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Posted: 3/18/2013 4:55:01 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 4:57:51 AM EDT
I "bought into" it several months ago and received one a couple of months ago. I have not used it yet do to some health problems.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 4:59:52 AM EDT
I usually just pull the dipstick and check it that way. But I'm old school like that.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:00:01 AM EDT
Or this could be just another trick to get us to change our oil faster to line the pockets of the billionaires. Neat concept I suppose
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:05:56 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Devin007:
I usually just pull the dipstick and check it that way. But I'm old school like that.

RIF...
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:16:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2013 5:20:26 AM EDT by DasRonin]
It is actually designed to check the "contamination" that builds up which reduces the effectiveness of oil.

The purpose is to chemically check the oil TO ENSURE THAT A PREMATURE OIL CHANGE DOES NOT HAPPEN due to the industry created standards of changing oil every 3K miles or after "X" numbers of months.

It has nothing to do with "using the dip stick" to check oil... or changing the oil because 'it looks dirty".

The user periodically uses the tester to ensure the oil is still ok to use... and only change oil when the tester indicates it has broken down or has become contaminated.

The concept is to EXTEND intervals between oil changes.
Originally Posted By Devin007:
I usually just pull the dipstick and check it that way. But I'm old school like that.


Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:19:28 AM EDT
I like this!
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:46:06 AM EDT
The fine print says it also tests sperm count and motility.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 5:59:48 AM EDT
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:00:47 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:02:09 AM EDT
I catch a sample and mail it to an oil analysis company about every 15 thousand miles when I change my oil.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:03:10 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This:

Plus, very few people give a shit about their vehicles enough to care about the oil.

A few OCD friggin' nut jobs will buy them, then realise they don't tell the whole story.

Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:04:23 AM EDT
Solution in need of a problem.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:08:48 AM EDT
Yeah.... I'll keep using Blackstone Labs for my testing. I'm sending in a sample next week.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:10:45 AM EDT
Who is offering this for sale? A google search yields nothing.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:16:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
i wonder if that would hold up for warranty service on the engine. i doubt it. might be nice for my old clunker though.


meh every 36,000 miles or when I finally got around to it when I thought about it had the oil and filter and the weather was nice, on my beater.


It had one at about63,000 and I just changed it ajustbefore it rolled over to 100,000. If it was a kid it would have been taken away by CPS


1993 Olds Cutlass Ciera. Has the 3300 destroked Buick 3800 V6. I know the 3800 can take some neglect I guess that goes for the 3300 too. We'll see I guess. Only problem has been a sticking tourge converter lockup. Maybe should change the ATF too ?
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:17:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 50-140:
Who is offering this for sale? A google search yields nothing.


Lubricheck, took me 2 seconds though they are currently sold out.

http://lubricheck.com/
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:23:38 AM EDT
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 6:59:05 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NoVaRight:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This:

Plus, very few people give a shit about their vehicles enough to care about the oil.

A few OCD friggin' nut jobs will buy them, then realise they don't tell the whole story.



It's amazing how obsessed some people are about their oil, especially when there are others who drive their cars without even knowing the oil has to be changed. My take is the quantity of oil is more important than the quality.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:11:49 AM EDT
Originally Posted By macpherson:
Originally Posted By NoVaRight:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This:

Plus, very few people give a shit about their vehicles enough to care about the oil.

A few OCD friggin' nut jobs will buy them, then realise they don't tell the whole story.



It's amazing how obsessed some people are about their oil, especially when there are others who drive their cars without even knowing the oil has to be changed. My take is the quantity of oil is more important than the quality.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I can see oil quality testing making sense for those who race or drive mega mileage and don't want to spend more money on new oil than needed but for the average schmoe who drives 20K per year in a normal car it seems like an awful lot of kidding yourself.

If you change your oil every 5K then you're talking 4 times per year, every 3K means 6-7 times per year. Is stretching the oil change interval out to the longest possible interval going to save you hundreds of dollars? I guess if it makes you feel better.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:17:14 AM EDT
Maybe not... but after two "skipped" oil changes and the tester has paid for its self.

Originally Posted By Lomshek:
Originally Posted By macpherson:
Originally Posted By NoVaRight:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This:

Plus, very few people give a shit about their vehicles enough to care about the oil.

A few OCD friggin' nut jobs will buy them, then realise they don't tell the whole story.



It's amazing how obsessed some people are about their oil, especially when there are others who drive their cars without even knowing the oil has to be changed. My take is the quantity of oil is more important than the quality.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile


I can see oil quality testing making sense for those who race or drive mega mileage and don't want to spend more money on new oil than needed but for the average schmoe who drives 20K per year in a normal car it seems like an awful lot of kidding yourself.

If you change your oil every 5K then you're talking 4 times per year, every 3K means 6-7 times per year. Is stretching the oil change interval out to the longest possible interval going to save you hundreds of dollars? I guess if it makes you feel better.


Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:18:33 AM EDT
Originally Posted By The_Beer_Slayer:
Originally Posted By DasRonin:
It is actually designed to check the "contamination" that builds up which reduces the effectiveness of oil.

The purpose is to chemically check the oil TO ENSURE THAT A PREMATURE OIL CHANGE DOES NOT HAPPEN due to the industry created standards of changing oil every 3K miles or after "X" numbers of months.

It has nothing to do with "using the dip stick" to check oil... or changing the oil because 'it looks dirty".

The user periodically uses the tester to ensure the oil is still ok to use... and only change oil when the tester indicates it has broken down or has become contaminated.

The concept is to EXTEND intervals between oil changes.
Originally Posted By Devin007:
I usually just pull the dipstick and check it that way. But I'm old school like that.




i wonder if that would hold up for warranty service on the engine. i doubt it. might be nice for my old clunker though.

Manufacturers have had extended intervals for a while, as long as you follow what they say in the owners manual you will be OK.

The lowest new car interval is 5k, with some up to 20k, and some are just when the car tells you based on a built in monitor.


Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:31:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This device appears to measure TBN, which in most applications is the OCI-limiting factor.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:47:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


+1
I've done this many times when purchasing a used vehicle. Hasn't failed yet, but of course it requires you to have the knowledge and experience to know what you're smelling.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:50:34 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CWO:
Yeah.... I'll keep using Blackstone Labs for my testing. I'm sending in a sample next week.


Can you show us one of the reports you get back from Blackstone Labs please?

Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:51:51 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TexasSmooth:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


+1
I've done this many times when purchasing a used vehicle. Hasn't failed yet, but of course it requires you to have the knowledge and experience to know what you're smelling.


That doesn't do anything other than make your fingers dirty.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 7:57:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By TexasSmooth:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


+1
I've done this many times when purchasing a used vehicle. Hasn't failed yet, but of course it requires you to have the knowledge and experience to know what you're smelling.


That doesn't do anything other than make your fingers dirty.


Yep. Gotta taste it to be sure.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:03:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NoVaRight:
Originally Posted By CWO:
Yeah.... I'll keep using Blackstone Labs for my testing. I'm sending in a sample next week.


Can you show us one of the reports you get back from Blackstone Labs please?


Sure. Will do.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:08:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/18/2013 9:09:06 AM EDT by Admiral_Crunch]
Shit. My car has diabetes.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:11:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By DasRonin:
Maybe not... but after two "skipped" oil changes and the tester has paid for its self.



Unfortunately, it won't pay for your prematurely worn out engine.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:12:29 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


This oil is certified "CoffeeTime" approved.

It'll still seize your engine if left any longer but it has that consistency and bouquet that he enjoys.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:12:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By 53vortec:
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By TexasSmooth:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


+1
I've done this many times when purchasing a used vehicle. Hasn't failed yet, but of course it requires you to have the knowledge and experience to know what you're smelling.


That doesn't do anything other than make your fingers dirty.


Yep. Gotta taste it to be sure.


Works with teh wimminz too
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:18:27 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Admiral_Crunch:
Shit. My car has diabetes.


Mine's pregnant
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:23:56 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This device appears to measure TBN, which in most applications is the OCI-limiting factor.


The article says that it measures contaminants based on the capacitive and resistive properties of the oil. I saw no mention of alkalinity.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:25:54 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This device appears to measure TBN, which in most applications is the OCI-limiting factor.


The article says that it measures contaminants based on the capacitive and resistive properties of the oil. I saw no mention of alkalinity.


Read the website more carefully - it mentions TBN. Also, there is a previous version of this product from the same people that was discussed on BITOG, and there were indications that it was estimating TBN or TAN.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:26:50 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:35:31 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This device appears to measure TBN, which in most applications is the OCI-limiting factor.


The article says that it measures contaminants based on the capacitive and resistive properties of the oil. I saw no mention of alkalinity.


Read the website more carefully - it mentions TBN. Also, there is a previous version of this product from the same people that was discussed on BITOG, and there were indications that it was estimating TBN or TAN.


I didn't look at the web site. It might be just fine, but there are an awful lot of variables for a little gadget to condense down to just one readout. I think I'll just change my oil when it's due. It's really cheap compared to new trucks, and I don't want to buy one any sooner than I have to.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:36:41 AM EDT
I haven't even pulled my dipstick in the last 25k. I don't even check it when I change the oil anymore. Drain oil out, put in 5 new quarts.

Step 1: Get a really good synthetic oil.
Step 2: Change it somewhere between 7-10k when the wether is nice.
Step 3: ????
Step 4: Profit
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:40:53 AM EDT
What's it cost for Blackstone analysis? $30 to $40?

2.5 gallons Delo at $12/gallon = $30.
+
Premium Napa filter = $10.

My time isn't free of course, but still.

5 quart synthetic for my other car = $35
+
$8 Motorcraft filter

Still.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:41:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:

Read the website more carefully - it mentions TBN. Also, there is a previous version of this product from the same people that was discussed on BITOG, and there were indications that it was estimating TBN or TAN.


I didn't look at the web site. It might be just fine, but there are an awful lot of variables for a little gadget to condense down to just one readout. I think I'll just change my oil when it's due. It's really cheap compared to new trucks, and I don't want to buy one any sooner than I have to.


I agree, I'm not buying one. Apparently it's some amalgamation of TBN and contaminants (coolant and excessive amounts of conductive wear metals) that it measures. If I want to analyze my oil, I'll send a sample to a lab like Blackstone.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:43:25 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By TexasSmooth:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


+1
I've done this many times when purchasing a used vehicle. Hasn't failed yet, but of course it requires you to have the knowledge and experience to know what you're smelling.


That doesn't do anything other than make your fingers dirty.


I like to think of myself as an Indian tracker, squatting down and picking up a handful of dirt. Try telling the Indian it just gets his hands dirty

Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:44:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By NoVaRight:
Originally Posted By CWO:
Yeah.... I'll keep using Blackstone Labs for my testing. I'm sending in a sample next week.


Can you show us one of the reports you get back from Blackstone Labs please?



Enjoy
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:45:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RightwingNutjob:
Originally Posted By Admiral_Crunch:
Shit. My car has diabetes.


Mine's pregnant

Do you just open the trunk one day, and see this?



It's a girl!
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:46:36 AM EDT
Originally Posted By LHD:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:
Pull your dipstick, rub some oil between your thumb and finger, smell the oil.


This oil is certified "CoffeeTime" approved.

It'll still seize your engine if left any longer but it has that consistency and bouquet that he enjoys.


Lmao. I still change @ 3000 weather needed or not. Same reason why you would go through a race motor before each race.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:49:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By pcsutton:
I catch a sample and mail it to an oil analysis company about every 15 thousand miles when I change my oil.

Seriously? On your personal vehicle?
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:51:50 AM EDT
So it's for quality control

Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:55:03 AM EDT
So, what does this tell me that a white paper towel does not?
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:56:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:


Lmao. I still change @ 3000 weather needed or not. Same reason why you would go through a race motor before each race.


If you run the right multi-viscosity oil, the weather should not a factor.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:56:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By dbrowne1:
Originally Posted By ske714:
There are more important factors other than contaminants that cause your oil to become less effective. The additives break down, the viscosity changes, and acids form which cause corrosion.


This device appears to measure TBN, which in most applications is the OCI-limiting factor.

I bet it is more of a pH meter than a titrator. TBN can only be determined by titration.


Link Posted: 3/18/2013 9:59:17 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ske714:
Originally Posted By CoffeeTime:


Lmao. I still change @ 3000 weather needed or not. Same reason why you would go through a race motor before each race.


If you run the right multi-viscosity oil, the weather should not a factor.

good catch.
Link Posted: 3/18/2013 10:02:09 AM EDT
Originally Posted By JCKnife:

Originally Posted By pcsutton:
I catch a sample and mail it to an oil analysis company about every 15 thousand miles when I change my oil.

Seriously? On your personal vehicle?


Cult of Amsoil does weird shit to people. Like, Scientology weird.
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