. Depending on the size of the address scope and the number of hosts accessing the network, you may, or may not renew the same address when you access the network.

Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:54:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By clement:

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



+1

The ISP has to apply for a whole block of IPs and they just hand out available IPs to you. IPs are generally registered to you for a certain predefined time limit (and should you still be 'using' that IP at the time that limit runs out you get reissued it first). If you keep doing it eventually you'll get the same one back again.

I know this because I once used all the unused IP's my ISP had in a matter of maybe 15 min because I kept getting banned on a gamming server (hehehehe). It's very easy to get new IPs on any connection really- just release the IP, change the MAC address on the computer/router that is getting the IP (some modems need to have their power cycled(turned off and back on) some don't) and you get a new ip.



Ok explain how an ISP has a whole block of IP's and I read about mods here banning IP's.

Then I read how a mod/staff will say "that IP is from Washington"

Or am I misunderstanding them.

When they lock someone don't they lock the IP?

Hey....I'm a dumbass
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:59:23 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 4:59:58 PM EDT by PlaymoreMinds]

Originally Posted By krpind:


Ok explain how an ISP has a whole block of IP's and I read about mods here banning IP's.

Then I read how a mod/staff will say "that IP is from Washington"

Or am I misunderstanding them.

When they lock someone don't they lock the IP?

Hey....I'm a dumbass



That I get...you can trace the PINGS that an IP makes thru different servers with online programs (Norton has one ) to see who's been trying to say, tickle your ports
But like you, I don't get the "banning of an IP Addy (see my post 2-3 spaces above)
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 4:59:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 5:01:04 PM EDT by The_Friendly_Sponge]

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By clement:

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



+1

The ISP has to apply for a whole block of IPs and they just hand out available IPs to you. IPs are generally registered to you for a certain predefined time limit (and should you still be 'using' that IP at the time that limit runs out you get reissued it first). If you keep doing it eventually you'll get the same one back again.

I know this because I once used all the unused IP's my ISP had in a matter of maybe 15 min because I kept getting banned on a gamming server (hehehehe). It's very easy to get new IPs on any connection really- just release the IP, change the MAC address on the computer/router that is getting the IP (some modems need to have their power cycled(turned off and back on) some don't) and you get a new ip.



Ok explain how an ISP has a whole block of IP's and I read about mods here banning IP's.

Then I read how a mod/staff will say "that IP is from Washington"

Or am I misunderstanding them.

When they lock someone don't they lock the IP?

Hey....I'm a dumbass




The IP protocol includes some basic tools like "ping" and "traceroute." If you know an IP address, it's a simple matter to go to a command prompt and type "tracert x.x.x.x" (x's represent an IP address) and see where the address originates.

As to whether the mods are banning IP addresses or accounts, I couldn't say.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:02:49 PM EDT

Originally Posted By The_Friendly_Sponge:

Originally Posted By krpind:

Originally Posted By clement:

Originally Posted By Jetlag:
They have a pool of IPs that are handed out when users connect to the network. Kinda like the pile of guest IDs at the hospital.



+1

The ISP has to apply for a whole block of IPs and they just hand out available IPs to you. IPs are generally registered to you for a certain predefined time limit (and should you still be 'using' that IP at the time that limit runs out you get reissued it first). If you keep doing it eventually you'll get the same one back again.

I know this because I once used all the unused IP's my ISP had in a matter of maybe 15 min because I kept getting banned on a gamming server (hehehehe). It's very easy to get new IPs on any connection really- just release the IP, change the MAC address on the computer/router that is getting the IP (some modems need to have their power cycled(turned off and back on) some don't) and you get a new ip.



Ok explain how an ISP has a whole block of IP's and I read about mods here banning IP's.

Then I read how a mod/staff will say "that IP is from Washington"

Or am I misunderstanding them.

When they lock someone don't they lock the IP?

Hey....I'm a dumbass




The IP protocol includes some basic tools like "ping" and "traceroute." If you know an IP address, it's a simple matter to go to a command prompt and type "tracert x.x.x.x" (x's represent an IP address) and see where the address originates.

As to whether the mods are banning IP addresses or accounts, I couldn't say.



Both, IIRC. I've seen somebody mention the use of ACLs, which would effectively ban an IP or range of IPs.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:06:04 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Roadhawk:
It looks like you are having withdrawls from that Corvette forum!



I hope you get back in soon.



No, I'm back in.

I'm just curious about IPs is all.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:07:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jason99xj:
Both, IIRC. I've seen somebody mention the use of ACLs, which would effectively ban an IP or range of IPs.



Absolutely.

ACLs (access control lists) can even be used to limit ports (i.e., services and applications) within a particular address or range of addresses.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:08:07 PM EDT
BTW, Captainpooby, have I ever mentioned how much I appreciate your avatar?
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:08:37 PM EDT

Originally Posted By captainpooby:
So they recycle? There can be an unlimited number of users on this network.(in theory)

I guess my question is: At any time can I have the same IP address as a previous time I logged on?



There is always a limit on the number of users using a network at any given time. This is strictly limited by the lesser of the wireless router's built in limit and the amount of IPs it has to hand out.

The pool your drawing from could be hundreds or thousands of IPs. But if there's 100 IPs and you connect 200 times you obviously used at least one more than once. But there is no guarantee you'll ever get a specific IP (even once) because it's possible it could always be in use when you go to connect.

If you want a static IP, meaning it's always the same, you could request one from your ISP. They'll probably make you pay, and/or upgrade your account.

A lot places set up private networks which are connected to the internet through a single IP address. These networks use private IP addresses that are readdressed at the internet connection through a process called Network Address Translation (NAT). This can screw with programs that require your computer to accept connections but it mostly works. A private IP address would look like 10.*.*.* or 172.16-31.*.* or 192.168.*.* (* being any number).

I'm sure I'm explaining this a lot poorer than any of a hundred dozen internet references.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:08:54 PM EDT
Ok class, time for Networking 101.

The internet runs on an addressing protocol called TCP/IP, which contains, obviously TCP & IP, and some other protocols like Telnet & FTP.

The current iteration of TCP/IP is TCP/IP Version 4. In TCP/IP V4 the address (ex. 192.168.100.100) is actually a 32-bit binary number converted to a easy to read format that is broken down into the following classes.

Class A: 1.0.0.0 to 126.0.0.0
Class B: 128.0.0.0 to 191.255.0.0
Class C: 192.0.0.0 to 223.255.255.0
Class D: 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 Not Used - Multicast Addresses
Class E: 240.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.254 Not Used - Experimental Addresses

An ISP has to apply to a licencing body & request a block of addresses to use so they can hand them out to you when you connect to the internet, but you might not ever get one of these addresses as your ISP might assign you a "Private" IP address & automaticaly translate it to a public IP address when your data goes through their system.

Ok class, confused yet?

Each used class has a range of addresses that are considered "private". This means that all networking appliances (Modems, routers, ect.) will not send any traffic with these addresses out onto the internet. The private ranges for the A, B, & C ranges are:

Class A: 10.0.0.0 to 10.255.255.255 (Max - 16.7 Million Addresses)
Class B: 172.16.0.0 to 172.31.255.255 (Max - 1,048,544 Addresses)
Class C: 192.168.0.0 to 192.168.255.255 (Max - 65,024 Addresses)

These are the addresses that you will recieve depending on how your network or your ISP is configured. There is a protocol called DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) that will go out and look for a DHCP Server & get all of the information that you computer needs to connect to the network like your IP address, DNS servers, Subnet Mask & Default Gateway. If you do a Release & Renew on your network card, you might get a new IP address from the DHCP server & that is why your address is changing.

Ok class, take a break & have a beer. Next time, Networking 201 - Subnetting.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 5:31:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By krpind:


Ok explain how an ISP has a whole block of IP's and I read about mods here banning IP's.

Then I read how a mod/staff will say "that IP is from Washington"

....



ISP's are allocated a number of IP blocks by ARIN (American registry for internet numbers).

When the internet was in it's early stages some of us enterprising individuals and network operators were able to secure a large netblock allocations for FREE, they were basically giving them away.

My company currently "owns" several /8's /14's IPV4's and IPv6.

Personally, I have a /24 registered since '93, legacy IP block meaning I don't pay for anything, it's free for life.

Current law, will only allow you to have your own IP block based on justified need for company/commercial purposes only and you have to pay a yearly fee from $2,500 up to $20,000.

Furthermore, with emerging technologies, we should be closer to fully implementing IPv6 - "infinite" IP addresses without tunneling it.

Have a good day.

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