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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 10/4/2005 9:17:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 9:23:17 AM EDT by BeetleBailey]
Questions:
1. What is the best website(s) for locating local wifi areas?
2. Do most WiFi networks require special 'log-on' access (SSID/WEP and all that jazz)?
3. How possible is it to get onto a wiFi network without having being given ^ info
4. How significant is the difference between B & G, and how far away (in time) is the next speed up technology?
5. Do internal cards have the ability to roam for open, unrestricted connections, or if not, how do you find them?
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:18:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/4/2005 9:37:59 AM EDT by mjohn3006]
What is WiFi?

What is SSID/WEP?

Is this some new military thing?

The SOP for any FAQ should be to limit acronyms.

www.acronymfinder.com/
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:19:38 AM EDT
2. Most. Although most of the pay by the day ones are open access with a username and password to get through the proxy server.
3. Not without breaking the crypto (hacking).
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:19:45 AM EDT
Question: How the heck do you get a Linsys Wireless-G Range Expander to work with a D-link DI-514 router?

I have tried it numerous times and keep getting the error "will not work in repeater mode with this AP".
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:21:26 AM EDT
1. Check with local internet service providers.

2. Yes, WiFi networks all will have an SSID of some kind, weather or not it is broadcasted or not. Some will have wep, and even some will take it further and require PPPoE sessions.

3. You can browse for SSIDs with wireless config utilities, but as far as secured netoworks, if the person running the network doesnt want you to have the info, suck it the hell up and dont bother.

Of course, using a non-public secured wi-fi network without the owners consent is stealing, and anyone who tries to do this is a thief. Makes me glad that my wireless firewall has intrusion detection, and tells me how far away the person trying to get on the network is, and his mac address.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:30:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:
1. Check with local internet service providers.

2. Yes, WiFi networks all will have an SSID of some kind, weather or not it is broadcasted or not. Some will have wep, and even some will take it further and require PPPoE sessions.

3. You can browse for SSIDs with wireless config utilities, but as far as secured netoworks, if the person running the network doesnt want you to have the info, suck it the hell up and dont bother.

Of course, using a non-public secured wi-fi network without the owners consent is stealing, and anyone who tries to do this is a thief. Makes me glad that my wireless firewall has intrusion detection, and tells me how far away the person trying to get on the network is, and his mac address.



what he said, he's the wireless man
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:38:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:
1. Check with local internet service providers.

2. Yes, WiFi networks all will have an SSID of some kind, weather or not it is broadcasted or not. Some will have wep, and even some will take it further and require PPPoE sessions.

3. You can browse for SSIDs with wireless config utilities, but as far as secured netoworks, if the person running the network doesnt want you to have the info, suck it the hell up and dont bother.

Of course, using a non-public secured wi-fi network without the owners consent is stealing, and anyone who tries to do this is a thief. Makes me glad that my wireless firewall has intrusion detection, and tells me how far away the person trying to get on the network is, and his mac address.



What type of router/firewall are you using?
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 9:59:40 AM EDT

Originally Posted By yugosksfan:

Originally Posted By adair_usmc:
1. Check with local internet service providers.

2. Yes, WiFi networks all will have an SSID of some kind, weather or not it is broadcasted or not. Some will have wep, and even some will take it further and require PPPoE sessions.

3. You can browse for SSIDs with wireless config utilities, but as far as secured netoworks, if the person running the network doesnt want you to have the info, suck it the hell up and dont bother.

Of course, using a non-public secured wi-fi network without the owners consent is stealing, and anyone who tries to do this is a thief. Makes me glad that my wireless firewall has intrusion detection, and tells me how far away the person trying to get on the network is, and his mac address.



What type of router/firewall are you using?



SonicWALL TZ-170 SP Wireless

www.sonicwall.com/products/tz170SP_wireless.html

Here is a site that sells them, but I got mine a couple of hundred dollars cheaper, through my company.

www.superwarehouse.com/SonicWALL_TZ_170__SP_10_-_Node_Wireless_Firewall/01-SSC-5740/p/469109


I dont screw around when it comes to firewalls.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:06:49 AM EDT
www.broadbandreports.com/forum/wlan

The ARFCOM of all that is broadband & networking. That's a direct link to their wireless forum.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:08:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
Questions:
1. What is the best website(s) for locating local wifi areas?
2. Do most WiFi networks require special 'log-on' access (SSID/WEP and all that jazz)?
3. How possible is it to get onto a wiFi network without having being given ^ info
4. How significant is the difference between B & G, and how far away (in time) is the next speed up technology?
5. Do internal cards have the ability to roam for open, unrestricted connections, or if not, how do you find them?



imo:

1) www.wifinder.com - check www.wardriving.com for more info or just Google "war driving"

2) only if the admin is smart. too many just run with default settings which is usually:
a. no encryption (WEP, WPA, etc.)
b. open SSID broadcast
c. default factory router password and SSID
d. no MAC filtering

3) That's cracking. see #1 for hints on research. not as easy as it might sound but its been done. requires the right software (usually *nix based) and patience. Or you just get lucky and hit a weak admin. There are known exploits or patterns in the older WEP based security models. WPA and shared-key is tougher. MAC spoofing, etc. can also get you in depending on the site you're trying to crack.

4) B is the old 802.11b standard 11mps I believe (reality - ~4mps). G is 802.11g and hits 54mps theoretical (reality - ~20mps). both are on 2.4 GHZ, G is backward compatible with B. 802.11a or A is in the 5ghz range and offers the same speed as G but supports different technology and theoretically sustains higher average through-put. A is not compatible with G&B unless you run a card that supports all 3. I think the newer tech is still based on G & A but uses "shotgunning" or multiple bands to increase the sustained through-put. not sure on specifics cause I haven't messed with it lately.

5) Most modern WICS can be put into "sniff" mode - that is, they'll identify and try to connect to any open SSIDs in range automatically. see #1 for more information. Normally you just boot your laptop, run something like www.netstumbler.com and start driving around. Won't take long to find open WAPS.

hope this helps.
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:24:48 AM EDT
Thanks for the info!
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 10:35:42 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:06:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BeetleBailey:
Questions:
1. What is the best website(s) for locating local wifi areas?


No idea, but Googling "free local wireless internet" might get you some leads.

2. Do most WiFi networks require special 'log-on' access (SSID/WEP and all that jazz)?

SSID is always required, whether it is manually entered or automatically registered. WEP/WPA, encryption security, is usually required at commercial and some open public access areas (libraries, cafes, etc.).


3. How possible is it to get onto a wiFi network without having being given ^ info


Depending on the network, it can happen on accident if the network is set up with no encryption and no mac address filtering.

If there is encryption and/or MAC address filtering, you can assume that the network is either closed, or requires permission. Is it "possible" to get in or decrypt sniffed packets, yes, but since that requires positive action to circumvent a known security measure that would almost certainly be illegal under at least the regular "unauthorized access" laws.


4. How significant is the difference between B & G, and how far away (in time) is the next speed up technology?

The speed difference can be up to a factor of four or five times, if it's single-channel G. I don't keep up on this much any more, but 802.11n is supposedly just around the corner, which will double speed over standard G.


5. Do internal cards have the ability to roam for open, unrestricted connections, or if not, how do you find them?


It isn't the card, it's the software. Windows itself can roam for open unrestricted connections, and often will connect without your knowledge. Software included with cards lets you see all of the networks broadcasting SSID in your area, and usually tells you whether they're encrypted or not.

See these articles at Wikipedia for more technical info.

Jim
Link Posted: 10/4/2005 11:51:41 AM EDT

1. What is the best website(s) for locating local wifi areas?


Try:
http://www.wi-fi.org/OpenSection/index.asp?noFlash=true

Oddly, Yahoo and MapQuest maps will show hot spots as well on maps if you ask.


2. Do most WiFi networks require special 'log-on' access (SSID/WEP and all that jazz)?


Well, kind of depends. A large number of cities (mine included) have some sort of free wireless access in commercial areas. Many restuarants, cafes, and some gas stations have systems where you can pay for access on a per/unit time basis. Secured networks will require you have the info you listed.


3. How possible is it to get onto a wiFi network without having being given ^ info


If the network is unsecured and free to the public, it is easy as heck. Windows XP will spot it and offer to connect for you. Many neighborhoods are loaded with wide open unsecured access points in peoples homes that you can also get onto. This is, of course, illegal and unethical, but does happen. A popular activity in some areas is 'war driving' where people drive around and log unsecured wireless access points so they can come back later and piggyback on someone elses network. From my apartment, I can sometimes see as many as three unsecured wireless networks!


4. How significant is the difference between B & G, and how far away (in time) is the next speed up technology?


G is much faster than B and is generally backwards compatible with the older B standard. Ignore the old 'A' standard, it is going thew way of Beta. I recommend quality 'turbo G' cards from Linksys, D-Link, Cisco, et al. As for the next jump, hard to say. We are pretty close to what the band can support. The next big thing is WPA and WPA2 security.


5. Do internal cards have the ability to roam for open, unrestricted connections, or if not, how do you find them?


Windows XP with SP1 or SP2 have excellent ability to spot wireless networks. NetStumbler can even spot 'hidde' wireless networks that do not broadcast their secure station ID (SSID). Mac and Linux equivalents exist also. Internal and External wireless cards act the same way and can equally be used to pick up wireless APs.
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