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Posted: 9/26/2011 7:25:37 PM EST
I am looking to buy a complete package first aid kit. I want something that has all the major necessities, but I would rather not have to buy individual components. I would like to buy several to have in my home, car, workplace, ect.

Can anybody recommend a good packaged first aid kit?
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 1:52:55 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2011 1:54:19 AM EST by ilbob]
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
I am looking to buy a complete package first aid kit. I want something that has all the major necessities, but I would rather not have to buy individual components. I would like to buy several to have in my home, car, workplace, ect.

Can anybody recommend a good packaged first aid kit?


The perfect FAK seems to vary widely from person to person.

My inclination is to limit the contents to things I actually use on a regular basis and a few emergency items OTC drugs, band aids, etc., for the regularly used stuff. Things like gauze pads for major bleeding. Tweezers to remove splinters.

Others seem to feel the need to fill up on stuff they often have no clue even how to use.

WalMart has some pretty decent low end to mid range FAKs, as does every drug store in town. You can spend more or less, or get a cool tactical bag to put it in if you want, for whatever value that may or may not have to you.

I know you don't want to make your own but you may want to supplement any commercial FAK you purchase with things that you know from experience you may actually need or need more of.

Link Posted: 9/27/2011 3:52:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2011 4:57:51 AM EST by Curry]
If I was forced to pick a premade FAK I would go with which ever kit from "Adventure Medical" suited my family the best. They range from small to large.

I am of the mind though, that if it is worth having a kit for your family it's worth building your own.

If you do build your own try Chinook medical. They have some modules that you can buy that make it easy to put one together.

More important than a kit is training. Get everyone in the house that's old enough thru a Red Cross CPR/first aid course.
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 4:20:55 AM EST
Honestly, if your going to be getting several kits it may be worth your while to buy some supplies in bulk and make tailor your own kits. I know Chinook medical has some great supplies. The only good pre-made kits I've had experiece with are the Adventure Medical Kits (not bad for the money). Although I've never bought any, You may also want to check this guy out on youtube (USNERDOC) who makes pre made kits that seem pretty squared away, here is his site :http://www.amp-3.net/index.html
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 4:53:39 AM EST
Originally Posted By bravo72989:
Honestly, if your going to be getting several kits it may be worth your while to buy some supplies in bulk and make tailor your own kits. I know Chinook medical has some great supplies. The only good pre-made kits I've had experiece with are the Adventure Medical Kits (not bad for the money). Although I've never bought any, You may also want to check this guy out on youtube (USNERDOC) who makes pre made kits that seem pretty squared away, here is his site :http://www.amp-3.net/index.html


Chinook is a great place to order from. I pieced several kits together from them. You wont be disappointed with them at all.
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 5:31:20 AM EST
tag
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 7:29:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/27/2011 7:50:14 AM EST by XSabers]
My son picked up this one for his hunting and "jeep adventures" and really likes it. It's got a detachable trauma kit inside. Adventure Medical Hunter kit

I'm getting one for my wifes "truck kit" because it comes with just about everything she might need in a prepackaged format. I'll add a couple small items to round out what it already has. Our home kit was put together with items from Chinook Medical. A big +1 for their service, quality. and prices.
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 1:53:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 6:01:48 PM EST
Thanks guys, this was all great information.

I have a problem where when I want something, I have to get the best...

....which is why it looks like I'm going to buy a kit from Chinook. $250 seems well worth it for this kind of thing.

Now I just have to have my EMT buddy explain a lot of this stuff for me!
Link Posted: 9/27/2011 6:24:25 PM EST
Originally Posted By EmergencyEssentials:
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
I am looking to buy a complete package first aid kit. I want something that has all the major necessities, but I would rather not have to buy individual components. I would like to buy several to have in my home, car, workplace, ect.

Can anybody recommend a good packaged first aid kit?


We have several great preassembled kits for reaonable prices here and here. As has been mentioned before, the perfect first aid kit really depends on your needs as an individual and a family. Because of this, we would recomend taking a look at our Build your own First Aid kit feature.

The nice thing about buying multiple kits at the same time is that you can rotate those supplies that expire at the same time too. Fewer dates to remember, less worrying.

Good Luck!


I think I'm going to buy 2 of the Medic kits for my car and office. Good for the price too!
Link Posted: 9/28/2011 5:22:54 PM EST
Just make sure you know when and how to use everything. Training and refreshers are valuable.

Personally, I took a rather comprehensive camping kit (REI version), then added an extra SAM splint, a couple Israeli bandages, combat gauze, CAT tourniquet, self-adhesive wrap, and a couple extra sterile gauze rolls. For me, that seemed like a good way to go. The camping kit covers all the every-day, annoying injuries, and my additions can stop major bleeding. I know a couple people who have seen gunshot wounds at ranges or significant trauma at crash sites, so I prefer to have a bit of serious gear on hand (until the professionals arrive.)
Link Posted: 9/28/2011 5:27:05 PM EST
Check out www.southernplainsconsulting.com and see what you think of that one.
Link Posted: 9/28/2011 6:21:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By Blackjack25:
Check out www.southernplainsconsulting.com and see what you think of that one.


That looks really good, how much do they charge for their consulting services? I obviously can't attend their seminars, so do they do it over email or what?
Link Posted: 9/28/2011 6:26:57 PM EST
Originally Posted By raimius:
Just make sure you know when and how to use everything. Training and refreshers are valuable.

Personally, I took a rather comprehensive camping kit (REI version), then added an extra SAM splint, a couple Israeli bandages, combat gauze, CAT tourniquet, self-adhesive wrap, and a couple extra sterile gauze rolls. For me, that seemed like a good way to go. The camping kit covers all the every-day, annoying injuries, and my additions can stop major bleeding. I know a couple people who have seen gunshot wounds at ranges or significant trauma at crash sites, so I prefer to have a bit of serious gear on hand (until the professionals arrive.)


Also, can you explain where I can find more information on training?
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 1:16:12 AM EST
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
Originally Posted By raimius:
Just make sure you know when and how to use everything. Training and refreshers are valuable.

Personally, I took a rather comprehensive camping kit (REI version), then added an extra SAM splint, a couple Israeli bandages, combat gauze, CAT tourniquet, self-adhesive wrap, and a couple extra sterile gauze rolls. For me, that seemed like a good way to go. The camping kit covers all the every-day, annoying injuries, and my additions can stop major bleeding. I know a couple people who have seen gunshot wounds at ranges or significant trauma at crash sites, so I prefer to have a bit of serious gear on hand (until the professionals arrive.)


Also, can you explain where I can find more information on training?


Check with your local college and see if they offer the EMT-B course. You could always check with your local EMS/Fire Dept. to see what classes they offer to public, I know around here they offer atleast basic CPR classes.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 5:02:02 AM EST

Originally Posted By bravo72989:
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
Originally Posted By raimius:
Just make sure you know when and how to use everything. Training and refreshers are valuable.

Personally, I took a rather comprehensive camping kit (REI version), then added an extra SAM splint, a couple Israeli bandages, combat gauze, CAT tourniquet, self-adhesive wrap, and a couple extra sterile gauze rolls. For me, that seemed like a good way to go. The camping kit covers all the every-day, annoying injuries, and my additions can stop major bleeding. I know a couple people who have seen gunshot wounds at ranges or significant trauma at crash sites, so I prefer to have a bit of serious gear on hand (until the professionals arrive.)


Also, can you explain where I can find more information on training?


Check with your local college and see if they offer the EMT-B course. You could always check with your local EMS/Fire Dept. to see what classes they offer to public, I know around here they offer atleast basic CPR classes.

I don't have advice on where to find training but I can tell you this: Having training is more important than having stuff. Almost anything besides specific drugs can be improvised. Training can't be improvised. Getting trained on first aid, cpr, wilderness first aid where professional help is not immediately available is invaluable for any prepper, for anyone for that matter.

It can sound intimidating at first but it's knowledge which lives will depend on when shit hits the fan.

First thing is to get the basics down. Like basic first aid, what to do with cuts and scrapes around the house. How to apply pressure to a bleeding wound, what to do when someone gets a finger chopped off working in the garden, what to do and not do when someone gets something in their eye, what to do when great uncle tom is lying face down on the ground clutching his chest...

Then move up, learn basic anatomy and physiology, learn most common accidents and how to treat them, bee stings/allergies, poisonings, electrocution, drowning, traffic accidents, burns, minor trauma. What to do and what not to do in these situations.

Odds are you'll never have to perform field expedient amputations or appendectomies but knowing how to help a doctor will put you ahead of a ton of people.

Get trained, read up on this stuff.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 5:08:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 5:11:25 AM EST by Warlord_Doc]
If you know how to use it,

http://narescue.com/Squad_Kit_(CCRK)-CNF088ABAEC215.html?BC=3000250D2301

This is what I carry in my car and have at home. Very good for multiple casualties. But as said above, knowing how to use it is more important than what kit you carry.

Link Posted: 9/29/2011 5:23:56 AM EST
All you need is here:


http://www.amp-3.net/products.html
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:43:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 6:45:57 AM EST by Eli822]
Not sure how far you are from the PA class location, but here is some training that includes supplies. Grey Group Training Details state you will be issued 2 North American Rescue kits, one to use during the class, the other to take with you when you leave.

I've bought most of the medical stuff I have from Rescue Essentials
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 7:44:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By Eli822:
Not sure how far you are from the PA class location, but here is some training that includes supplies. Grey Group Training Details state you will be issued 2 North American Rescue kits, one to use during the class, the other to take with you when you leave.

I've bought most of the medical stuff I have from Rescue Essentials


No previous experience at all. Grey Group Training 2 Day Course doesn't appear to be for me?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 4:32:46 PM EST

No previous experience at all. Grey Group Training 2 Day Course doesn't appear to be for me?


From the class description...No prior medical knowledge is required to attend this course.

Core Competencies: Hemorrhage Control, Basic Airway Management, Recognition and Management of Tension Pneumothorax, Recognition and Management of Hypothermia, Casualty Evacuation.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:28:59 PM EST
Originally Posted By Eli822:

No previous experience at all. Grey Group Training 2 Day Course doesn't appear to be for me?


From the class description...No prior medical knowledge is required to attend this course.

Core Competencies: Hemorrhage Control, Basic Airway Management, Recognition and Management of Tension Pneumothorax, Recognition and Management of Hypothermia, Casualty Evacuation.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but does that mean they want participants to be competent in those following areas?

Cause I can only check "NO" to all of them.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 7:10:03 PM EST
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
Originally Posted By Eli822:

No previous experience at all. Grey Group Training 2 Day Course doesn't appear to be for me?


From the class description...No prior medical knowledge is required to attend this course.

Core Competencies: Hemorrhage Control, Basic Airway Management, Recognition and Management of Tension Pneumothorax, Recognition and Management of Hypothermia, Casualty Evacuation.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but does that mean they want participants to be competent in those following areas?

Cause I can only check "NO" to all of them.


Those are the skills they will be teaching you.

20

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:31:32 PM EST
Originally Posted By KR20:
Originally Posted By armydan21M:
Originally Posted By Eli822:

No previous experience at all. Grey Group Training 2 Day Course doesn't appear to be for me?


From the class description...No prior medical knowledge is required to attend this course.

Core Competencies: Hemorrhage Control, Basic Airway Management, Recognition and Management of Tension Pneumothorax, Recognition and Management of Hypothermia, Casualty Evacuation.


Correct me if I'm wrong, but does that mean they want participants to be competent in those following areas?

Cause I can only check "NO" to all of them.


Those are the skills they will be teaching you.

20



Thanks.

What's the 20?
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 8:38:45 PM EST
Anybody looking to attend this course? I think I'm going to do it. It's still about a 3 hour hike from me, but for the training and experience it looks worth it.
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