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Posted: 1/30/2018 12:11:30 AM EDT
My apologies, as I posted this in another section but only got a few responses, which were good, but I'd like some more feedback.

I'm a little confused when it comes to trigger control. I see that the Army marksmanship Unit and various manuals mention that the trigger finger should fall naturally on the trigger. However, I see on YT a lot that guys preach only pulling the trigger with the pad of your finger, others advocate using the joint. What do you use, and why the discrepancy? Is somebody behind on the times?

Does it even matter? I just can't help but wonder if I am limiting myself by using improper technique.
Link Posted: 1/30/2018 10:08:14 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/7/2018 7:18:14 AM EDT
It does not matter per se. What matters is what works best for you. Using the pad of the finger however is a good place to start.

I have a Sniper on our SWAT Team who pulls the trigger with the crease of the second joint... at first I was but he shoots excellent... so much for the "too much trigger" opinion. For HIM it works.

I've watched many excellent pistol and rifle shooters use different techniques so that's where I base my input.

I've trained with several great instructors such as Pat McNamara, Clay Martin, and Robert "Bob" Keller... none of them insisted on one specific technique. In fact, Mac has a short YT video where he recommends more finger... but like I said, it can most often boil down to what feels and performs best for you.
Link Posted: 5/30/2018 2:19:51 PM EDT
When I first got into shooting back in around 2000 everyone was saying 2 use the first Joint part of your trigger finger to pull the trigger and over the past five or six years I've noticed that they are now teaching to use the beginning pad of your trigger finger. I followed both of those rules and I do prefer using the pad as I feel I have a better feel of the trigger which gives me better control. I have also just recently been hearing that you should make your trigger finger into a l or a 90 degree angle into the trigger which allows you to easily pull the trigger more straight to the rear which I found to be true also so I personally feel that using the pad of the trigger finger is definitely the better form to use
Link Posted: 5/30/2018 4:34:15 PM EDT
If you really want to work on trigger control, then you need to dry fire. a lot...
Link Posted: 5/30/2018 7:08:00 PM EDT
Try it different ways and see what works for you. Lots of variables like trigger type, hand size, grip size, types of shooting etc. You may use different techniques to fit the situation.
Link Posted: 7/3/2018 6:34:32 AM EDT
It's easier to pull the trigger straight back when using the center to end of the last section of your trigger finger.

You've got more nerve endings/better sense of touch/feel in that part of your finger, too.

If you have "too much" trigger finger on the trigger it can lead to your trigger finger contacting the stock/frame. If your finger is making contact with the stock/frame it makes it more likely you will impart some movement to the firearm when pulling the trigger. The rifle shooters called it "dragging wood."
Link Posted: 7/8/2018 7:20:57 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Bowhntr6pt:
It does not matter per se. What matters is what works best for you. Using the pad of the finger however is a good place to start.

I have a Sniper on our SWAT Team who pulls the trigger with the crease of the second joint... at first I was but he shoots excellent... so much for the "too much trigger" opinion. For HIM it works.

I've watched many excellent pistol and rifle shooters use different techniques so that's where I base my input.

I've trained with several great instructors such as Pat McNamara, Clay Martin, and Robert "Bob" Keller... none of them insisted on one specific technique. In fact, Mac has a short YT video where he recommends more finger... but like I said, it can most often boil down to what feels and performs best for you.
View Quote
This
Everyones hands are different sizes.
Place it where it works
Link Posted: 7/20/2018 12:45:26 PM EDT
The important part is that the trigger finger is moving straight to the rear when it breaks without the finger applying left or right pressure. Where the finger contacts the trigger face will vary depending on the size of the shooter's hand, grip size, and distance from trigger to grip. Generally, the longer the trigger reach, the less finger will be on the trigger and vice versa.

For example I place the trigger in the middle of the first pad of the trigger finger when using a 1911 but the first knuckle on most striker-fired guns like the Glock and M&P. My M&P with a Forward Set Sear trigger that lengthens the trigger reach is between those positions.
Link Posted: 9/7/2018 10:29:52 PM EDT
I have learned to put as much finger on the trigger as possible and can really slow down the trigger; which results in excellent shot placement. This really shows when you reduce stability and shoot off hand only at distance. IMHO there is no such thing as "too much finger on the trigger" and "Going slow on the trigger" is the ultimate factor on determing weather you hit or miss the target.
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