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Posted: 6/14/2001 8:43:56 PM EDT
I was told on sniper country not to use these in my rifle because they have been know to do something to the barrel. Now I want to know if anyone has had any problem with these. Thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 9:39:57 AM EDT
Ok no one has anything to say about moly ammo
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 11:02:45 AM EDT
I haven't tried them yet but I just bought some Moly coated .308's to try out with my Steyr SBS. They do leave some of the Moly coating in the barrel. It's supposed to make it easier to clean. I guess if you are into long range shooting 600+ yards, you probably don't want to change back and forth between FMJ and Moly coated as the trajectories will vary a bit due to lubricity variations. I've never heard anything about damage just trajectory differences.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 1:15:44 PM EDT
Ok thanks for the help.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 4:58:31 PM EDT
Moly lets you shoot a few more rounds between cleanings and makes it easier to clean when you're ready to clean....that's it. Some claim it makes your barrel last longer. That's crap as most barrel wear is caused by hot burning powder being impinged in the throat area. Moly won't do crap for that.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 5:34:23 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Halfcocked: Moly lets you shoot a few more rounds between cleanings and makes it easier to clean when you're ready to clean....that's it. Some claim it makes your barrel last longer. That's crap as most barrel wear is caused by hot burning powder being impinged in the throat area. Moly won't do crap for that.
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Thermal cycling may have a bit to do with it as well. I exclusively shoot moly bullets in my Remington 700 Sendero. Its in 300Win Mag. Yes, it does help with cleaning but due to reduced friction, less heat is generated. I've had nothing but good luck with the moly. From what i've been hearing the results may vary and its best used for long range applications. Moly will require more powder, if you reload, its benefits are the cleaning and [again, this applies to long range shooting] less engraving of the rifling into the shank of the bullet. Hope this helps!
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 5:41:48 PM EDT
Someone at Thunder Ranch told me that they're concerned that Moly can create sulfuric acid in the barrel by mixing with something (I forgot what) and that this acid would be bad news for your barrel.
Link Posted: 6/15/2001 5:49:01 PM EDT
This is what I read about Moly on Sniper country I have recently had misgivings about shooting moly bullets, and it seems there is growing evidence that these coatings should be avoided. I first had some indication that moly may contribute to bore corrosion in normal chrome-molybednum rifle barrels, when I saw "Varmint Al's" little unscientific test on his web page. He put some moly on a barrel surface, and left it for 24 hrs in a humid state. The barrel surface was slightly etched after only 24 hrs. Now even more troublesome info is surfacing. If you contact Sinclair International to order something ask about their current disposition towards shooting moly or Danzac coated bullets. ( Sinclair is a leading precision shooters' suply store). It is notable that Sinclair sells moly coating products, as well as the Danzac coatings from Kincaid, Inc. At the present time Sinclair is advising people that they are not shooting moly or Danzac anymore in their own rifles, and are waiting for further info on the risks. In the new shooting book written by Sinclair and Gravatt (who run Sinclair Int'l), there is a section on moly coating methods, etc. They say in their book that they cannot recommend using any bullet coatings at this time, and it is quite possible that moly will prove to be only the first generation of bullet coatings. They also relate some of the problems observed with moly use. The most significant and worrisome is that if moly is not completely cleaned out of a bore it builds up on itself....and....that a form of pitting and erosion has been observed underneath moly in *stainless steel* rifle barrels, that is unlike any pitting they have ever previously observed in this type of barrel. For those who haven't shot moly bullets yet, be aware that it is nearly impossible to completely remove it from your barrel. You can get most of it with strong solvents, but bore paste (USP, JB's) will also be required to get nearly all of it out. It is alot of work. If you have already used moly, it is very important that it be removed as best you can after shooting. Do not put up guns which have been shot with moly, before you have given them a very thorough cleaning. The guys I have talked to at Sinclair are now shooting plain old uncoated bullets, and being very careful to clean all the copper fouling out.
Link Posted: 6/16/2001 12:45:53 AM EDT
If I remember correctly this problem may be due to the fact that moly was originally used as a high pressure lubricant. My understanding is that it can be forced into metal surfaces by high pressures. I believe, but am not certain, that this is because the moly is a somewhat hard substance. I guess my analogy would be like taking a bucket of marbles and spreading them out on the surface of a table. Now things will roll easily on top of them but if enough force is exherted against them they won't compress [maybe break eventually] but will cause impressions/indextations in the tables surface. Any other ideas????
Link Posted: 6/16/2001 12:47:45 AM EDT
I forgot to mention. What was said above about cleaning may be true but I always clean my Sendero after shooting it so I haven't seen that problem but don't doubt that it is possible.
Link Posted: 6/16/2001 1:57:06 AM EDT
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