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1/16/2020 9:48:49 PM
Posted: 1/16/2015 1:55:57 PM EST
I have a couple workbenches that I am putting together for cleaning/assembling and reloading and wanted some advice on using threaded inserts to swap out my single stage press on one and vice on the other. I have limited room on the workbenches, each is 4 feet long, and I also want to be able to put up the equipment since the room shares access with the laundry room. Has anyone done this?



The top is a 1 1/2" thick butcher block so I was wondering if threaded inserts that don't go all the way through would be able to hold the pressure from both a vice and reloading press. I'm new to reloading and only have a single stage but see possible blue kool-aid in my future. If I upgraded to a dillon with a strong mount in the future could I use the threaded inserts?

I'd rather not drill all the way through the table or permanently attach anything but I will if it's the only viable option.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 2:33:21 PM EST
My press and powder measure are permanently attached to my bench, as is a 4" bench vice (at the opposite end).
But I have mounted "hard points" into my bench for my trimmer and my little "lathe" for primer pocket uniforming. These are stainless steel fender washers that I have inlayed flush into the top surface of my bench. I drill a thru hole for the screws, epoxy square nuts to receive them into recesses underneath the bench, and with a spade bit and a hand drill (mounted in a portable drill press attachment) I drill a seat about 1/16" deep for the fender washer (it gets epoxied into the seat).
This way, I can mount and dismount tools without gradually digging unsightly "divits" into the surface of my bench.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 2:38:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Coolio:
My press and powder measure are permanently attached to my bench, as is a 4" bench vice (at the opposite end).
But I have mounted "hard points" into my bench for my trimmer and my little "lathe" for primer pocket uniforming. These are stainless steel fender washers that I have inlayed flush into the top surface of my bench. I drill a thru hole for the screws, epoxy square nuts to receive them into recesses underneath the bench, and with a spade bit and a hand drill (mounted in a portable drill press attachment) I drill a seat about 1/16" deep for the fender washer (it gets epoxied into the seat).
This way, I can mount and dismount tools without gradually digging unsightly "divits" into the surface of my bench.
View Quote
Very interesting setup. Sounds pretty nice. I might have to try something similar on my bench sometime.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 2:52:24 PM EST
Options for multiple mounts include T-track, threaded inserts and more.

Pic heavy thread with t-track

I used t-track when I built my bench, and like it. I'd probably do threaded inserts if I had to do it over again because I don't really move my presses much.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 3:24:30 PM EST
Short answer, nope. Eventually those threaded inserts will work themselves loose. You either need to use T Track which is far more invasive than a couple of small holes.

My presses are mounted to to 1 1/4" thick bases that lock over the front edge of my bench. The bases have 2 holes drilled in each. I have 2 holes drilled in my bench. Everything matches up. Doesnt matter what kind of press it it, because they are attached to a base. I can post some pics later if your interested.
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 4:01:54 PM EST
I am not quite as high tech as thread inserts. My presses on one table are mounted on Inline fabrication smart mounts and then screwed into 3/4 plywood. I can swap presses or have a clean bench top by using a pair of c clamps.


Link Posted: 1/16/2015 5:43:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 5:54:43 PM EST
I don't think putting them in the top is a good idea.

When I did mine, I used threaded inserts at the BOTTOM of a thru-hole. I don't think there's any way you could pull a threaded insert all the way thru the top. I does seem plausible to rip them out if they are only threaded into the top surface.

Link Posted: 1/16/2015 6:26:09 PM EST
Here's what I did so I wouldn't have 50 holes in my work bench..

I cut multiple 2x10s into 16 inch sections. I drilled 3 mounting holes into the same locations in all 2x10 sections.

I then mounted my press to one, my vise to one, trimmer to one, etc etc. I use carriage bolts, fender washers, and wing nuts to secure the blocks.

There is also a 16 inch section of 2x4 glued to the bottom of my bench that the carriage bolts also go through for extra support.



Link Posted: 1/16/2015 7:11:43 PM EST
[Last Edit: 1/17/2015 2:07:23 PM EST by GWhis]
Here is an unusual but very clever way Ed Alger uses tee bolts and tee track. Instead of setting track in the bench top....track tool bases.....http://s12.photobucket.com/user/ealger/media/BenchHolddown002.mp4.html

I wouldn't recommend the method for press mounting, as strength is only as strong as the small screws holding the track to the board. But for peripheral tools it's nice and clean! One bolt in one hole is cleaner than a bunch of holes in the bench. I like the option of swiveling the tool any angle before it it tightened. I may have used this had I thought of it. What I used on my bench swager, I'll post when I find the pictures. More holes a little less clean, but it works well.



Link Posted: 1/16/2015 7:33:31 PM EST
Inline Fabrication makes a product that is a steel plate, designed to be flush mounted to a bench, and takes removable top plates to mount presses, vices, and other tools.

I haven't personally used one yet,but I've been doing some looking into them for my limited space reloading area as well:
Here's the base plate: http://inlinefabrication.com/collections/quick-change-press-mounting-system/products/flush-mount-quick-change-system-base-plate
Here's the top plates: http://inlinefabrication.com/collections/quick-change-press-mounting-system/products/quick-change-system-top-plates
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 10:50:22 PM EST
Link Posted: 1/16/2015 11:01:16 PM EST
My workbench is a 5-7/8" thick glulam beam and I didn't feel like drilling all the way through so I epoxied threaded rod couplings into the top. They are quite a bit longer than any threaded inserts I could find at the time so they have plenty of holding strength. Especially after I scored them up a little with a hacksaw. No issues after several years of reloading including sizing a lot of really stubborn 50bmg brass.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 12:32:55 AM EST
You should seriously consider the QuickChange System from Inline Fabrication.

I have an LnL AP with Case feeder, an LnL Classic single stage press, RCBS Bench Primer, Hornady Concentricity Tool, and a vise mounted and in use. Just received a custom made plate from Dan that holds an RCBS Universal Case Prep Center. Each of the tools is stored on wall mounted or side-of-the-bench storage plates, or under the bench when not in use. I just slide the tool I need onto the base plate mounted on my benchtop, and tighten two thumbscrews.

There are several options for mounting the base plate, and I chose top-mounted - just 4 lag screws into the butcher block top.. You could flush-mount it by routing it into the table top, or mount it on a stand . . . there are many other options you can check out. And if the one you want isn't already listed, send Dan an email with what you want. He may already have it, or he will custom make it for you. My Case Prep Center required a 22" long plate with an adjustable support on the far end, and Dan made and shipped it to me for $40.

The plates are industrial-weight and the system works very well. Check it out, it might be the simplest answer for you.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 1:35:31 AM EST
I have 3 stations on my bench that are drilled for Dillon strong mounts which are pairs of holes 9 inches or so front to back and about 10 inches side-side. I don't use the strong mounts, but can if wanted.

My presses are mounted to oak boards which have the hole pattern drilled in them, and I can swap presses as needed. I don't have to worry about drilling any new holes in the countertop, just make new mounting boards. I installed 1/4 Tee nuts underneath and they work great in the Oak countertop.
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 1:46:24 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
<snip>

All of these is the same set of holes. Have 6 or 8 tools I bolt down in this location.

<a href="http://s250.photobucket.com/user/dryflash3/media/Bench/PC050640.jpg.html" target="_blank">http://i250.photobucket.com/albums/gg272/dryflash3/Bench/PC050640.jpg</a>

This is what the bottom of the holes look like. These are 1/4x20 T nuts. http://www.homedepot.com/b/Tools-Hardware-Hardware-Fasteners-Nuts-Tee-Nuts/N-5yc1vZc2a4

So to fasten a tool down I use 2 or 4 1/4 x 20 bolts that thread into the T nuts.
View Quote


+1 on this. The only time I ever had problems was an old turret press that only had 2 offset slots instead of regular holes and I never could get them tight enough to hold it still
For my heavy duty press, I actually sandwiched 2 of these togeather, but in retrospect it was overkill because I didn't know about thread strength. In short, for bolts that small, you get the most strength you are going to get by 2x the bolt diameter's worth of thread engagement [paraphrased, but for a 1/4-20 bolt 2" of threads isn't stronger than 1/2" securely mounted.]
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 2:53:35 AM EST
My next bench or significant upgrade to my current bench will have a full width 1/2" x 4" steel plate inletted into the front edge of the bench, glued with Liquid Nails, and bolted down from the bottom.

It will have two rows of 1/4 x 20 holes on 6" centers to bolt down whatever tool I want, each on its own sub-plate. Nothing will rock or move here. I have no use for flexing workbenches.

My workbench now is a sandwich of 2x4's with 3/4" maple ply wood on either side.



Right now, I have little 4"x8" x 1/4" steel plates I bolt tools down to. It is a good step, but not the ultimate step.

Link Posted: 1/17/2015 10:46:12 AM EST
Can someone add pictures of how their vice is attached to the board. Does the vice attach to the board and then the board attaches to the table or do the bolts that attach the vice to the board go through the table as well?
Link Posted: 1/17/2015 2:21:45 PM EST
Here's the mount that works for me for smaller tools like my bench swager:

The brown furniture fasteners are just to fill the holes when not in use. While this method (using brass thread-in-thread inserts) is fairly clean and very quick to do, its only for smaller tools, not presses requiring a lot of torque. Dryflash3's tee nuts would be better for that. Better still is a permanent mount with a through bolt fender washer and nut.....but if you gotta use the space for other things.....





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