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Posted: 11/25/2003 6:31:22 AM EDT
I am preparing some venison steaks and a venison roast to take to my mom's house for thanksgiving. She is making the traditional turkey and ham but I think this will knock everyone's socks off.

I have never prepared venison so is there anything special to keep in mind when doing so???
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:37:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/25/2003 6:48:38 AM EDT by 8531sgt]
Thinner is better and don't overcook it. It's alot leaner than beef so it's not going to cook the same. Use some oil in the pan, I sometimes put in a little onion & garlic, just a bit & it turns out nicely. Roast, Put some pieces of garlic into little cuts in the roast, all around. Slow cooker, potatoes, onions, carrots, mushroom soup & some water. Come out best if you put the potatoes in after a couple hours and not right away, that way you don't have potatoe mush. Cook until tender. Say grace & enjoy.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:43:25 AM EDT
My cousin told me this. Marinade the venison in Ginger Ale. It doesnt add all the salt meat tenderizer does.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:45:51 AM EDT
We cut it in bite size pieces and chicken fry it. Then dip it in hot cheese sauce. Damn it's good!
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:50:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ilikelegs: We cut it in bite size pieces and chicken fry it. Then dip it in hot cheese sauce. Damn it's good!
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Holy crap, is that what that sound is I hear? Your arteries hardening?
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:56:22 AM EDT
First and most important...remove ALL fat and silver skin from the meat....unlike beef, the fat you find on venison takes away from the flavor of the meat...much better tasting if you remove it prior to cooking. I will often soak the meat overnight in milk...completely cover the meat in milk and make the container as airtight as you can. The milk seems to draw out excess blood that might still be in the meat. The next day you simply remove the meat, pat it dry and you are ready to cook. Like others said, be very careful not to overcook...this is very lean meat....should be served rare to medium rare for best flavor...or if your group is insistent, take it to medium...but no further. For a roast you can cover it with slices of raw bacon and cook...the fat from the bacon helps keep the meat moist. Good luck and good eatin'
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 6:59:56 AM EDT
Nothing is better than the backstrap (loin), seasoned and wrapped in bacon, roasted in a 400F oven until its 160F on the inside. Well, pan fried sliced backstrap is also very good when served with a reduction gravy. Venison tips, sauteed with onion and red bell pepper in a very hot skillet and then make a good gravy with a roux addition is also very tasty. Just remember to preheat the IRON skillet DRY until you get smoke, add 3 tablespoons of peanut oil and immediately add the meat and veggies with black pepper. Cook until you have some "crispie" brown spots, about 4 minutes with a 12" skillet and 1.5 pounds of tips. Add the roux and water and simmer for 15 minutes. Season with salt to taste and serve over rice, noodles or potatoes. Damn, I am hungry now. I ate nothing but venison over the weekend.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 7:01:01 AM EDT
Dang, is that my doppleganger?
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 8:13:42 AM EDT
Do what Keith from NC suggests. Been doin' it that way for years, never had any complaints, even from people that SWORE they'd NEVER eat venison. Of course, I didn't tell them it was venison until after dinner.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 8:25:16 AM EDT
Thin cuts are better. I cook all mine on the grill.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 8:25:28 PM EDT
Ok, so how done is done, I don't want to overcook it. Anyone ever try a long slow cook in a crock pot? It seems like a good idea, what do you guys think?
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 8:29:36 PM EDT
here's a good way to cook veneson, especially gamey venesion: butterfly the tenderloin, then dip the pieces in a scrambled egg, the rolling pin it out in crushed saltein crackers, then fry in butter mmmm, breaded venison filets
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 8:37:27 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 9:14:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/25/2003 9:15:07 PM EDT by RobarSR60]
Originally Posted By lvgunner777: I am preparing some venison steaks and a venison roast to take to my mom's house for thanksgiving. She is making the traditional turkey and ham but I think this will knock everyone's socks off. I have never prepared venison so is there anything special to keep in mind when doing so???
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Forget about it. Don't use your family as guinea pigs. Grind it up, throw in some spices, add a little pork fat from the butcher, and make sausage with it. Use it for the stuffing. I tell ya, they'll never know the difference.
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 9:28:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/25/2003 9:28:54 PM EDT by AZ-K9]
I would caution you on surprising the family with strange meat. (Assuming they havent had it). The gamey taste can be real turn off sometimes. If you must, I'd second the sausage recommendation, or a chili recipe. I made a ton of chili this morning, using 2 pounds of ground venision and about 2 pounds of sirloin tips. Brown both and put into a huge pot, a lil kidney beans, a habanero, japelenos, some anaheims, chili powder, and two or three large cans of crushed tomatoes and tomato sauce. Cook for several hours and wala, excellent venison chili! Makes about 1.5 gallons of chili. (Wife is pissed) My particular deer this year has absolutely ZERO gamey taste to it (quick kill anyone?), but I'm confident if it did, the chili route would either remove it or "cover it". YMMV
Link Posted: 11/25/2003 9:30:18 PM EDT
For me, I just throw it on the grill. A pat of butter, a tad of garlic, and some black pepper on it. Cook rare to medium rare. My neighbor a few years ago in Florida had a wife who HATED venison. All she had ever eaten had been fried well done. I made her eat a bite grilled one day. She wouldn't stay away from it after that. Enjuy!
Link Posted: 11/26/2003 4:23:21 AM EDT
The crock pot is a great way to go. I cook venison stew in mine all the time. First, coat the venison stew meat in flour and brown in butter in a frying pan (cast iron if possible). The proceed to the crock pot like you would beef stew...wonderful. Roast can be done the same way...meat cooks moist and is very tender.
Link Posted: 11/26/2003 4:00:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Keith: The crock pot is a great way to go. I cook venison stew in mine all the time. First, coat the venison stew meat in flour and brown in butter in a frying pan (cast iron if possible). The proceed to the crock pot like you would beef stew...wonderful. Roast can be done the same way...meat cooks moist and is very tender.
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How much water or liquid should go in the crock pot?? I'm a cooking moron so I don't know what the hell I'm doing. By the way, I just took out a venison steak, salt and peppered it, coated it in flour and pan fried it in bubbling hot butter. Man, that was tasty, very tasty!!! I almost don't want to take this stuff over there now it's so good. LOL
Link Posted: 11/26/2003 4:12:11 PM EDT
One of the best tools for preparing venison is a sharp filet knife. It is the best thing to use for getting rid of the membrane, fat, and that silver strip of skin on the backstrap. One method that I have seen used and works very well, is to put a whole hindquarter in a large pan, stab holes in it, pour a can of coca cola over it, add all sorts of spices and seasonings, then cook on low heat for about 5 hours. Makes one of the best roasts I've ever had. Me and a buddy made venison kabobs a few weeks ago. I cleaned the backstrap really well and meticulously trimmed every bit of non-meat material off. Cut it into small cubes. Put them on skewers with venison sausage, bell pepper, onion, and red bell pepper (for color, my buddy said). Turned out DAMN good. Serve with a side of breaded and fried venison strips and cold beer.
Link Posted: 11/26/2003 4:13:05 PM EDT
We pan fry the tenderloins in olive oil with a tiny bit of salt & garlic, and some onions too. Mmmm Mmmm good.
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