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Posted: 4/28/2011 7:10:45 PM EDT
Are there any troubleshooting tables for the AR?  In other words, when should I consider an extra strength spring rather than a heavier (or lighter) buffer.  Of course this depends on the problem (ftf, fte, etc) but I was just wondering if someone has written down some general guidelines for fixing AR problems.

Link Posted: 4/28/2011 9:12:46 PM EDT
Unless you are using a Chrome-Silicon spring, replace it every 5,000 rounds.



For an M-4 firing 5.56 (as opposed to .223) I would go with the H-2 buffer.



 
Link Posted: 4/29/2011 4:33:48 AM EDT
From troglodyte:

Measure the Action Spring. A rifle length Action Spring should measure between 11 3/4 and 13 1/2 inches and a Carbine length action spring should measure between 10 1/16 and 11 1/4 inches. If the action spring is shorter, replace it immediately.

Use a standard USGI spring and avoid "heavier" action springs. H2 buffers may serve you well also.
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 2:48:35 AM EDT
A dynamic system can be modeled as:

m*a+c*v+k*x=f(t)

m=mass
a=acceleration
c=damping coefficient
v=velocity
k=spring constant
x=position from free spring length
f(t)= input


f(t) and c can be considered constants.
change m and/or k, then the acceleration and velocity will change.

Bust out some Matlab/Simulink if you really want to get fancy.
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 3:40:43 AM EDT



Quoted:


A dynamic system can be modeled as:

m*a+c*v+k*x=f(t)

m=mass

a=acceleration

c=damping coefficient

v=velocity

k=spring constant

x=position from free spring length

f(t)= input

f(t) and c can be considered constants.

change m and/or k, then the acceleration and velocity will change.

Bust out some Matlab/Simulink if you really want to get fancy.






 
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 7:43:04 AM EDT
Quoted:
A dynamic system can be modeled as:

m*a+c*v+k*x=f(t)

m=mass
a=acceleration
c=damping coefficient
v=velocity
k=spring constant
x=position from free spring length
f(t)= input


f(t) and c can be considered constants.
change m and/or k, then the acceleration and velocity will change.

Bust out some Matlab/Simulink if you really want to get fancy.



Isn't f(t) ammo dependent  ... which is the root of all evil with regards to AR malfunctions!  

Link Posted: 4/30/2011 10:57:27 AM EDT
i roll my own.


only had about 2000 rounds through my AR, but not one failure of anytime, and brass lands in a nice neat pile.   its a constant

From calguns.net

Link Posted: 4/30/2011 11:04:03 AM EDT



Quoted:


i roll my own.





only had about 2000 rounds through my AR, but not one failure of anytime, and brass lands in a nice neat pile.   its a constant



From calguns.net



http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/addax/ARejectionpattern.jpg


Interesting picture. I think I'll save that.

 
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 11:22:12 AM EDT
Quoted:

Quoted:
i roll my own.


only had about 2000 rounds through my AR, but not one failure of anytime, and brass lands in a nice neat pile.   its a constant

From calguns.net

http://i216.photobucket.com/albums/cc137/addax/ARejectionpattern.jpg

Interesting picture. I think I'll save that.  


Yeah it's pretty nice. I usually aim for 4:30 using the weakest ammo I shoot, that way I know it'll be 100% reliable plus I'm minimizing felt recoil.
Link Posted: 4/30/2011 12:34:58 PM EDT
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