Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
PSA
Member Login

Site Notices
Posted: 10/9/2005 10:49:59 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 10:53:05 AM EDT
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 3:22:44 PM EDT
One should normally expect to get approximately 10% off of the window sticker price on a normal buy w/o a trade, IMO. If you get 12-15% off, so much the better for you.

NEVER buy a car that has the little side add-on stickers from the dealers, they're pure profit, nothing else.

Always buy on the last day of the month. You can shop beforehand, but buy on the last day. Dealers are a lot more flexiable on the last day.

Be sure to ask about incentives & get everything in writing, take their word for nothing!

Good luck!
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 3:36:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/9/2005 3:37:43 PM EDT by shocktrp]
There's 3 prices;

1. MSRP - the price on the sticker.

2. Dealer invoice - the price the dealer claims the dealer has paid for the vehicle. They have no problem showing you the invoice because it is not the true price they paid.

3. Hold-back - a hidden profit that the dealer makes.

www.car-prices-costs.com/dealer-cost.html

Formula for calculating dealer cost:

Example: Base Invoice + the Invoice price of Options + Destination - Holdback = Total Dealer Cost
What is Holdback? A hidden amount that manufacturers give back to a dealer. It is a percentage of the MSRP or the Invoice price. (See formula above for details.)
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 3:39:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 3:56:01 PM EDT
CK, what car are you looking at, I can tell you if it's good or bad...I know a lot about cars.  
Link Posted: 10/9/2005 4:00:37 PM EDT
Rule number 1: Don't buy a new car. Get a two year old used car and you can save a lot on one of the biggest expenses of vehicle ownership: depreciation.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:22:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By thelastgunslinger:
Rule number 1: Don't buy a new car. Get a two year old used car and you can save a lot on one of the biggest expenses of vehicle ownership: depreciation.




This wouldn't be a good choice if one plans on keeping the car for a long time, IMO. Not to mention, you don't know how well the maintenance had been kept up? Some folks do an oil change at 3K, some at 30K & some in between. At only two years old, it's not had enough time to develop problems yet, IMO.

As I say, this is if you're going to keep it 10 or more years, as I usually do.

My .o2
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:32:48 PM EDT
Edmunds  will show you a "Total Market Value" for the car you're interested in.  This TMV price will include your locale, paint color (can affect pricing), and options.  It is respected by reputable dealers as a valid price negotiating tool.

Another, similar website is CarPrices.com.  Through these folks, you can actually purchase your car, similar to Troy's experiences.

Good luck and do your research.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:38:43 PM EDT
I work in the internet sales department at a GM dealership.  Absolutely, positively, DO NOT buy a car without sending your information to the dealer online.  This could be through the dealer's website, a manufacturer website like www.gmbuypower.com, or another site like Autotrader.

This gets you in touch with the dealer's internet department, which is fiercely price competitive.  Bring the printed quote with you, and don't buy a car other than the one you've been quoted on.  That's the safest way to get a great deal on a new car.

Feel free to IM me if you have questions.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:42:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chokey:
www.carbuyingtips.com



HUGE +1. Learn it, love it, live it.
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 1:58:07 PM EDT
Link Posted: 10/10/2005 2:55:25 PM EDT

Not to mention, you don't know how well the maintenance had been kept up?

Or why the person got rid of the vehicle.  

For some cars, like soccer mom mini-vans, you can assume that the owner just wanted a new car even though it didn't make economic sense.  For other cars, you'll get screwed more often than not.  About 20 out of the last 24 trucks and vans I've bought used for work were complete junk.  If someone has a good truck with low miles, they're not just going to sale it to buy a new one for no reason.  When buying used, you can easily get something that can have dozens of problems.  We sold as junk the last two 24-36 month-old Ford trucks we bought.  They cost more to fix than they were worth, which is why the original owner got rid of them.  Yes you pay a lot more for a new vehicle, but it's a lot less risk.  Also, the state lemon laws protect you.z
Link Posted: 10/11/2005 1:07:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By zoom:

Yes you pay a lot more for a new vehicle, but it's a lot less risk.  






+1
Link Posted: 10/11/2005 1:11:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By BobCole:

Originally Posted By zoom:

Yes you pay a lot more for a new vehicle, but it's a lot less risk.  






+1


+2. Used cars are extremely hit-or-miss.  
Top Top