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Posted: 6/19/2002 11:23:45 AM EDT
Once again I am dealing with cheaters in my computer class. I have spoken with the dean and we are both trying to find a 'solution' to the problem. 1. Give cheaters a zero on the assignment 2. Tell the cheaters to withdraw or face an "F" for the course 3. Ignore the cheaters (Don't ask, Don't Tell) Option 1 bothers me. The cheaters are gambling they will not get caught. If they get caught, they only earn a zero. If they get away with it, Bingo! they get a reward! Option 2 is the current option. This is the correct approach IMHO. Severe consequences for a severe ethical infraction. Option 3 is the Ostrich approach, it has only been discussed in a joking manner, but it still is one possible solution. Telling a student they are cheating is confrontational. Emotions rise, feelings are hurt, threats are sometime made (by the students) and they NEVER admit they did anything wrong. I am left shouldering the burden of 'Proof.' I must: 1. Gather evidence 2. Support my claim 3. Meet with the student 4. Meet with the dean (because they always think they can override me through him) 5. Prepare to go to a committee if the student overrides the dean and myself This leaves me wondering, "Why bother, they are only hurting themselves...?" This problem is not exactly rampant, however, 12 students in a class of 24 we caught redhanded in the Spring semester. 4 students out of 11 are currently redhanded. The problem is that the cheaters are easily caught. Two students with exactly the same misspelling, misalignments, incorrect data entered, submiting the identical papers is the typical scenario. The main question is "Are we only punishing the dumb ones?" The smart cheaters would not be caught. Advice or suggestions? TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:33:16 AM EDT
I have had similar problems in geology classes with similar types of evidence. They claimed "it was ok in high school". I suggest confronting them with the evidence and tell them that the next time it is expulsion for academic dishonesty. That will stop most of them as that blotch can't be removed from their academic record. Nip this in the bud now, otherwise they may go into politics![}:D]
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:37:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:43:34 AM EDT
TheRedGoat, you don't consider 12 out of 24 (50% when I took math) to be "rampant?" I cannot believe that many are willing to cheat, although I know it's a lot more prevalent today than it used to be. Anyone who would lie to you, or steal from you, (cheating is both) isn't worth knowing, IMO, and should [b]definitely not[/b] be allowed to succeed. I think the 2d choice is good as well. Good luck trying to get these clowns back on the straight and narrow!
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:46:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Rockdoc: I have had similar problems in geology classes with similar types of evidence. They claimed "it was ok in high school". I suggest confronting them with the evidence and tell them that the next time it is expulsion for academic dishonesty. That will stop most of them as that blotch can't be removed from their academic record. Nip this in the bud now, otherwise they may go into politics![}:D]
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I will bring up the expulsion angle with the dean. ColonelKlink, option #2 is the current rule. I tried option #1 in the Fall and it did not work. Thank you both for your advice. TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:48:37 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ChuckT: TheRedGoat, you don't consider 12 out of 24 (50% when I took math) to be "rampant?"
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I had 6 sections in the Spring. Only one class had cheaters in it. Currently, out of two sections, only one has cheaters. I guess rampant might not be the word. Ridiculous is the right word. The people paid to LEARN something. TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:58:58 AM EDT
Option 4: Drop them from the class unilaterally (Possible here in the U of MO system, don't know about where you're at). Submit them and evidence to whatever student diciplinary committee (or whatever you call it) and let them decide if any other action is necessary. FOTBR
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:19:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By FanoftheBlackRifle: Option 4: Drop them from the class unilaterally (Possible here in the U of MO system, don't know about where you're at). Submit them and evidence to whatever student diciplinary committee (or whatever you call it) and let them decide if any other action is necessary. FOTBR
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Unless they are a clear disciplinary problem/disturbance I can not drop them. I am getting the impression that we are correct to enforce a strict policy. I will speak with the dean again this afternoon. He has been 100% supportive of my policy. We both want students to be successful, but we do not want to be doormats. I fail to see why the students should be "warned" after being caught. This is not first grade. They already know it is wrong before they get here. My syllabus covers the issue with an entire page of information regarding cheating. TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:25:00 PM EDT
TheRedGoat: This used to make my blood boil during college. I once caught a fellow student cheating during and exam and told him (rather loudly, I might add), "Stop cheating!" This gathered the attention of the grad student proxies who came over to tell me that if I disturbed the test again, I would receive a zero. Nice. The smug look on the cheaters face nearly inspired me to violence. Grrrrrr. -White Horse
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:26:52 PM EDT
I absolutely hate cheaters and have seen plenty of them as I spent quite a few years teaching computer science and math classes. I always went with option 2, but made sure I had plenty of evidence to back up my decision as the school administration was not to keen on making students feel like cheaters (PC bullshit).
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:29:43 PM EDT
What does the syllabus say the penalty is for cheating? In my experience, there is a "statement of intellectual honesty" that the students must sign, and breaking it, by cheating, means they are expelled. Nuke'em. Cheating is a "clear disciplinary problem".
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:33:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Lord_Grey_Boots: What does the syllabus say the penalty is for cheating?
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Cheating Policy Students are expected to uphold the school’s standard of conduct relating to academic honesty. Students assume full responsibility for the content and integrity of the academic work they submit. The guiding principle of academic integrity shall be that a student's submitted work, examinations, reports, and projects must be that of the student's own work. Students shall be guilty of violating the honor code if they: 1. Represent the work of others as their own. 2. Use or obtain unauthorized assistance in any academic work. 3. Give unauthorized assistance to other students. 4. Modify, without instructor approval, an examination, paper, record, or report for the purpose of obtaining additional credit. 5. Misrepresent the content of submitted work. The penalty for violating the honor code is severe. Any student violating the honor code is subject to receive no score for the work and/or a failing grade for the course. If a student is unclear about whether a particular situation may constitute an honor code violation, the student should meet with the instructor to discuss the situation in advance. For this class, it is permissible to assist classmates in general discussions of computing techniques. General advice and interaction are encouraged. Each person, however, must develop his or her own solutions to the assigned projects, assignments, and tasks. In other words, students may not "work together" on graded assignments. Such collaboration constitutes cheating. A student may not use or copy (by any means) another's work (or portions of it) and represent it as his/her own. If you need additional help on an assignment, contact your instructor or the tutor coordinator
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:38:44 PM EDT
Beyond a doubt, kicking them out is the proper policy. Yeah, it's work on you to prove it, but it should be. That's a built-in safeguard that prevents the powers that be from overstepping their authority. Anything less isn't fair to those that honestly work. It also reflects poorly on your institution if you allow cheating, turn a blind eye, or have some slap on the wrist. Sure, you're not going to get them all, but you should get as many as you can. Ross
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 12:58:29 PM EDT
While I strongly agree with option #2--kicking them out, it may wind up not being practical. I don't know what your administrations policy is on appeals, but I am thinking that enough whining will get them reinstated for cheating on an assignment. My suggestion: 1. Tell the entire class to be there on a specific day (assuming attendance is not mandatory). 2. Have the Dean show up on that date. 3. Inform the class slowly and carefully that Cheating has been detected. It is against policy, and those caught are receiving "Zero" on that assignment. Inform the class that if it occurs again, you will kick any students involved (regardless of if it is the person who did the work, or copied the work done) out of the class. 4. The Dean will stand up and inform the class that the policy is acceptable, and no appeals will be allowed if evidence is presented of cheating. 5. Hand back the papers of all the students with "Zero" (preferably in large [b][red]RED[/red][/b] letters) written on the papers that had evidence of cheating. AFARR
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 1:33:22 PM EDT
I've been interviewing and hiring software types for about ten years now, my perspective is "Hey, let 'em cheat." The industry will punish them more than you ever will. You might point out to them that no place they want to work at is going to hire them based solely on grades or degree. That's what may get them an interview, but I don't know anyone that trusts grades alone. I don't. My interviews go all day, and when we're done, I've got a really good idea if the candidate actually learned anything in school. Interviewed one guy just out of school not long ago, he looked good on paper, had a 4 year CompSci degree from a good school, good grades. I stopped the interview after an hour, walked him out the door and told him he'd just pissed away the last four years of his life, because he hadn't learned jack. And, as it happened, I apparently wasn't the first person to have told him that. I know he's still looking for work. The cheaters may think they're putting on over on you, but it'll catch up to them when they start interviewing.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 1:48:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By BoweryBoy: I've been interviewing and hiring software types for about ten years now, my perspective is "Hey, let 'em cheat." The industry will punish them more than you ever will. You might point out to them that no place they want to work at is going to hire them based solely on grades or degree. That's what may get them an interview, but I don't know anyone that trusts grades alone. I don't. My interviews go all day, and when we're done, I've got a really good idea if the candidate actually learned anything in school. Interviewed one guy just out of school not long ago, he looked good on paper, had a 4 year CompSci degree from a good school, good grades. I stopped the interview after an hour, walked him out the door and told him he'd just pissed away the last four years of his life, because he hadn't learned jack. And, as it happened, I apparently wasn't the first person to have told him that. I know he's still looking for work. The cheaters may think they're putting on over on you, but it'll catch up to them when they start interviewing.
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I agree with your perspective. The real world will sort them out.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 1:53:54 PM EDT
The Naval Academy has a very effective policy on cheating, so if I were to cheat, I'd get "separated" from the academy. If 12 ppl cheated on ANYTHING they would all be booted and it would go down as a major scandal. Now that is the type of place I want to be associated with!
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:00:09 PM EDT
There is a counter perspective to this. "Cheating" is also the mark of intelligence, and a response to systems and syllibi that are substandard. The more intelligent a student is the more likely he will seek an alternative to repetition, and menial intellectual tasks. These students may be expressing a discontent with the challenges presented, and the bar needs to be raised to a level where they are emancipated from boredom. The brightest minds are frequently driven to outright withdrawl from organized acedemia due to its ponderous and repetitious memorization and recall regurgitations. One of the best Teachers I ever had ENCOURAGED cheating. His belief was that all means necessary should be employed to obtain a presented goal- obsessive storage simply bogs the minds powers of analysis and computation, and knowing the answers was less important that knowing how to get them. He also provided very difficult project tasks, and "cheating" is really just another term for collaboration- a sought after quality in any team.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:21:43 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:35:57 PM EDT
Just out of curiosity, what kind of computer class is this ?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:39:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Grock: There is a counter perspective to this. "Cheating" is also the mark of intelligence, and a response to systems and syllibi that are substandard.
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Seriously, if you were to meet the students that are being caught, you would retract this statement. These people are living proof that "Two half wits do NOT make a whole wit." While I agree that cheating denotes some level of intellect, the methods used represent laziness, not inspired thinking. How intelligent is it to select "2" copies prior to printing? As for the syllabi and system being substandard, this is an entry level computer class required for all degree plans. It is meant to be a simple, non-threatening introduction to the basics of using Microsoft Office applications. The skills learned here, while not rocket science, should enable a student to perform well in completing tasks in other courses (term papers, accounting assignments, presentations, etc.) TheBeeKeeper1, I agree with your thinking. I have clearly listed the acceptable and unacceptable behavior and the consequences for the latter. I will continue to enforce the standard. TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:41:09 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Philadelphia_GunMan: Just out of curiosity, what kind of computer class is this ?
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You must have been reading my mind. Description below your question... TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:45:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2002 3:04:54 PM EDT by DsrtEgl50]
My CS professors that were concerned about cheating always took the points that assignment was worth, and put them on a test question about the assignment... Of course, tests were taken in a large room with students spread out and with close supervision - very little room to cheat on the test... Some of the time it was very difficult to answer the test questions, because we would have to re-write an entire lab that took most of us in upwards of 6-12 hours (tests were 50 or 75 mins, final was 120 mins). The professors take on it was that if we wrote it before, we already know what to write on the test. If you cheated before, you wont have time to solve the problem. I do believe our school code is expulsion for academic dishonesty, the most common thing that happens though is an F for the course (and in the blatent example one of my EE classes provided, minority groups are overlooked because we dont graduate enough of them to fill quota... so they cheat all they care to without recourse[pissed][puke]) [ Edited to say that this wouldn't work in a basic computer course... damn my taking forever to type out what I want to say :) ] Jonathan
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 2:46:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By BoweryBoy: I've been interviewing and hiring software types for about ten years now, my perspective is "Hey, let 'em cheat." The industry will punish them more than you ever will. You might point out to them that no place they want to work at is going to hire them based solely on grades or degree. That's what may get them an interview, but I don't know anyone that trusts grades alone. I don't. My interviews go all day, and when we're done, I've got a really good idea if the candidate actually learned anything in school. Interviewed one guy just out of school not long ago, he looked good on paper, had a 4 year CompSci degree from a good school, good grades. I stopped the interview after an hour, walked him out the door and told him he'd just pissed away the last four years of his life, because he hadn't learned jack. And, as it happened, I apparently wasn't the first person to have told him that. I know he's still looking for work. The cheaters may think they're putting on over on you, but it'll catch up to them when they start interviewing.
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I agree with your perspective. The real world will sort them out.
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No it won't. They'll just find government jobs.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:05:31 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2002 3:06:06 PM EDT by IMHO]
Is it not included in the honor code that you have an obligation to report the academic dishonesty?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:08:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By IMHO: Is it not included in the honor code that you have an obligation to report the academic dishonesty?
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Was this addressed to me? If so, yes, but you can also counsel them instead unlike USMA. I'll elaborate but I'm not sure who you're asking...
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:16:38 PM EDT
Originally Posted By DaveTX:
Originally Posted By IMHO: Is it not included in the honor code that you have an obligation to report the academic dishonesty?
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Was this addressed to me? If so, yes, but you can also counsel them instead unlike USMA. I'll elaborate but I'm not sure who you're asking...
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I think he is talking to you.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:18:54 PM EDT
Their butt + Your foot + The door ------------- The right thing to do. Kharn
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:21:36 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Kharn: Their butt + Your foot + The door ------------- The right thing to do. Kharn
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ROFLMAO
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:44:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 3:53:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mojo: IMO, #2, and if not then #1. It is sucked to go to your own class and see a word "cheater" invisibly stamped on cheaters' forehead.
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What I do NOT want is the reputation for being soft/easy on cheating. There is only 1 full time CompSci faculty member...me! If Computer Science at our campus develops a bad reputation it is MY reputation too! I want my program to be known as challenging, rewarding and respected. I have only been here for a year, so I guess the cheating problem was ignored in the past. The previous 'part time' faculty never had any cheaters... [>:/] TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:17:34 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat: These people are living proof that "Two half wits do NOT make a whole wit." this is an entry level computer class required for all degree plans. It is meant to be a simple, non-threatening introduction to the basics of using Microsoft Office applications.
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If you have to cheat in a class devoted to Microsoft Office, you don't belong in an "institution of higher learning," you just belong in an institution.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:21:51 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Zak:
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat: These people are living proof that "Two half wits do NOT make a whole wit." this is an entry level computer class required for all degree plans. It is meant to be a simple, non-threatening introduction to the basics of using Microsoft Office applications.
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If you have to cheat in a class devoted to Microsoft Office, you don't belong in an "institution of higher learning," you just belong in an institution.
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So true, so sad... Hard to keep from laughing while my students take their exam tonight!
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:38:37 PM EDT
As I've said, higher learning is a misnomer for many colleges. What we need is something like the German university system. Our secondary education system isn't designed to prepare people for university, which is why you have so many idiots in college. Our secondary school system is designed to integrate immigrants, teach civics, and provide a bare minimum of required education. That is not sufficient in today's economy, heading into the 21st century. Consider how many PhDs and researchers are foreign born, that's a problem. We need secondary schools that actually prepare students for higher education and truly develop their intellectual potential. More money isn't the answer, we have to change the fundamental approach to secondary education in this country.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 4:56:19 PM EDT
Would it be possible to line them up and shoot them?
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 5:05:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thumbtrap: Would it be possible to line them up and shoot them?
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Really a great idea. However, I say we let them take off running. Much more interesting! jz02 I agree TheRedGoat
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 5:42:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 5:51:13 PM EDT
Originally Posted By thebeekeeper1: I thought about this while driving to an appt.--I have to work too--and I kept coming around to your point here: you cannot let this slide without it reflecting poorly on [i]your[/i] character. That part really stinks--someone [b]else[/b] cheats and you are faced with a moral quandry. I am glad you have the guts (am I supposed to say "intestinal fortitude" to a prof.?) to ruthlessly implement your own policy, and that of the school. We need more teachers, at all levels, like you. Keep up the good work--your worthwhile students will appreciate it for their lifetime. Screw the slackers/losers.
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Thank you for your kind words.
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:12:36 PM EDT
I tried a Google search on the correct terms but failed. So here goes off of the top of my head: I remember that the military uses a method called Parakeet(?) to detect leaks in security. You tell different people unique pieces of info. Then you can tell by the info coming back in where the leak originated. So in Computer Science it may be easy to give an equivalent test that is unique to each student by variying a single or two parameters, such that the question/method is identical but the results are unique and coded to the student ID number. A duplicate answer is then traced to both the source and the copycats. The source may get off, but the copycat should not be able to. Maybe you can get a publication on the methodology too, another feather in your hat!
Link Posted: 6/19/2002 11:50:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/19/2002 11:50:58 PM EDT by DVDTracker]
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 12:11:31 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 1:01:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2002 1:04:07 AM EDT by prk]
Can you retest them in separate rooms? May be impractical. Or perhaps they need an oral exam, or an opportunity to demonstrate their vast knowledge in front of the class. Better yet would be to bring in a few students who actually know this stuff to embarrass their asses off.
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 1:58:00 AM EDT
Monmouth College had a policy when I was there that cheating and plagiarism always resulted in a zero for the course the first time. The second time the student was expelled and could not return to Monmouth. As far as we students were concerned, at least, teachers had no say in this except whether they chose to report cheaters. Once a teacher reported you, you could appeal it or accept the punishment. It was coming; there was no cajoling or pleading. You have a valid point about punishing the dumb cheaters and letting the smart ones go, but that's beyond your control. If they're too smart to get caught, they're too smart, and letting the others off the hook won't change that. Eventually they'll run into a problem they can't cheat on and get knocked on their butts, but you can't help that. It's just the way life works.
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 4:08:57 AM EDT
As my VB and C++ teacher said many times, "Live by cut and paste DIE by cut and paste!" Just give them a final exam that will separate the men from the boys.
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 4:28:20 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By BoweryBoy: I've been interviewing and hiring software types for about ten years now, my perspective is "Hey, let 'em cheat." The industry will punish them more than you ever will. You might point out to them that no place they want to work at is going to hire them based solely on grades or degree. That's what may get them an interview, but I don't know anyone that trusts grades alone. I don't. My interviews go all day, and when we're done, I've got a really good idea if the candidate actually learned anything in school. Interviewed one guy just out of school not long ago, he looked good on paper, had a 4 year CompSci degree from a good school, good grades. I stopped the interview after an hour, walked him out the door and told him he'd just pissed away the last four years of his life, because he hadn't learned jack. And, as it happened, I apparently wasn't the first person to have told him that. I know he's still looking for work. The cheaters may think they're putting on over on you, but it'll catch up to them when they start interviewing.
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I agree with your perspective. The real world will sort them out.
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Really?? They will probably just get a job working at some level of .gov!
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 5:12:36 AM EDT
Im a high school teacher and its not ok to cheat in high school. I don't do anything unless I can submit absolute proof. If they are cheating, I just bide my time until I can gather the proof. They will get sloppy in time, and until then, I grade their papers with a vengeance and point out each part that they cheated on without calling it cheating. When I do catch them I make copies... I keep original on file. copy sent home in mail with note...not on school letterhead. Copy with cheaters cohorts on file. Copy sent with discipline referral to office. Zero given on assignment, regardless of its worth. I once photocopied a girls hand as proof. We get a lot of the "we were working together" because of the "cooperative learning" being taught in the middle and high school... so we who really teach have to be very specific about assignment guidelines. Tests are a no-brainer, but I explain no working together anyway.
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 5:13:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2002 5:17:35 AM EDT by Energizer]
At least you are doing something about it! I caught several ACM members doing some organized cheating (supported by some of the profs), and when I confronted them, with one of the profs, the prof ignored it. Cheaters piss me off, and in this situation I am about to tell you about, they threw the curve. All of the cheaters (more than 4) received 100's or upper 90's, and I had an 89. The curve stayed at 100. I told the prof that they had an exact copy of his test-- he said that is impossible since he rotates the tests. Well, the next test, I asked an ACM member for their cheat sheet as they were leaving (it was again, an exact copy of the test) and I confronted the prof with it while they were handing in tests. He said that they were lucky to guess which test he was going to give (2nd time they were right) and he will do nothing since cheat sheets are allowed, but he will make sure the next tests are not the same. I confronted the department, and they all didn't care, and supported it!!!! I got a copy of the next tests from an ACM member, and guess what-- they were the same, including the FINAL!!!!! A lot of cheaters get through college, with high grades. ACM supported them, and provided them with the connections to get copies of the tests. Then they get out in the world and get high paying jobs (taking them away from the hard workers cus they have the grads...), and they may fail in many jobs, until they find a place (which is not hard) that will cover for them, or retrain them on their proprietary software and equipment.
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 5:19:32 AM EDT
Originally Posted By TheRedGoat:
Originally Posted By DaveTX:
Originally Posted By IMHO: Is it not included in the honor code that you have an obligation to report the academic dishonesty?
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Was this addressed to me? If so, yes, but you can also counsel them instead unlike USMA. I'll elaborate but I'm not sure who you're asking...
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I think he is talking to you
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The question was originally addressed to TheRedGoat, but upon closer reading of his school's "Cheating Policy", it seems that there is no written obligation. The two-way responsibility always has been an inherent part of the policy for me . . .
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 5:23:13 AM EDT
One CS prof of mine had an interesting cheating policy. He wouldn't give the cheaters a zero. He assigned them a "fair" grade. He'd take the grade the assigment earned, then divide that by the number of people who turned it in. [:)] Functionally, though, it was giving a failing grade on the assignment, so differs little in application. Maybe a compromise between failing them for the class and a zero on the assigment might be some sort of a penalty on the next test. If they were really dedicated, they MIGHT be able to recover from such a thing... Viper Out
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 7:00:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/20/2002 7:01:51 AM EDT by NOVA5]
Originally Posted By AFARR: ... 3. Inform the class slowly and carefully that Cheating has been detected. It is against policy, and those caught are receiving "Zero" on that assignment. Inform the class that if it occurs again, you will kick any students involved (regardless of if it is the person who did the work, or copied the work done) out of the class. ... AFARR
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So your saying that if someone takes/uses your code without your consent/knowledge it is ok to punish you? as happens in computer class PCs can be setup with shares where the floppy disk and CDroms are made available across the network. users can then "steal" the code right off the disk without the creators even knowing it. seems really fair to me. apply the same to this situation. someone steals your car and runs amuck killing 10 people with it. they can then convict you for murder because you let the crook steal your car. fair isnt it?
Link Posted: 6/20/2002 7:41:57 PM EDT
Nova, The kind of basic class that TRG is talking about is not about code sharing, but about basic computer skills. If someone is using the computer across the network to steal their classmates work, they probably wouldn't be in the basic computer class. To me this is more like LOANING your car to your obviously drunk friend so he can go out for a joyride. He then kills someone--what responsibility do you have? If anything, Warning the class about cheating may make them think more about security--a valuable lesson in itself. AFARR
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