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Posted: 1/4/2006 1:08:51 PM EDT
I've got enough of the drywall up to start seeing where problems lie. First off, my wall apparently isnt 90 degree straight. The bottom half of the drywall matches up like butter. The top half....Not so much so. I'm wondering if I can fill in the gap with mud. The ruler in the pic doesnt do a good job of showing the true spacing because of the angle of the pic. But it does give you an idea, the gap is pretty good sized.

Also, my doorframe is retardedly close to the wall. Which means getting a piece of drywall in there would be a pain in the ass, although not impossible. Is that what I need to do, cut a piece of drywall and tack it in there or is there some other trick?

Thanks.








Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:12:39 PM EDT
With gaps that big I would cut some strips and stuff them in there and then mud. The mud alone will crack after a couple of years, especially near a high traffic area like a door.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:13:33 PM EDT
They make metal corner beads for inside joints like that, tack it in place and mud over it to blend it in. I think they now make a stick on or mud on version, check your home store.

As for the corner peice, pull that trim off first, get the drywall up against the door frame itself.

It cuts pretty easy, use a metal straightedge and take it slow, deepening and depening as you go. Don't forget to flip it and trim the paper side, too, or it might tear.

Good luck,
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:14:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CITADELGRAD87:
They make metal corner beads for inside joints like that, tack it in place and mud over it to blend it in. I think they now make a stick on or mud on version, check your home store.

As for the corner peice, pull that trim off first, get the drywall up against the door frame itself.

It cuts pretty easy, use a metal straightedge and take it slow, deepening and depening as you go. Don't forget to flip it and trim the paper side, too, or it might tear.

Good luck,



I bought me one of those Dremel attachments to cut drywall.
Little bastard cuts slick as shit, hell thats the funnest part of drywallin.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:15:15 PM EDT
Make or buy a piece of trim to go next to your door. Also put up a door stop so the knob doesn't go through the nice new drywall.

I *think* metal corner pieces are available that you can nail into place and just paint over for the corners. Barring that - mud - but I don't know if you can just slap that much mud in place at once and expect it to dry hard.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:16:32 PM EDT
I would take the trim off the door and then rock it, as for the gap in the corner pick up some quick set mud(powder in a bag, you have to mix it with water), but make sure you clean your tools AS SOON AS YOU ARE DONE WITH IT because it sets up hard as a rock in the time it says on the bag.


If you have any more questions go ahead and IM me (this is what I do for a living)
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:21:14 PM EDT
Do yourself a favor and hire somebody else to do the taping. I attempted to tape a room in my house and spent months sanding it all down.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:26:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CITADELGRAD87:
They make metal corner beads for inside joints like that, tack it in place and mud over it to blend it in. I think they now make a stick on or mud on version, check your home store.

As for the corner peice, pull that trim off first, get the drywall up against the door frame itself.

It cuts pretty easy, use a metal straightedge and take it slow, deepening and depening as you go. Don't forget to flip it and trim the paper side, too, or it might tear.

Good luck,



The stuff for inside corners is more of a tape with metal behind it and you mud it on, I don't like it but I suppose it would work for someone doing their own basement.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:27:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By lu380:
Do yourself a favor and hire somebody else to do the taping. I attempted to tape a room in my house and spent months sanding it all down.



Its all about the orbital.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:29:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By rwinn625:

Originally Posted By CITADELGRAD87:
They make metal corner beads for inside joints like that, tack it in place and mud over it to blend it in. I think they now make a stick on or mud on version, check your home store.

As for the corner peice, pull that trim off first, get the drywall up against the door frame itself.

It cuts pretty easy, use a metal straightedge and take it slow, deepening and depening as you go. Don't forget to flip it and trim the paper side, too, or it might tear.

Good luck,



The stuff for inside corners is more of a tape with metal behind it and you mud it on, I don't like it but I suppose it would work for someone doing their own basement.



So this quickset mud, it covers gaps? I ask because when I first started I put up a sheet on the wall and set it flush to the floor not the top. Dur. So instead of having a small gap on the bottom I could cover with a basebooard I have the gap at the top. Theres wood behind it so its not hanging open to the back side of the wall but if I could just fill it in with thismud instead of taking the drywall off then back on....That would be cool.

Think it would work?
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:38:24 PM EDT
I think it's great you tried to do this yourself, but as you'll learn quick enough hanging and fitting the board tight will save you in the final steps. No house new or old will have perfect corners sheets of drywall need to be trimmed to fit irregular surfaces. Do not attempt to sand out the coats of compund with an electric random orbital sander. You will most likely sand right through the paper face of the drywall and be screwed. You'll need a sanding pole with abrasive sheets made special for it. As the other poster said, remove the door trim and sheetrock behind it. You will likely need to add jamb extensions to the door frame to make it flush with the new drywall. Good luck, you'll need it. Not trying to be an ass here, just take your time and be patient.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:45:26 PM EDT
yes just tape over it after it sets up
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 1:48:48 PM EDT
by the way I am covered in mud and dust right now because I just got done texturing ceilings in a house.

Drywall SUCKS especially when you have do it every day.
Link Posted: 1/4/2006 3:50:02 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/4/2006 3:50:15 PM EDT by heysoos]
I'd recommend using drywall shims to attempt to square up the wall.
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