Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 4/5/2006 11:33:40 AM EDT
has anyone seen anything that defines how much muscle mass can lift a certain amount of weight. I know in order to test it you would have to use an isolation drill like a preacher curl to get a feel for how much muscle you need by doing “x” amount of work. Then you factor the length of the arm and get your torque ratio. I would think that with few exceptions a human bicep is basically the same from person to person of the same sex and if say 100 people can do “X” lift they should all have close to the same muscle mass. sure it will look different because it’s all on different sized bodies but I would think it should have close to the same mass.

Am I all wet on this?
How many cubic inches of muscle does it take to do 3 sets of 10 dumbbell Preacher curls at say 30#
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 11:53:02 AM EDT
Why dont you just workout?

Link Posted: 4/5/2006 12:01:09 PM EDT
I can't at work. i am working out at home in the evenings.
but up at work i can come up with all sorts of off the wall questions.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 3:18:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hk940:
I can't at work. i am working out at home in the evenings.
but up at work i can come up with all sorts of off the wall questions.




Cool, might wanna give Voldermoron a call while on your lunch break.

Link Posted: 4/5/2006 6:04:47 PM EDT
Cubic inches of muscle? Never heard of that before, but then I don't know shit.
That would be cool. You could say your bicep had .567943 HP.

LOL, if it was a bored and stroked 350 with a blower, then I could ask someone.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:35:49 AM EDT
I think the individuals overall size and weight comes into play if I understand your question. I've noticed over the yrs that small stature guys get bigger faster for some reason, maybe its that they do not have to tear up as much muscle mass to "get big"?
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 9:42:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mags:
I think the individuals overall size and weight comes into play if I understand your question. I've noticed over the yrs that small stature guys get bigger faster for some reason, maybe its that they do not have to tear up as much muscle mass to "get big"?



I always thought they just looked bigger
A guy that is 5’5 that can max out at 200# bench press
Looks like he has more muscle than a guy that is 6’5”.

Just like a short lady with large breasts looks “bigger”
Than a tall lady even though they have the same cup size.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 2:35:13 PM EDT
There are a lot of other factors at play such as muscle efficiency, ratio of slow twitch to fast twitch muscles, etc.

Bodybuilders tend to have greater muscle mass than powerlifters of the same weight, but powerlifters can sling more steel.

Link Posted: 4/6/2006 3:54:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
There are a lot of other factors at play such as muscle efficiency, ratio of slow twitch to fast twitch muscles, etc.

Bodybuilders tend to have greater muscle mass than powerlifters of the same weight, but powerlifters can sling more steel.




why is that?
(I hate typing simple questions I know have complex answers.)
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 3:57:23 PM EDT
Genetics will determine things like fiber types, the neuromuscualr recruitment patterns, the insertion of tendons etc. So no there is no way to measure this not even a little.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 3:59:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hk940:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
There are a lot of other factors at play such as muscle efficiency, ratio of slow twitch to fast twitch muscles, etc.

Bodybuilders tend to have greater muscle mass than powerlifters of the same weight, but powerlifters can sling more steel.




why is that?
(I hate typing simple questions I know have complex answers.)



Bodybiulders do not have the ability to recruit as many fibers in a single all out contraction because they dont train to do that and usually dont have genetics predisposed for that. To a much smaller extent it has to do with fiber type.
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 4:49:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DevL:

Originally Posted By hk940:

Originally Posted By H46Driver:
There are a lot of other factors at play such as muscle efficiency, ratio of slow twitch to fast twitch muscles, etc.

Bodybuilders tend to have greater muscle mass than powerlifters of the same weight, but powerlifters can sling more steel.




why is that?
(I hate typing simple questions I know have complex answers.)



Bodybiulders do not have the ability to recruit as many fibers in a single all out contraction because they dont train to do that and usually dont have genetics predisposed for that. To a much smaller extent it has to do with fiber type.



Agreed. I cant add about 100lbs. to my bench in a short time due to the fact that I am not training for the 1RM. If I switch up my routine to a west side style my lifts skyrocket, but I don't pack on the mass like I do when doing a body building style routine. At 6'6" I have chosen to fill out my frame with muscle and take the strenght as it comes.

Also, DevL I enjoy your posts. You are obviously well read in the ways of fitness.
Top Top