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Link Posted: 9/16/2010 3:18:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2010 3:19:27 AM EDT by OSU_ERIC]
EDIT: I'm an idiot, I got nothing.
Link Posted: 9/16/2010 2:43:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By OSU_ERIC:
EDIT: I'm an idiot, I got nothing.


That is indeed cheap, and knowing when to shut up is damn sure valuable.
You win.
Link Posted: 9/16/2010 4:33:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Infantry26:
Originally Posted By Psamtik:
An old trick is that if you need to carry someone around, you can make the body of a stretcher by taking some durable shirts (think BDU tops) maybe 3 or so if you got em, turn the sleeves inside out, and run long poles through the sleeves.  Keeps the poles nice and separated, keeps the sleeves from getting tangled or in the way.


You can also make an improvised litter by placing a poncho (a tough one like military issue) on the ground putting th two pols evenly spaced over it then folding the flaps over.  The weight of the person on it keeps it folded.  I'll try to steal a photo from another site.

I've carried (along with several other people) a guy that weighed about 230lb who was also wearing full body armor/helmet/weapon, etc in JUST a poncho (no poles that time...like a big sloppy taco).  It is hard to grip but it didn't rip until we skimmed the top of a rock and it cut the material that was under so much tension.


Here is a link
to a site that explains how to do this.
Link Posted: 9/17/2010 7:39:56 AM EDT


You can make a cheap yet light weight frame sheet that can be used with most of the frameless 3 day rucks with  a old closed cell sleep pad, 2 1/8 alum peices of stock and some 3m heavy duty spray adhesive.....





put one in my BHI 3 day and made a world of difference. time was maybe 10-15 minutes...and under 15$ if ya buy it all fresh( sleep pad etc)


Link Posted: 9/17/2010 5:00:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/17/2010 5:09:32 PM EDT by Army_of_One]
I used one of the cheap travel soap holders for my fishing gear.  They will float if knocked in and can be purchased in colors like orange and red for visibility.
Link Posted: 9/20/2010 8:33:08 PM EDT
Large heavy duty zip ties are great for quick and easy shelter building for holding your tree limb shelter poles together. When I insert a flat head or knife point and "unzip" them I always get a "I had no idea" response from at least one person.

If you did not know that zipties can be reused, then you just learned a cheap but valuable trick. You can carry quite a few in even the smallest kit and they weight almost nothing.
Link Posted: 11/18/2010 5:04:19 PM EDT
For a fire starter:

I lit a glow stick, cut the top off, and absorbed the liquid into a paper towel. It burns extremely well, and for a long time. Try it; wear rubber gloves.



sonny



P.S. I'm 12
Link Posted: 11/19/2010 6:52:14 AM EDT

I remember Shoe Goo from the 80's. My dad was a runner and went through tubes of that stuff. I seem to remember them discontinuing it, but I'd love to have some. I'll look for the E6000 stuff too.



I found some at a small mom & pop hardware store last week, so it is still around!
Link Posted: 11/20/2010 8:00:07 AM EDT




Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:





I remember Shoe Goo from the 80's. My dad was a runner and went through tubes of that stuff. I seem to remember them discontinuing it, but I'd love to have some. I'll look for the E6000 stuff too.






I found some at a small mom & pop hardware store last week, so it is still around!


walmart  still has it ( least here)

Link Posted: 11/22/2010 7:25:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Enforcer:
Phil, thanks for letting me post this again. I think it is more appropriate here. I have another ALICE enhancement post that will be geared towards making the ruck more useable without the frame; and will make it very "kid friendly". It should be ready in a couple of days; anyway, here's my "hellcat" hybrid.




Assembling the ALLE Pack "Hellcat": a ALICE/MOLLE hybrid

By Enforcer





This is my version of the ALICE/MOLLE hybrid that I call the ALLE Pack or "Hellcat";  The ALICE/MOLLE systems are inexpensive; plentiful and solid platforms from which to build a hybrid ruck. Hopefully this post will help you assemble a Hellcat without any difficulty or maybe give you some additional ideas on how to develope your own hybrid.

The Hellcat has between 3500 ci (calculated by dimension) and 4000 ci (measured) capacity (4000 ci and above are generally considered an expedition class pack). Adding the MOLLE sustainment pouches will add an additional 1000 ci of capacity and using the the large ALICE ruck will give a potential 7500- 8000 ci capacity. The Hellcat in it's described form is a legitimate expedition pack before the additions are added; all for far less money than you will pay for any commercial pack.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/alle3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/alle2.jpg



Lets first start with all the components needed to assemble the Hellcat.

1. ALICE frame and medium ruck
2. one set MOLLE shoulder straps
3. one MOLLE moulded kidney belt
4. one MOLLE sleep system carrier

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hccomponents.jpg


All of these items can be purchased for between $50-$70; even less if you shop around.



STEP 1: Inspecting and attaching medium ALICE ruck to the frame



Inspect the frame for cracks and loose rivets; rivets should be tight as well as the joined parts; repair or replace the frame if it is damaged.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe2.jpg

Slip the medium ruck over the frame

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe3.jpg

Loosen the bottom attachment straps on the ruck and slip the strap through the triangular holes created by kidney brace at the bottom of the frame. DON"T OVER TIGHTEN at this point. You want some play so the ruck can expand properly while loading. Once your pack is loaded then these straps can be tightened.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe6.jpg



STEP 2: Preparing the MOLLE Shoulder straps


First start by removing the short attachment strap at the top of the shoulder straps(they are attached to the load lifter straps); once both are removed set them aside; keep up with them because you will need them in a few minutes.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle2.jpg

Next inspect and prepare the flat "yoke" portion of the MOLLE straps. There is a long wide strap tacked in the center with a large fastex buckle under neath it; separate the two if they have been fastened together. next you will notice two sets of attachment straps running parallel to the yoke. Leave the straps in the buckles of the top set(you will not need these) but loosen and remove the straps from the bottom set on both sides.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle5.jpg


Next, fold the long center strap up  so that it falls over the top of the shoulder straps.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle7.jpg


Don't worry about the top set of attachment straps; we'll fold those over and tuck them later in the assembly


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/molle8.jpg



STEP 3: Attaching the MOLLE shoulder straps


Lay the pack down and place the prepped shoulder straps in this approximate position; keeping them centered with the long center strap protruding from the top

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap.jpg

next take the short attachment straps that you had set aside and slip into the fastex buckle from the top . This the same buckle you  just removed them from.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap2.jpg

it should look like this when you are done

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap3.jpg

Now you are going to slip the end of this strap under the top of the frame and thru the slot; then it will go thru the small d ring attachment on the alice ruck

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap7.jpg

Now slip it back thru the buckle and back thru again...snugging it down. It should look like this when you are finished. Repeat the process for the other shoulder strap.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap9.jpg


Now we begin attaching the long center strap; pull it over the top of the frame and push or tuck the strap  down between the frame and the ruck


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap10.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap11.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap12.jpg


Once you have the strap tucked, lay the pack down so the underside of the frame is exposed


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap13.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap14.jpg


This in my opinion is where the MOLLE shoulder straps really show their worth; you can now adjust for torso fit/length. Something you could never do with issue straps or after market enhancements. In the pics above I have shown you can have as much as 5 inches of adjustment; so realistically you can adjust for about 15-20 inches of torso length. For now we will go ahead and secure the straps and adjust for torso fit later.

Adjust the straps so that they are a couple of inches below the top of the frame; as illustrated in the last pic above. Next wrap the strap around the center cross members as shown in the next pics. You can wrap several times but once is enough, this will make torso fit a little easier.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap15.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap16.jpg


Flip up the yoke of the MOLLE straps and feed the long strap thru the buckle and tighten securely.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap17.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap18.jpg


Attach the side bottom strap as shown; looping it around the frame and threading thru the buckle; snug down; then do the other side; adjusting so it is centered. Fold and tuck the loose ends.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap19.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap20.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap23.jpg


Separate  the lower portion of the shoulder straps using the quick release mechanism (be carefull at this point; IMO the quick release is the weakest link in the MOLLE system and can be broken if forced open). Once released take the loop end and feed thru the round hole on the bottom of the frame; feed from outside to inside. Slip the QR end thru the loop and tighten.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap21.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sstrap22.jpg



Reattach the QR end back to the shoulder straps and you are done with attaching the MOLLE straps


STEP 4: Attaching the MOLLE kidney belt


First, place the kidney pad as shown to ready it for attachment. THIS IS THE CORRECT POSITION. The hump should go down.  Install this pad upside down and you'll kick the Hellcat to the curb like I almost did two years ago. I put it on upside down because it looked like it belonged that way. Nevermind that I could clearly see the MOLLE assembly instructions show the hump goes down. I paid for that bit of arrogance with two bleeding blisters the size of my hand on each side of my butt.  Again "HUMP GOES DOWN".


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/kidney1.jpg


next, flip it over to one side and feed the straps thru the metal slot and attach to the buckles; snug the straps down


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/kidney2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/kidney3.jpg


Flip the belt back over and feed the straps thru the other side; attach to the buckles and snug down.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/kidney4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/kidney5.jpg


Do not tighten so hard that you deform the belt. There is going to be some play;  but under load this has never been a problem. You are now finished attaching the MOLLE kidney belt.



STEP 5: Attaching the MOLLE sleep system carrier


We are now on the last leg to assembling the Hellcat; first thing to do is stuff a pillow into the ruck so as to give it some shape and offer some resistance while attaching the sleep system. You may want to give the carrier some bulk as well; but this step is optional.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep1.jpg


after you have cinched the top of the ruck, lay it down so that you can see the bottom and the two lashing loops; these will be the primary points of attachment to the ruck.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep2.jpg


next, disconnect the fastex QR buckles on the sleep carrier; remove the male end from the straps and set aside. You will also want to slide the elastic keepers off as well.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep3.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep5.jpg


Next you'll slide the cinch straps out of all the their respective "strap loops"; three on each side untill your carrier looks like this; this is the top view of the carrier.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep6.jpg


As a point of reference; the lashing loops of the ruck will set between the carrier handle and the rear top strap loops


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep7.jpg


Slide the cinch straps thru the rucks lashing loops and then thru the top rear strap loops of the carrier


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep9.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep10.jpg


The sleep system carrier is now attached to the bottom of the ruck; but it's not stable at this point. We now attach it to the frame by running both cinch straps up the back of the ruck and over the cross support of the frame


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep11.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep12.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep16.jpg


Once you are over the cross support bring the cinch straps down; threading them thru the slots at the bottom of the frame; feed them through the flat side and exit the channel side. Snug them down securely


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep13.jpg


the straps will now wrap around the bottom of the frame, ready to be threaded thru the second set of strap loops


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep14.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep15.jpg


Once you've threaded them; snug them up to the frame and thread the cinch straps thru the bottom front strap loops; reattach the male ends of the fastex buckles and slide the elastic keepers back on. I kept mine off.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep17.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/sleep18.jpg


Now your Hellcat is ready for business; you should have a pack that looks just like one of these


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/alle1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/alle2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/alle3.jpg


Hopefully this wasn't too confusing; like any system not all of these may work for you. I have found this particular hybrid to be very forgiving and rock solid; but it's only as good as the person putting it together. Assemble it using the ALICE and MOLLE parts properly and the Hellcat should take you there and back.

Enforcer



Torso Fit and Pack Adjustment Guide


As promised here is a guide for proper torso fit and pack adjustment. Once you have familiarized your self with torso fit and adjustment guides you will find the Hellcat has ALL the modern adjustments that are common on todays commercial packs. First read these links to REI's backpack adjustment guides

Finding Your Torso and Hip Size

Adjusting the Fit


Points of reference for torso adjustment should be the notch ( C-7 ) at the top of the shoulder pads and the midpoint of the hip pad( line of iliac crest). Remember these are just references; but I believe they will get you in the right ball park.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit1.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit3.jpg


Loosen the side and torso attachment straps...you don't have to remove them.....measure your torso length; move the shoulder straps up or down accordingly and retighten the attachment straps. EDIT I have another comment here and I have added a couple of more pics. You must also loosen the load lifters significantly for torso fit. I just recently fit my 10 yo (Webelo II) and his torso length was 14 inches. No surprise it worked fantastic. The bonus for him was we were able to use the second set of side attachment straps and the load sets higher for better balance. The beauty is this adjustment can be reset as he matures, giving him use of the pack well into his adulthood(the Hellcat will probably outlast him)


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit5.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit6.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/torso2.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/torso1.jpg


You should now be fitted for torso length. Readjust load lifters; sternum strap; hip belt and tweak lower adjustment on shoulder strap per the REI guide. The next two pics show the difference in height of shoulder straps and load lifter straps. The top pick is mine set at a torso length of 18 inches; the bottom pic is of my 10 yo's set at o torso length of 14 inches.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/torso4.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/torso3.jpg



In case you didn't know these are the parts refered to in the REI article "adjusting the fit"


Load Lifters

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit7.jpg


Sternum strap

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit11.jpg


Shoulder strap adjustment

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit10.jpg


Stabilizer strap.... notice it is not on the kidney belt.... it's the strap I told you not to tighten until the ruck was loaded

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit8.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcframe6.jpg


Quick release... most of us will never use this other than for convenience during assembly/disassembly

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v87/caneyforkoutfitters/hcfit9.jpg

Now you have it; all the tools for proper fit and load stabilization of your Hellcat.


Enforcer






Nice setup. One thing to consider is that the rivets are good now but they WILL fail. Its a matter of when not if. I always drill em out and use a hardened machine screw with a pan head, nylon locking nut and super glue on the threads. There is absolutely nothing worse then the rivet popping lose or breaking right before a 20K plus movement, trust me it aint fun.
Link Posted: 11/22/2010 7:28:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/22/2010 7:29:48 PM EDT by jungryfairy]
Originally Posted By raf:
One thing that the ALICE pack lacks is compression straps.  We all start out with a pack more-or-less full, but as time goes by, the food contents get used up, and the pack gets a bit sloppy, with adverse impact on the user's balance. For you tactical types, subtract ammo used, and the effect is even more pronounced.

The solution is simple.  Examine the ALICE pack closely, and you will see sewn-on webbing on the sides that will easily accept 1" horizontal straps that wrap around the body of the pack, and will serve to compress the back into a stable, compact, non-shifting unit.  A closer examination will show that the straps on the pockets––not the pocket flaps–– have a space behind them so the user can put his finger beneath the snaps to press the halves of the snaps together.  By happy coincidence, this space behind the webbing on the pocket will allow a 1" strap to be threaded through all the pockets, serving as an additional compression strap.

Between the original tunnels on the ALICE, and the pocket closure tunnels, the user should be able to install a sufficient amount of horizontal compression straps to accomodate most any need.  Vertical compression can be done via use of the existing top flap straps.

Now you're asking where to get the straps.  All right, go here: http://www.sportsmansguide.com/net/cb/20-new-swiss-military-web-straps-olive-drab.aspx?a=561508 for Swiss OD adjustable, QD straps, which are perfect for this application.  Be advised that the fastex-style QD buckles will NOT mate to most US-available genuine fastex (or close foreign copy) buckles, but for a stand-alone use, such as compression straps, this matters little.

There is plenty of life in a good condition ALICE pack.  You all update the green tick as enforcer suggests, and you'll have the equal of packs costing many hundreds of dollars more.


To counter this use OD green bungees (laced through the back they add sweet padding plus they are a great item to have on hand) and hook em through the frame around the back of the pack and hook on the opposite frame. I have done this to secure 5 gal water cans from bouncing while moving em.


Link Posted: 11/28/2010 9:23:19 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JoinTheRukus:
Rather than lugging around a big clunky roll of duct tape:

Take a business card or something of similar size and wrap a few feet of duct tape lengthwise around the card. This will keep your tape relatively compact but still readily accessible.

Alternatively if you use something like an old hotel key or one of those fake credit card type of plastic cards you can wrap a few feet around it width wise (perpendicular to the long axis), punch a hole in the exposed plastic part and attach to a key ring or zipper pull etc.

This has worked for me with regular duct tape, but I have heard of issues with the stronger "gorilla tape" types that end up being a mass of useless tape after some time.


Or try wrapping it around a ball point pen of some kind.
Link Posted: 12/4/2010 2:14:01 PM EDT
fast and effective wick : lamenated paper. like the thicker junk mail we all get almost each day, say like those glossy 6x10 or so cards politicians send out. can even take a can,put a 1/4" of almost any oil in, lite a piece of the stuff and gently put it in the oil, and viola, makeshift oil burning wick lamp. works in candles that the wick has burned too far to get at too.
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 11:30:24 AM EDT
Tagged -

Some great info guys!
Link Posted: 12/29/2010 5:41:06 PM EDT
For easy, portable firestarters, here's what I keep with me.
Get a can of Altoids. once the mints are gone, get a cheap votary candle from walmart ( I use the regligous ones because they are like $.50 for a large one). heat the candle in a pot of boiling water till the wax is melted. pull the wick out, and then pour wax into the altoids tin. cut the wick into several 4 pieces and stick them in a staggering pattern in the can.
This can be used for light, for starting a fire (put the can at the base of a tepee of twigs, once they start burning, pull the can out with another stick. Use it over and over) it's also able to heat your hands up quickly.

You can also use a candle warmer to melt a big can of sterno down and put it in the altoids tin, so that you can can have a more portable, adn easier to use, cooking fuel than comes in a can of sterno.
Link Posted: 12/30/2010 1:55:33 PM EDT
Keep a lot of sandpaper around. Great for sharpening knives, polishing stuff, scouring pots, etc. keep grits 20, 100,220, 1000, 2000, and 8000
Learn Morse code. Make a gong with a metal trashcan lid. Use Morse code and predetermined combos to communicate with nearby neighbors (assuming the sound is tolerable to other neighbors) and your watchmen/security guards/patrol. You can also use a 55 gallon drum, or even a paintcan.
Old, worn out knives can be made into chisels or flathead screwdrivers without much effort with a set of files. This goes in reverse, if you have a forge.
It ain't cheap at first, but have a gargantuan selection of tools. It will save you money in the end. Do as much around the house as you can (plumbing, additions, remodeling, etc.).
A garden.
Big library. Plenty of books on DIY stuff. Even if you don't do the stuff, you know how to, and can get the stuff to do it together eventually.
Link Posted: 12/30/2010 5:36:05 PM EDT
simple cheap paracord king cobra wrap for handle on alice pack. has been very useful

Link Posted: 1/27/2011 8:02:06 AM EDT
Here's a goody:

Ever had a crack forming in a piece of plastic, say, your Kydex holster? You can try to glue it but it probably won't help.

What you need to do is drill a small hole in the very end of the crack, where it is just starting to separate the plastic. This stops the crack from spreading by spreading the point of failure –– the place where the crack starts–– over a wide area instead of a point area.
Link Posted: 3/13/2011 1:43:12 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Army_of_One:
I used one of the cheap travel soap holders for my fishing gear.  They will float if knocked in and can be purchased in colors like orange and red for visibility.
http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff141/ZX2_R/Vault/IMG_1403.jpg


I saw this and immediately ran to the store for a .98 soap holder. I had everything else at the house. It frees up more room in my BOB.
Link Posted: 3/17/2011 1:57:29 AM EDT
Okay, time to kick-start this thread.

Here's a woodworking technique that many people don't know about. Steam bending wood has been practiced for centuries. My dad made some fascinating wood parts from time to time using this technique.

Steam bending wood.

You can get some crazy angles if you do it correctly!

Another example of steam-bent wood:

Link Posted: 3/18/2011 7:16:55 PM EDT
One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.
Link Posted: 3/19/2011 12:36:23 AM EDT




Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:

Okay, time to kick-start this thread.



Here's a woodworking technique that many people don't know about. Steam bending wood has been practiced for centuries. My dad made some fascinating wood parts from time to time using this technique.



Steam bending wood.



You can get some crazy angles if you do it correctly!



Another example of steam-bent wood:



http://www.gartsideboats.com/gallery/4.jpg


How you gonna get that out of your basement, Jethro?

Link Posted: 3/19/2011 1:33:18 AM EDT
Originally Posted By EdHaney1:

Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Okay, time to kick-start this thread.

Here's a woodworking technique that many people don't know about. Steam bending wood has been practiced for centuries. My dad made some fascinating wood parts from time to time using this technique.

Steam bending wood.

You can get some crazy angles if you do it correctly!

Another example of steam-bent wood:

http://www.gartsideboats.com/gallery/4.jpg

How you gonna get that out of your basement, Jethro?


................


damn!
Link Posted: 3/23/2011 1:32:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/13/2011 1:00:24 AM EDT
Link Posted: 4/13/2011 1:26:17 AM EDT



Originally Posted By Keekleberrys:





Originally Posted By Toyforever:

One my grandfather taught me way back when, carry a can of starting fluid in you car/truck. If you are out in the backwoods and hit something hard enough to knock the tire bead off the rim, pull tire lay and lay it on it's side on the ground. Make sure the side touching the ground is on the bead of the rim, pull top side as tight as you can the spray the tire/bead area with starting fluid and light quickly-will heat air in tire and "pop" tire back on bead with a little pressure. You will still have to check air pressure and inflate but this will save some backbraking time and headache trying to reset bead.



Seen this work on the trail before, its a cool trick but you gotto be real quick with the air.  
Its also best to remove the valve core before you light it. Acts as a bleed off valve for the excess pressure. Then re-install and re-inflate.





 
Link Posted: 4/21/2011 5:15:12 PM EDT
The plastic netting around turkey or ham at the grocery store make for a very compact fishing net. Cut off the "handle" and leave the metal clip at the bottom.

A couple of sticks and some well placed rocks turn them into a very handy fish trap.

Link Posted: 5/12/2011 10:23:33 PM EDT
*********************************************­*
Link Posted: 5/14/2011 3:06:24 AM EDT
A quick cure for athlete's foot.  As long as your feet are not cracked to the point of bleeding that is.  Simply piss on your feet as soon as you get in the shower.  Then the last thing you do before getting out of the shower is wash your feet with soap.  It will help cure the foot fast and it's free.  I learned that tip when I was a young Paratrooper.  Thank God for Combat Medics.  They truly are some of the best.    I wear boots for at-least 10 hours a day and my feet sweat like crazy.   It sounds gross, but it's effective.
Link Posted: 5/14/2011 5:55:59 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arcticwarrior:
A quick cure for athlete's foot.  As long as your feet are not cracked to the point of bleeding that is.  Simply piss on your feet as soon as you get in the shower.  Then the last thing you do before getting out of the shower is wash your feet with soap.  It will help cure the foot fast and it's free.  I learned that tip when I was a young Paratrooper.  Thank God for Combat Medics.  They truly are some of the best.    I wear boots for at-least 10 hours a day and my feet sweat like crazy.   It sounds gross, but it's effective.


Combat medics have a great sense of humor, too. They like to treat urine-stained feet.
Link Posted: 5/14/2011 6:00:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Originally Posted By arcticwarrior:
A quick cure for athlete's foot.  As long as your feet are not cracked to the point of bleeding that is.  Simply piss on your feet as soon as you get in the shower.  Then the last thing you do before getting out of the shower is wash your feet with soap.  It will help cure the foot fast and it's free.  I learned that tip when I was a young Paratrooper.  Thank God for Combat Medics.  They truly are some of the best.    I wear boots for at-least 10 hours a day and my feet sweat like crazy.   It sounds gross, but it's effective.


Combat medics have a great sense of humor, too. They like to treat urine-stained feet.


eta

Here's the straight dope on peeing on your feet.

from no less an expert than the immortal Cecil Adams.
Link Posted: 5/14/2011 2:50:28 PM EDT
See, now you ruined it.  It must have been psychosomatic because it has worked for me for years.    Now watch, it won't work anymore.  I have always known the medics have a great if not warped sense of humor as well.  
Link Posted: 5/17/2011 1:54:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By arcticwarrior:
See, now you ruined it.  It must have been psychosomatic because it has worked for me for years.    Now watch, it won't work anymore.  I have always known the medics have a great if not warped sense of humor as well.  


The best therapy for athlete's foot (for me) is to mount a determined offensive on it. First of all, CONTAIN THAT CALLUS! Callus is (mostly) dead skin, and it cracks easily. Cracks are the method by which the fungus bypasses your body's first line of defense, i.e. your skin. So shave* and file the calluses, THEN apply the Tinactin or whatever antifungal cream you use.

I was surprised to find just how deep the cracks went.


*Yes I said SHAVE. There are callus shaving devices out there, usually found in the cosmetics department. After a bath or shower, when the skin is soft and wet, shave a few peels off your foot. You will be surprised at how much material you can take off without hurting your feet!
Link Posted: 5/21/2011 7:22:04 PM EDT
soap bubble leak detector

When I hook up my propane appliances, e.g., heater, camp stove, lanterns, propane tree, RV range/oven,  I like to know there is not a leak.

I put about 5 1/2 ounces of -20*F windshield washer fluid and about a 1/2 ounce of common liquid dish soap in a small, cheap spray bottle.   Then I put the bottle in a freezer zip lock bag to keep my gear dry in our kit bags.  

after hooking up the propane appliance I spray the leak detector all over the connection.  Even a tiny leak will blow bubbles.  I tested the solution in our freezer and it never froze.  I have had our washer reservoir freeze on our car a time or two, though.

I keep a bottle of leak detector in each kit bag with an adjustable wrench and teflon tape.
Link Posted: 5/23/2011 8:34:07 PM EDT
Originally Posted By showpare:
soap bubble leak detector

When I hook up my propane appliances, e.g., heater, camp stove, lanterns, propane tree, RV range/oven,  I like to know there is not a leak.

I put about 5 1/2 ounces of -20*F windshield washer fluid and about a 1/2 ounce of common liquid dish soap in a small, cheap spray bottle.   Then I put the bottle in a freezer zip lock bag to keep my gear dry in our kit bags.  

after hooking up the propane appliance I spray the leak detector all over the connection.  Even a tiny leak will blow bubbles.  I tested the solution in our freezer and it never froze.  I have had our washer reservoir freeze on our car a time or two, though.

I keep a bottle of leak detector in each kit bag with an adjustable wrench and teflon tape.


nice....I do this at work....guess I'll set up some small bottles for the camp kit....
Link Posted: 6/5/2011 7:55:45 PM EDT
made from magnesium fire steel....not mine...but cool...

Link Posted: 6/7/2011 2:43:48 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/7/2011 2:45:12 AM EDT by FrankSymptoms]
The knife retainer strap on this Ka Bar can (and should) be modified. This modification should be performed on all similar sheaths.



Remove the retainer strap from its location near the top of the sheath. Cut a couple of slices in the sheath on the belt loop, just above the point where the blade enters the sheath. Thread the retainer strap through these cutout places.

Without this modification, the knife will slide far enough out of the sheath that 3 or 4 inches of blade will be exposed. With this mod, the knife won't do this.

Also, if you should fall on your butt with the knife pointing down, the knife will ride up, alongside your belt, instead of ramming itself into your gut.
Link Posted: 6/9/2011 6:15:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
The knife retainer strap on this Ka Bar can (and should) be modified. This modification should be performed on all similar sheaths.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g169/franksymptoms/Survival/Modifyknifesheath.jpg

Remove the retainer strap from its location near the top of the sheath. Cut a couple of slices in the sheath on the belt loop, just above the point where the blade enters the sheath. Thread the retainer strap through these cutout places.

Without this modification, the knife will slide far enough out of the sheath that 3 or 4 inches of blade will be exposed. With this mod, the knife won't do this.

Also, if you should fall on your butt with the knife pointing down, the knife will ride up, alongside your belt, instead of ramming itself into your gut.


....thanks....
Link Posted: 6/30/2011 7:08:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TomMcC:
For a fire starter:
I lit a glow stick, cut the top off, and absorbed the liquid into a paper towel. It burns extremely well, and for a long time. Try it; wear rubber gloves.

sonny

P.S. I'm 12


the liquid from the stick is both non flammable and non toxic. All that was happening was you were keeping the paper from igniting more quickly because it was wet.

The best non liquid firestarter I've ever seen is a spot of laundry lint. Incredibly flammable. Easy way to make longer burning fuels is some cotton and petrolium jelly aka vaseline, they burn for a while.

Just don't burn your house down.
Link Posted: 6/30/2011 7:09:38 AM EDT
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Here's a goody:

Ever had a crack forming in a piece of plastic, say, your Kydex holster? You can try to glue it but it probably won't help.

What you need to do is drill a small hole in the very end of the crack, where it is just starting to separate the plastic. This stops the crack from spreading by spreading the point of failure –– the place where the crack starts–– over a wide area instead of a point area.


This is the semi secret method to fix glass as well, I assume that's where the idea came from?
Link Posted: 7/1/2011 2:29:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pwr2al4:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Here's a goody:

Ever had a crack forming in a piece of plastic, say, your Kydex holster? You can try to glue it but it probably won't help.

What you need to do is drill a small hole in the very end of the crack, where it is just starting to separate the plastic. This stops the crack from spreading by spreading the point of failure –– the place where the crack starts–– over a wide area instead of a point area.


This is the semi secret method to fix glass as well, I assume that's where the idea came from?


No, actually I saw my dad fix a crack in a steel plate this way; he later welded it. But I DID fix my Crossbreed holster this way!
Link Posted: 7/1/2011 2:45:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pwr2al4:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Here's a goody:

Ever had a crack forming in a piece of plastic, say, your Kydex holster? You can try to glue it but it probably won't help.

What you need to do is drill a small hole in the very end of the crack, where it is just starting to separate the plastic. This stops the crack from spreading by spreading the point of failure –– the place where the crack starts–– over a wide area instead of a point area.


This is the semi secret method to fix glass as well, I assume that's where the idea came from?


Commonly done in aerospace also
Link Posted: 7/1/2011 3:23:42 AM EDT
For those who don't know...


it is possible to braze/solder ALUMINUM! I've done it a number of times and the most exotic tool you'll need is a propane torch*. The things you'll need are available on ebay for less than $10!



*I soldered small (1/4" or less) aluminum pieces. Large pieces may need a hotter torch.
Link Posted: 7/1/2011 10:56:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 35mm_Shooter:
Originally Posted By pwr2al4:
Originally Posted By FrankSymptoms:
Here's a goody:

Ever had a crack forming in a piece of plastic, say, your Kydex holster? You can try to glue it but it probably won't help.

What you need to do is drill a small hole in the very end of the crack, where it is just starting to separate the plastic. This stops the crack from spreading by spreading the point of failure –– the place where the crack starts–– over a wide area instead of a point area.


This is the semi secret method to fix glass as well, I assume that's where the idea came from?


Commonly done in aerospace also


very cool. either way good tip. Kydex has really started to change at least in my mind from  wow this stuff is great but i dont have the slighest clue how to work it and i wish it wasnt so damn expensive for a sheet of plastic. to, wow kydex is really pretty easy to work with with just some basic stuff, imagine the millions ofdifferent projects i can use this stuff for. now i have a way to easily repair my mistakes. good times.

Link Posted: 7/1/2011 11:04:41 PM EDT
Cheap cheap flashlight upgrade. I've tried it and was very happy with the results.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mnkjvEdeIlc
Link Posted: 7/2/2011 1:41:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/2/2011 1:45:46 AM EDT by FrankSymptoms]
If I haven't mentioned it here: The Garrity disposable flashlights flashlights are very good! I had one in my El Camino that I'd misplaced for about 3 years... of high (95 degree) and low (40 degree) temperatures.

I found it just 8 hours before I needed it... it was a dark and stormy night... and I had a flat tire... in the middle of nowhere... the flashlight did the job for me.

And they only cost about $2.00 or so. Cheap insurance!
Link Posted: 7/10/2011 9:26:12 AM EDT
Keep an old Stabil bottle and put carb cleaner in it.  It's easy to dose gas cans when you add the snake oil.  I take off the label and mark the bottle with the recommended dose calculated for 5 gals.  Who knows if the carb cleaner works/helps in my car or generator, but it's easier and makes me feel better.
Link Posted: 7/10/2011 9:59:14 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/10/2011 9:59:50 AM EDT by showpare]
Originally Posted By Echo2:
made from magnesium fire steel....not mine...but cool...
"
 


I want!
Link Posted: 7/22/2011 3:32:12 AM EDT
What tool do you use to cut  magnesium?
Link Posted: 7/23/2011 10:29:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By ScubaTexas:
What tool do you use to cut  magnesium?


for that I would use a drill and a saw....kinda like working with aluminum....try not to catch it on fire though.

I've seen a magnesium aircraft rim set on fire in the desert as a marker....

It's really bright and odds are you don't have a extinguisher to put it out....
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