Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/13/2005 6:56:30 PM EDT
As we all know the call letters east of the Mississippi are W and west is K. Now here is my question: Why K and W? Why not Z and A (ect)?
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 7:01:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2005 7:07:19 PM EDT by gunham]
The USA is assigned the letters A, K, N and W by international agreement. The other letters are assigned to other countries.

Here's a quick guide.

www.hamradioindia.com/HRI-RULES/callsigns.htm
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 7:05:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Penguin_101:
As we all know the call letters east of the Mississippi are W and west is K. Now here is my question: Why K and W? Why not Z and A (ect)?



Not quite correct. There are a few exceptions, like WOAI here in San Antonio. It is both an AM (1200 kHz) and a television station (local broadcast channel 4).

Link Posted: 8/13/2005 7:07:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Keith_J:
Not quite correct. There are a few exceptions, like WOAI here in San Antonio.



KDKA in Pittsburgh, KYW in Philadelphia and WCCO in Minneapolis also come to mind.
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 7:07:12 PM EDT
WBAP is in arlington,tx
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 7:41:07 PM EDT
And KTRS in StL, but on the Illi. side. But do K and W stand for anything. I am always wondered this.
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 10:10:00 PM EDT
Station call letters were grandfathered by the Communications act of 1938. WBAP and others west of the Big Muddy got to keep theirs but everything else afterward went K/W.

This law is the reason that over the air radio and TV are still free and that the airwaves belong to the public. You can receive these signals without license or fee. This argument is also being used to keep radar detectors legal too. It is after all a receiver of microwaves or laser beams. The Jammers are not legal because they transmit.

Since these are free to the public transmitted over the air how did the dish folks get away with scrambling their signal?
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 10:17:02 PM EDT
I believe the dish folks get away with it because it's non terrestrial. (ie - satellite transmission)

I may be wrong so feel free to correct me
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 11:00:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cadmonkey:
I believe the dish folks get away with it because it's non terrestrial. (ie - satellite transmission)

I may be wrong so feel free to correct me



Not really. It is a special part of the spectrum that was not useable at the time of the initial drafting of FCC regulations.

Anyone is free to receive it, its just the content that is scrambled. Theoretically, someone could scramble regular broadcasts but they would have to inject station identification in the specified format at the required periods.

Link Posted: 8/13/2005 11:03:28 PM EDT
Radio of University of North Texas


K UNT
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 11:04:11 PM EDT

Originally Posted By gunham:
The USA is assigned the letters A, K, N and W by international agreement. The other letters are assigned to other countries.

Here's a quick guide.

www.hamradioindia.com/HRI-RULES/callsigns.htm





So how many radio stations have callsigns that start with A or N?
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 11:14:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By napalm:
So how many radio stations have callsigns that start with A or N?



I can't think of any commercial stations.

Military, Aeronautical, Amateur, Marine, Experimental and Diplomatic stations may begin with A or N.

(BTW, the USA has only AA through AK call signs in the "A" range.)
Link Posted: 8/13/2005 11:20:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/13/2005 11:26:23 PM EDT by Gamma762]

Originally Posted By napalm:

Originally Posted By gunham:
The USA is assigned the letters A, K, N and W by international agreement. The other letters are assigned to other countries.
Here's a quick guide.
www.hamradioindia.com/HRI-RULES/callsigns.htm



So how many radio stations have callsigns that start with A or N?


Tons of them. Just not broadcast stations.

Look on the back of any civilian aircraft for example and you'll find an "N" prefix radio callsign. Actually for "A" only AA though AK (IIRC) is assigned to the US, most of those are Amateur radio callsigns.
Top Top