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Tacked Glock Information (Page 1 of 3)
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Posted: 2/24/2010 6:33:49 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/18/2010 10:39:16 PM EST by EdgecrusherXES_45]
This thread is purely informational please do not comment on this thread unless you have something constructive to add or information that I have given that needs modifying of correcting.  Also if you have something constructive or informational please add on.

Models with C following them stand for Compensated
SF = "Short Frame"
RTF = Rough Texture Frame
L = Long Slide

The full parts list and diagram of the Glock

1. Barrel
2. Channel Liner
3. Connector
4. Extractor
5. Extractor Depressor Plunger
6. Extractor Depressor Plunger Spring
7. Firing Pin
8. Firing Pin Safety
9. Firing Pin Safety Spring
10. Firing Pin Spring
11. Front Sight
12. Guide Rod
13. Locking Block
14. Locking Block Pin
15. Magazine
16. Magazine Base Pad
17. Magazine Body
18. Magazine Catch
19. Magazine Catch Spring
20. Magazine Follower
21. Magazine Insert
22. Magazine Spring
23. Rear Sight
24. Receiver (Frame)
25. Recoil Spring
26. Slide
27. Slide Cover Plate
28. Slide Lock
29. Slide Lock Spring
30. Slide Stop Lever
31. Spacer Sleeve
32. Spring cups
33. Spring-loaded Bearing
34. Trigger Housing Pin
35. Trigger Mechanism Housing with Ejector
36. Trigger Pin
37. Trigger Spring
38. Trigger with Trigger Bar

The differences between the different generations.  Gen 1, 2, 2.5, 3

Gen 1 and 2 were a 2 pin Glocks Gen3 .380/9x19mm Glock's were still 2 pin as late as 2002, thumb rests were added in the Gen3, most Gen 3s were a 3 pen glock with small exception, accessory rail, and with finger groves added to grip.  Gen 2 and 3 both had a rough texture frame.

Gen4

Gen 4 has the removable expandable back straps with no back strap the pistol is smaller then the standard G17 frame with the next size up it is the same size as the G17 and the larger one is the size of the G21 size frames.
The Gen 4 also has a wider opening where the new dual recoil spring sit.  Here is a Gen3 compared to a Gen4


The different sizes of the Glock range from the Full size, Compact and Sub compact.



The difference in size between the G21/20 and the G21SF/20SF


The different textures on the Glock vary the RTF is the texture on the Gen2 and 3.  The RTF2 is the Glock with the curved serration on the slide which feels more like sand paper.
RTF2 Glock with curved serration have been discontinued the new one will all from now on have vertical serration.


For lubing/oiling your Glock their is 6 places you should oil outlined in this picture.


Now we come to the trigger connectors Glock makes a variety of different trigger options.

Glock offers a 8#, 5.5#(stock weight), and 3.5# connector (actually 4.5#)
Glock also offers different trigger springs that increase and decrease weight of the trigger pull.
NY1

With 3.5# connector weight is approximately 6#
With 5.5# connector weight is approximately 8#
Not recommended by Glock to be used with 8# connector.
NY2

With 5.5# connector weight is approximately 12#
6# Trigger spring

Stock weight on this spring is 5# with the heavier spring it speeds up reset of trigger and helps reduce trigger weight.
With 3.5 connector it will get you to achieve that actual 3.5# pull weight on the trigger.

The Magazines have varied over the years with pre-ban mags and mags that were release during the gun ban of 1994 that restricted magazine capacity to 10 rounds.

The new style mags will all have the cut on the front strap of the magazine which allow them to work in the Gen4 mag release when it is in the left handed position and the G21SF with the ambi mag release.


The magazine followers do have different numbers on them denoting the revision of the follower.  The higher the number the newer the magazines will have a higher number I will have to do some research and find pictures of them so I can post.

Glock has also offered two different extractors.  They do have different angles that line up with two different slide styles.
This one is the Loaded chamber indicator version which has the area of metal that is raised up.

This is the original extractor which is smooth.

The Loaded chamber extractor can be added to older generation Glocks without the indicator.
The extractor angles are show here.

Each Extractor also used a different bearing.


For the Glock Models G22/23/24/27 these models can shoot .357Sig with just a barrel replacement.  The same goes for the Glock Model G31/32/33 they can take a .40SW barrel and shoot .40SW.  This conversion does not require different magazines the 40SW mags will work with the .357Sig mags and vise versa.  This should not be done with 9mm barrels in a 40SW/.357Sig setup.

Glock models G22/23/27(40 SW) G31/32/33(.357Sig) models can get conversion barrels that will allow them to shoot 9mm with a 9mm mag and extractor.  Some report running with a 40/357 extractor they have 100% reliability but the two cartridges have different extractors.
This conversion also works with the 10mm to 40SW and .357Sig. (I do not recommend in any way running 40SW though 10mm)
Lone Wolf Distributors list their barrel conversions on their website they do make other ones for no Glock calibers (400 Corbon 9x25 etc etc)

Parts replacement as normal maintenance Glock recommends replacing the recoil spring assembly every 5000rds for .380/9x19mm and every 3000rds for .357Sig/.40SW.

If anyone has anything to add or wants me to correct send me a IM or post add ons to this thread.  This is a Tech thread and I would appreciate people leaving out comments about not liking Glocks and grenade comments thank you.

MOD if you could would you tack this up so it could prevent duplicate threads and redundant threads.
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 6:44:48 PM EST
Excellent post!

Maybe a dumb idea, but could a blurb about converting Glocks to different calibers be listed? i.e., Lone wolf kits, AA conversions, etc.

I see a lot of redundant posts about converting say a G23 to shoot 9mm and whether the extractor should be replaced with the 9mm one etc.

Also, the wide variety of Glock magazines is confusing. The various numbers on the followers on all the mags makes buying used mags kind of dicey for new guys.

Great post though!
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:05:06 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2010 7:11:06 PM EST by GLOCKREAPER]
One thing to note is that the new RTF2 pistols have standard vertical serrations, as the crescent serrations have been discontinued.






Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:10:00 PM EST
Thank you for the info guys keep the revisions coming but quote the part you want changed and how it should be worded.  Thanks again in advance.
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:16:24 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2010 7:24:25 PM EST by EdgecrusherXES_45]
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:
One thing to note is that the new RTF2 pistols have standard vertical serrations, as the crescent serrations have been discontinued.

http://files.me.com/heli/hoxmnd


Thank you for clearing that up I was under the impression that they had discontinued the whole RTF2 line with the new Gen4 being out.


Ohhh and VINI whenever you want to weigh in and let me know what needs to be added or corrected.
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:29:03 PM EST
An important note on extractors. The older Glock's had 90* extractors, the newer (Mid 90's~) Glock's have 15* extractors.





Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:39:37 PM EST
[Last Edit: 6/14/2011 5:34:11 PM EST by GLOCKREAPER]
On .40S&W mags, look on the back of the mag body to the right of the GLOCK logo for a "1" or "2". These are the newer 11 coil magazines designed to fix the rare malfunction problems with tac lights.




Q: Are there Issues Using Tactical Lights on Glock® Pistols?
A: Some Glock® .40 caliber pistols, models 22 and 23, exhibit feeding malfunctions, either nose down or nose up (stovepipe), when used with tactical lights. The problems tend to occur with individual guns, with some pistols becoming totally unreliable while other identical, even close in serial number sequence, guns have no problems. Most models 22 and 23 are reliable.
A sensitive gun may malfunction with any tactical light - the TLRs, the older M models, and even Glock®’s own brand. There is evidence that the problem sometimes develops with use, and may progress until the pistol is unreliable even with no light attached.
On the basis of testing by Streamlight, we believe the problem is magazine related. It appears that the rounds are unable to rise fast enough for proper cycling. We have observed proper feeding for the first few rounds, consistent failures at mid-magazine capacity, and a return to proper feeding of the last few cartridges in the magazine.
We have tried both stronger and weaker recoil springs, and compound-action recoil buffers, all without success. Sometimes new magazine springs, either new Glock® or Wolff, will cure the problem. In one case of a pistol which was totally reliable when new but progressed to malfunctioning on every magazine, even with no light installed, we found two solutions which restored reliability, but which might not be acceptable to some users. The first was using 10 round capacity Glock® magazines. The gun will not cycle reliably with 15 round mags with their steeply stacked columns but works flawlessly with 10 round mags. The second solution was a new magazine follower from Brownells®, their part number 069-000-006. When used in a 15 round magazine with a new spring, reliability was restored. However, the follower would not lock the slide open after the last round.
Ammunition is also a factor with any weapon. Some brands and weights may be totally reliable while others jam repeatedly. Make sure your gun is thoroughly tested with your duty ammo.
Brownells® is a registered trademark of Brownells®, Inc.



Glock® is a registered trademark of GLOCK Gesellschaft mbH.




http://www.streamlight.com/faq/






Originally Posted By HaveBlue83:


On the recoil spring assembly, look on the back of the guide rod for a "1". This is the newer rod made from a modified polymer to prevent melting.
Originally Posted By HaveBlue83:


 
 
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:44:01 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/31/2010 1:01:25 AM EST by GLOCKREAPER]
Here is the RTF chart. RTF3 is what the GEN4 has, as well as some prototype/foreign contract GEN3's have.




 
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 7:56:55 PM EST



Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES_45:




Gen 1 and 2 were a 2 pin Glocks and the Gen 3 was a 3 pen glock, accessory rail, and with finger groves added to grip.  Gen 2 and 3 both had a rough texture frame.



GEN3 .380/9x19mm Glock's were still 2 pin as late as 2002. Also, thumb rests were added in the GEN3 change.



 
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 8:07:22 PM EST
all good but thought the oiling points were off..... never seen an oil point at the base of the barrel but the firing pin safety does have one. otherwise correct.
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 8:23:54 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2010 8:28:03 PM EST by GLOCKREAPER]





Originally Posted By jonnybravo:



all good but thought the oiling points were off..... never seen an oil point at the base of the barrel but the firing pin safety does have one. otherwise correct.





 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGobEpUO3Uc





 
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 8:35:31 PM EST
This excellent and very comprehensive.  Very good job.




Don't know what I can add at the moment, other than the fact that this should ABSOLUTELY be tacked.



I'll contribute if I can, beyond what you guys already have.
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 8:50:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By ViniVidivici:
This excellent and very comprehensive.  Very good job.

Don't know what I can add at the moment, other than the fact that this should ABSOLUTELY be tacked.

I'll contribute if I can, beyond what you guys already have.


+1, I am going to think about what else I could write up and contribute. Basically, I am trying to think of all the questions I first had when I bought my first Glock.

OP: Thanks for doing this!
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 9:26:37 PM EST
Glock models.  


(C/O.D./RTF2/GEN4 options available on select models.)
17 Fullsize 9x19mm





17L 6" 9x19mm





18 Select fire 17





19 Compact 9x19mm





20 Fullsize 10mmAUTO (Short Frame option avaliable.)





21 Fullsize .45ACP
(Short Frame/M1913 rail/ambidextrous mag catch (Discontinued.) option avaliable.)





22 Fullsize .40S&W





23 Compact .40S&W





24 6" .40S&W





25 Compact .380ACP





26 Sub-compact 9x19mm





27 Sub-compact .40S&W





28
Sub-compact .380ACP





29
Sub-compact 10mmAUTO (Short Frame option avaliable.)





30
Sub-compact .45ACP (Short Frame option avaliable.)





31 Fullsize .357SIG





32 compact .357SIG





33
Sub-compact .357SIG





34 Tactical/Practical long slide 9x19mm





35
Tactical/Practical long slide .40S&W





36
Sub-compact Slimline .45ACP





37 Fullsize .45GAP





38 Compact .45GAP





39
Sub-compact .45GAP



 
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 10:43:49 PM EST
Glockreaper I added a full list of models and details on them thank you Wikipedia!
Link Posted: 2/24/2010 10:59:53 PM EST
[Last Edit: 2/24/2010 11:01:59 PM EST by GLOCKREAPER]
Excellent. You should also add to the extractor section the difference in angles as well as needing to replace the spring loaded bearing with the LCI one if they Change to the LCI extractor.






Link Posted: 2/25/2010 12:56:15 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 9:37:11 AM EST by GLOCKREAPER]
When installing the firing pin spring make sure the end with the most coils goes forward, over the spring cups. Also, make sure the split of the cups are oriented as seen in the bottom picture.
From Glocks Armorers Manual Addendum, "Firing Pin Spring...the end with
the most coils goes toward the spring cups" (this is in the parts order
form)

Wrong way:






Right way:

When installing the coil trigger spring be sure that it forms an "S" when viewed from the right side of the frame.

 
 
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 4:12:56 AM EST
Tack this thread!

All I have to offer is that the G19 barrel was redesigned at some point, I believe to fix the NYPD Phase III malfunctions. The new barrel gets the "1" next to the hexagon stamp on the hood.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 4:29:12 AM EST
I'm not sure if this counts, but it is related.



100,000-Round 9mm Torture Test
By Chuck Taylor
On four occasions since 1990, I've written articles about a continuing
evaluation I've been conducting to ascertain the longevity of the Glock
Model 17 9mm pistol. The first of these, appearing in the February,
1993, issue of Combat Handguns, contained my findings as to the
weapon's performance and durability after 33,000 rounds fired. At this
juncture, I stated:
"I carried it in the rain, snow, dust and mud. I carried it when the
temperatures were over 100 degrees and when they were 40 below.
"I presented the gun more than 10,000 times from it's plastic slide
holster, speed loaded it 2,000 times, performed over 5,000 tactical
loads, shot it weak-handed in excess of 2,500 times and field-stripped
it 250 times.
"From the beginning, I resolved to grind it into the dirt, abuse it like no gun I ever had."
"Why? To find out the truth about Glocks, for once and for all...
"And I succeeded in doing just that. In a 30-month period, I fired
33,000 rounds, all factory loads, of every imaginable type made–– and
it ate them all, almost without a single malfunction. I say 'almost'
because on the 32,994th round, I finally had one–– a failure to feed!
And this in spite of the fact that I cleaned the gun every 10,000
rounds whether it need it or not!
"100 rounds short of the 5,000th shot, both factory-provided magazines
ceased to hold the slide open after the last shot, although they both
continued to function normally otherwise. At round number 11,000 a
second set did the same and was replaced by another.
"By the 500th holster presentation, the left side of the front site was
so badly worn that a proper site picture was no longer possible. It was
subsequently replaced with a steel version.
"By round number 16,000, I could see steel through the finish–– but it
never did rust, although it was exposed repeatedly to rain, snow,
perspiration and even blood.
"The trigger pull, originally 5.5 pounds, got smoother and a bit
lighter, but it never did double or demonstrate a glitch of any kind.
"And after all this, it still shoots into 3 inches at 25 meters, not much different than when it was new."
Impressed, to say the least, I was still determined to see the test
though to the point where the gun failed. So, although the piece had
passed the 33,000-round mark without significant negative results or
breakage, I continued the test.
The months went by and the test continued. By the end of the summer,
1993, the gun had shot 50,000 rounds without a hitch. Among my
additional observations published in Glock Auto pistols 1995, were
these:
"And now, after 50,000 rounds, nothing has really changed. It still:
"Functions reliably. In fact, not a single additional stoppage has occurred.
"Prints inside the 9-ring of a 25-meter pistol target, exactly as it did when it was new.
"Shows no additional finish wear.
"Exhibits no bore corrosion.
"Clearly, the Glock M-17 is a heck of a pistol and, as a survival
instrument, is well worthy of our consideration. It is well-designed,
well-made and capable of surviving a wide variety of environmental
conditions. It will feed the entire spectrum of bullet shapes and
functions reliably with virtually all power levels of 9mm ammunition.
In addition, it resists corrosion magnificently and its design causes
minimal wear on working parts, giving it an unbelievable long service
life.
"Ugly? Maybe, maybe not! It depends on what's important to you––
cosmetics, or function. Regardless, it's my opinion that the Glock 17
is not only a winner, but may well be the world's best 9mm pistol.
Obviously, only time will tell, but in the meantime, I've got 25,000
more rounds of 9mm ammunition to run through it to find out."
25,000 more
And the test continued. By February, 1995, the 25,000 rounds were
expended, bringing the total to an unbelievable 75,000! Yet, the gun
was still going strong, showing no indications whatsoever of impending
failure. I replaced nothing–– no springs, firing pins, connectors or
any other parts. In fact, viewed from the broad perspective, the gun
had actually outlived it's magazines–– six two-mag sets at that point.
Truthfully, I had run out of things to do to the gun. Short of running
over it with a car or freezing it into a solid block of ice–– both
which I regarded as silly, since they fail to mirror real-world
conditions and therefore prove nothing–– I had repeatedly exposed the
gun to everything. In the July, 1995, issue of Combat Handguns and
Summer, 1995, issue of Glockster, I said:
"After more than 70,000 holster presentations, I can detect no
additional finish wear from that which appeared by 20,000
presentations.
"The bore is still without corrosion or excessive wear; the piece still
shoots inside the 9-ring of a 25-meter pistol target, using the offhand
Weaver Stance. In fact, to determine if any deterioration of intrinsic
accuracy had occurred, I fired it from 35 meters in a Ransom Rest–– the
worst groups were 2 inches!
"As an example of its practical accuracy capability, I offer the
following. With the test gun, I was able to perform the following:
1. "Reliably get center-hits on a 18 x 30-inch steel silhouette target
at 75 meters, knocking down five such silhouettes in under ten seconds.





2. "Take a whitetail deer with a single shot behind the shoulder at a laser-measured 70 meters.
3. "Successfully pass the ASAA Handgun Combat Master test with it,
presenting it from concealed carry, shooting a score of at least 383
out of a possible 400."
My other observations at that time included:
"Internal parts exhibited no real wear or deterioration.
"The polycarbonate frame, though it had at one spot worn smooth from
holster contact, appeared intact and without discernible deterioration.
"After more than 50,000 speed loads and an equal number of tactical
loads, the magazine well was scarred somewhat but still serviceable.
"While the 56,103rd round blew a primer, the gun was undamaged. The
resulting stoppage, a Type 3 (Feedway) was quickly cleared and the
weapon returned to service.
"The trigger remained at 5.1 pounds, a reduction from it's original
poundage of only 0.4 pounds. It was still smooth and had a crisp
let-off.
"It was discovered that magazine service life could be dramatically
increased by loading only 15, rather than the rated 17, rounds of
ammunition. If a 'Plus-Two' floorplate is utilized, then–– and only
then–– should a full 17 rounds be loaded. This prevents the follower
spring from being fully compressed, thus causing it to soften and
finally 'set', as the expression goes.
"The Trijicon (tritium) sights installed early in the test were still completely serviceable."
It looked like the test was over. The pistol had survived an incredible
75,000 rounds and was completely intact. I had my desired data-base––
the Glock M-17 was irrefutably a terrific pistol. In fact, I was so
impressed that I concluded my article in Combat Handguns with this
statement:
"Pretty, it ain't, especially after all it's been through. On the other
hand, beauty is said to be in the eye of the beholder, and to me, the
Glock is a tool, not an objet d'art. This being the case, we must view
it differently–– function, not aesthetics, is the prime criteria.
Viewed from this perspective, there can be no doubt that the Glock M-17
looks mighty good indeed."
Well, I just couldn't leave it alone. My curiosity about just how long
the gun could survive continued to be intense. So, from my stores, I
broke out an additional 25,000 rounds of assorted 9mm ammo and
continued the test.
And now, the fall of 1995, after having fired a total of 100,000 rounds of virtually all kinds of ammunition...
Nothing has changed! The gun looks the same, feels the same, functions
the same as it did before. I've done everything within reason to this
gun. I've carried it all over the world, quite literally in every
environmental condition known to man–– the steaming jungles of Latin
America, the windblown deserts of the southwestern U.S., the 40-below
zero tundra of Alaska in the winter.
And it worked–– every time. In fact, since I discovered that loading
15, rather than the rated 17, rounds into the magazine prevented the
follower spring from softening, I haven't had a single malfunction.
Both magazines used in this last 25,000 portion of my test remain
strong and completely serviceable. And, by way of confirmation, I
replaced the old springs in the magazines that failed during the test
with new ones from Glock, and they, too, function perfectly.
I am especially impressed by the lack of apparent finish wear, even
after over 100,000 holster presentations. The gun looks exactly as it
did at 20,000! I've actually worn out several holsters, finally
selecting the M-D Labs "Thunderbolt" (which I co designed with M-D
honcho Kevin McClung) and matching mag carrier as the best. It's
super-fast, yet secure and highly concealable, and being made of Kydex,
it's by far the toughest rig now in existence.
The magazine well, although slightly scarred from in excess of 100,000
insertions, also remains entirely functional and looks much like it did
in the early stages of the test.
Internal parts, too, look the same. I just can't find any discernible
signs of deterioration. The piece shoots just as accurately as it did
before and functions flawlessly.
So, in conclusion, the Model 17 9mm continues to defy wear, tear,
corrosion and...well, me! I've thrown the whole book of tricks at this
gun and yet, as this is written, it continues in service. Obviously,
the Model 17 is a terrific handgun–– so terrific that I'd quite
willingly bet my life on this one, even after all it's been through.
What better recommendation can I give, eh?


 
 
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 4:37:17 AM EST
Glock recommends replacing the recoil spring assembly every 5000rds for .380/9x19mm and every 3000rds for .357/.40



Also, if you have an older Glock you should upgrade the springs to the newer matte silver color springs. This is especially important for the trigger spring as the older shiny springs were know to break. The older slide lock spring that is thin in the middle should also be replaced with the newer, even thickness spring, as these too were known to break.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 4:55:55 AM EST

Originally Posted By Sig_Fan:
Maybe a dumb idea, but could a blurb about converting Glocks to different calibers be listed? i.e., Lone wolf kits, AA conversions, etc.
I see a lot of redundant posts about converting say a G23 to shoot 9mm and whether the extractor should be replaced with the 9mm one etc.











To just fire 9mm in your 23 all you need is an aftermarket conversion barrel and a Glock 19 magazine. If you want a full 9mm conversion
you also need a 9mm extractor/spring loaded bearing/trigger
mechanism housing/firing pin. To shoot .357SIG all you need is a factory model 32
barrel/magazine follower (Stock .40 mags work fine however.) and you have a 100% factory model 32 with 23 markings. Reverse this if you're starting with a 32.
 
 
 
 
 
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 8:18:46 AM EST
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By Sig_Fan:

Maybe a dumb idea, but could a blurb about converting Glocks to different calibers be listed? i.e., Lone wolf kits, AA conversions, etc.

I see a lot of redundant posts about converting say a G23 to shoot 9mm and whether the extractor should be replaced with the 9mm one etc.

To just fire 9mm in your 23 all you need is an aftermarket conversion barrel and a Glock 19 magazine. If you want a full 9mm conversionyou also need a 9mm extractor/spring loaded bearing/triggermechanism housing/firing pin. To shoot .357SIG all you need is a factory model 32barrel/magazine follower (Stock .40 mags work fine however.) and you have a 100% factory model 32 with 23 markings. Reverse this if you're starting with a 32.
         


Updated more stuff from the posts.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 10:12:31 AM EST
Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:

Originally Posted By Sig_Fan:

Maybe a dumb idea, but could a blurb about converting Glocks to different calibers be listed? i.e., Lone wolf kits, AA conversions, etc.

I see a lot of redundant posts about converting say a G23 to shoot 9mm and whether the extractor should be replaced with the 9mm one etc.

To just fire 9mm in your 23 all you need is an aftermarket conversion barrel and a Glock 19 magazine. If you want a full 9mm conversionyou also need a 9mm extractor/spring loaded bearing/triggermechanism housing/firing pin. To shoot .357SIG all you need is a factory model 32barrel/magazine follower (Stock .40 mags work fine however.) and you have a 100% factory model 32 with 23 markings. Reverse this if you're starting with a 32.
         


One thing I've discovered with using the mags for a Glock 23 in a 32 is that you can actually get 14 rounds in them.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 10:26:13 AM EST
your extractor pics are the same...
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 10:36:26 AM EST
Possibly something about the difference between a two pin and three pin frame?
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 1:13:24 PM EST
Originally Posted By MattNificent:
your extractor pics are the same...


Fixed
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 1:14:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By KavonTN:
Possibly something about the difference between a two pin and three pin frame?


I know the difference is the Locking block but I am trying to find some detail notes so I can get everything correct if anyone has anything they would like to weigh in let me know.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 3:39:55 PM EST
Great reference thread.

Another vote to get it tacked.
Link Posted: 2/25/2010 7:15:43 PM EST
Originally Posted By k12lts:
Great reference thread.

Another vote to get it tacked.


+1

I'd also maybe show a quick picture comparison of the Smooth & Target Trigger.

Switching to the smooth trigger was the single best "upgrade" to my G19.
Link Posted: 2/26/2010 7:55:58 AM EST
What do we do to get this tacked up?  I IM'ed the MOD and got no reply any ideas guys.
Link Posted: 2/26/2010 11:23:20 AM EST
Great info, thanks!
Link Posted: 2/28/2010 3:44:01 PM EST
BTT, because this still needs to be tacked.
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 3:56:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/1/2010 4:01:04 AM EST by Unicorn]
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 10:31:41 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/1/2010 10:32:04 AM EST by EdgecrusherXES_45]
Anyone got an idea on how to get it tacked otherwise adding more to this thread will become pointless.  Tried messaging the MOD for the Glock forum no reply.
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 12:16:24 PM EST



Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES_45:

Tried messaging the MOD for the Glock forum no reply.


I've never seen the Glock forum MOD post.




 
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 6:39:45 PM EST
here is the upgraded recoil guide rod made of Polymer and stamped with the "1" on the rod.

OP, you can cut and paste this for your section. this is off the GEN3 that I just bought.





lemme know if u need more pics of other stuff.
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 7:01:40 PM EST
Excellent.

Link Posted: 3/1/2010 7:15:29 PM EST
tag
Link Posted: 3/1/2010 11:00:42 PM EST
[Last Edit: 3/1/2010 11:01:35 PM EST by EdgecrusherXES_45]
Anyone know any other way to get this thing tacked?

Otherwise adding more info is kind of pointless.......

Maybe we need to "Report" this thread to get attention brought to it???
Link Posted: 3/2/2010 10:25:47 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/2/2010 11:10:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/2/2010 11:11:10 AM EST by EdgecrusherXES_45]
Originally Posted By Maynard:
I've contacted Staff about this thread and I'm seeing what I can do to get it tacked.


Much appreciated maybe they need to add an MOD to our thread we should nominate someone.

If the thread gets tacked I will continue to add info.
Link Posted: 3/2/2010 2:34:48 PM EST
Originally Posted By EdgecrusherXES_45:
Originally Posted By Maynard:
I've contacted Staff about this thread and I'm seeing what I can do to get it tacked.


Much appreciated maybe they need to add an MOD to our thread we should nominate someone.

If the thread gets tacked I will continue to add info.


I nominate Vini and Maynard as co-mods.
Link Posted: 3/2/2010 2:36:04 PM EST
Originally Posted By Unicorn:
Only a couple minor things to add for those that might be new to Glocks.

Glock stopped calling their "-" connector 3.5 pounds and started calling it 4.5 pounds as it actually is.  If you ever did the math to convert their numbers from metric it always came out to about 4.5lbs!
They also are harder to come by.  Glock's policy is to only sell them directly to law enforcement agencies that sign a liability waiver, and to those who need replacements for the ones in their competition guns like the 17L/24/34/35 and they want the old, damaged one back first.  You can't even order it using the order sheet you get when you attend an armorer's course.

The "C" on some models stands for compensated.  I've met people that didn't know what the C meant.

The Glock branded and labled night sights are warrenteed for 15 years and have the same Tennifer finish as the gun.  The Trijicons are only warrenteed for 10 years.


The part about the night sights is very interesting indeed. 5 extra years of warranty on the brightness? If that is so, then that is a great deal to stick with the Glock branded night sights!
Link Posted: 3/2/2010 2:42:37 PM EST
What about a little blurb in there about the various aftermarket mags, like Scherer, KCi (korean mags), the new Magpul ones, etc. with a disclaimers about which ones people have had the most luck with vs. the ones that are kind of range only mags.
Link Posted: 3/3/2010 10:46:04 AM EST
Link Posted: 3/4/2010 7:12:52 PM EST
WooT! We got a tack.
Link Posted: 3/4/2010 7:42:30 PM EST
WOOT WE GOT A NEW MOD!!!!
Link Posted: 3/4/2010 10:59:50 PM EST
Can this picture be added to the first posting?  



It is a great illustration of the frame sizes.
Link Posted: 3/8/2010 11:44:24 PM EST
"Stock weight on this spring is 5# with the heavier spring it speeds up reset of trigger and helps reduce trigger weight.

With 3.5 connector it will get you to achieve that actual 3.5# pull weight on the trigger. "
Ok this is probably alot simpler than it seems but this section on trigger work is confusing.  What parts would i have to replace in order to get this 3.5# pull (Are these glock parts???) also what about travel reduction?

Link Posted: 3/9/2010 12:24:29 AM EST



Originally Posted By Mountainmalitia:



Ok this is probably alot simpler than it seems but this section on trigger work is confusing.  What parts would i have to replace in order to get this 3.5# pull (Are these glock parts???) also what about travel reduction?



All you need is a 3.5lb. connector for a lighter trigger pull (about 4.5lb.) For a true 3.5lb. pull you would need to install a lighter competition firing pin spring (not recommended for serious use.) To reduce over travel you can install a connector like the Ghost rocket that has a built in over travel stop.



 
Link Posted: 3/9/2010 12:29:14 AM EST




Originally Posted By GLOCKREAPER:





Originally Posted By Mountainmalitia:



Ok this is probably alot simpler than it seems but this section on trigger work is confusing. What parts would i have to replace in order to get this 3.5# pull (Are these glock parts???) also what about travel reduction?



All you need is a 3.5lb. connector for a lighter trigger pull (about 4.5lb.) For a true 3.5lb. pull you would need to install a lighter competition firing pin spring (not recommended for serious use.) To reduce over travel you can install a connector like the Ghost rocket that has a built in over travel stop.



4.5 is plenty for me.  With the ghost rocket will it still be duty worthy or is it more of a range upgrade?

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