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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 7/21/2014 2:32:44 PM EST
I am looking into getting the sport but I torn at which direction would be the more fun route. I hear stories of IPDA being too rule driven now, and that 3 Gun has a higher entry cost. I have all the weapons I need but a shotgun, I have never been a huge shotgun guy except to qualify while active duty. Any advice or stories would be appreciated!
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 2:42:08 PM EST
I would suggest you find a local club and start shooting pistol first (low entry cost, just one gun to master). USPSA is the most prolific, but see which discipline is most available in your area. Once you have some experience, you can look into 3-Gun.
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 2:51:33 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/21/2014 2:59:27 PM EST by KILLERB6]
The thing I like about IDPA is that it revolves around using a normal EDC handgun and gear in what are typically "routine" scenarios.

There are no race guns, no fancy holsters and mag carriers...just what you would normally CCW with. So you're training with you're actual gear in relatively realistic scenarios.

I can't speak to the other variants but IDPA rules are pretty transparent. Granted, I shoot with a small group (typically 5-6 groups of 6-8 shooters) but it is fairly informal and I didn't even read any of the rules for my first match (still haven't). Just showed up with my 1911, a couple of extra mags (which I carried in my pocket) and ammo.
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 2:56:55 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 3:05:40 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
The thing I like about IDPA is that it revolves around using a normal EDC handgun and gear in what are typically "routine" scenarios.

There are no race guns, no fancy holsters and mag carriers...just what you would normally CCW with. So you're training with you're actual gear in relatively realistic scenarios.
View Quote


With respect, your comments are VERY outdated. Nowadays you can do the same in USPSA. Anyone can bring their EDC pistol and compete on a level playing field in Production division - no "raceguns" allowed. The courses of fire in USPSA are slightly more elaborate and allow more creativity in problem solving, but for a beginner either discipline would be equally accessible. The main consideration is which is more readily available and active in the OPs locale.
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 3:17:53 PM EST
Originally Posted By gumbi17:
I am looking into getting the sport but I torn at which direction would be the more fun route. I hear stories of IPDA being too rule driven now, and that 3 Gun has a higher entry cost. I have all the weapons I need but a shotgun, I have never been a huge shotgun guy except to qualify while active duty. Any advice or stories would be appreciated!
View Quote


Both are really fun, and i'd encourage you to get into both if you can. I've gravitated towards USPSA because i like the rules a bit better....but that's just me. You may find you like one better than the other as well, only way to find out is to shoot it.

Link Posted: 7/21/2014 3:29:48 PM EST
Whats the difference's in the rules that are different? I know they mention of sights, but a friend of mine said a team mate of his at a IDPA meet was DQ'ed for having his knee brace showing after his surgery. They said it was something about it had to be covered, even though it was a medical knee brace? That kind of makes me wonder how strict the IDPA rules are. That is my biggest question!
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 3:36:11 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 9:54:05 PM EST
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Originally Posted By SxPxDx:
There are going to be dickheads in everything. Don't let that sour the taste of any of them as a whole.
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Just in general, in life, there are dickheads every where....especially at work.

My range time or rather when I used to shoot matches every weekend, that was like my vacation, my reprieve from the dickheads I am forced to work with Monday through Friday.

Then I became a match director....at least what I noticed with the USPSA'ers, they are the biggest bunch of whiney babies, and heaven forbid you ask for a little help setting up for matches or tearing down....weeelllll....shhhitttt....you might as well be asking for the fillings out of their teeth.

And what was typical was the biggest complainers were the ones who never helped out.

The other downside to shooting matches was you would piss away 3 to 4 hours at the range to do maybe a minute to two minutes total of actual shooting time. I would much rather spend the time alone on the range.... all by myself... no dickheads to screw with me.

Then you thrown in that everybody thinks there is a brand new Chevy pick up on the line at every local match. I would fat finger a score in EZWinScore, thinking I had everything squared away, and then email the results out. Pffttt...30 seconds after people got the results they would be calling me up telling me what score or points I screwed up punching in.

Seriously, there was a point there where I pictured going back in time to when all these USPSA'ers were in junior high and high school, and I could definitely picture all of them nit picking each other while playing Dungeons and Dragons.






Link Posted: 7/21/2014 9:57:23 PM EST
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Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:


With respect, your comments are VERY outdated. Nowadays you can do the same in USPSA. Anyone can bring their EDC pistol and compete on a level playing field in Production division - no "raceguns" allowed. The courses of fire in USPSA are slightly more elaborate and allow more creativity in problem solving, but for a beginner either discipline would be equally accessible. The main consideration is which is more readily available and active in the OPs locale.
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Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
The thing I like about IDPA is that it revolves around using a normal EDC handgun and gear in what are typically "routine" scenarios.

There are no race guns, no fancy holsters and mag carriers...just what you would normally CCW with. So you're training with you're actual gear in relatively realistic scenarios.


With respect, your comments are VERY outdated. Nowadays you can do the same in USPSA. Anyone can bring their EDC pistol and compete on a level playing field in Production division - no "raceguns" allowed. The courses of fire in USPSA are slightly more elaborate and allow more creativity in problem solving, but for a beginner either discipline would be equally accessible. The main consideration is which is more readily available and active in the OPs locale.


Good to know. I've only shot IDPA so can't speak to the other venues, just my personal experience. When IPSC guys show up to guest shoot at my range they typically have race guns, super hi-caps and all "the gear".
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 10:05:15 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:


Good to know. I've only shot IDPA so can't speak to the other venues, just my personal experience. When IPSC guys show up to guest shoot at my range they typically have race guns, super hi-caps and all "the gear".
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Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
Originally Posted By KILLERB6:
The thing I like about IDPA is that it revolves around using a normal EDC handgun and gear in what are typically "routine" scenarios.

There are no race guns, no fancy holsters and mag carriers...just what you would normally CCW with. So you're training with you're actual gear in relatively realistic scenarios.


With respect, your comments are VERY outdated. Nowadays you can do the same in USPSA. Anyone can bring their EDC pistol and compete on a level playing field in Production division - no "raceguns" allowed. The courses of fire in USPSA are slightly more elaborate and allow more creativity in problem solving, but for a beginner either discipline would be equally accessible. The main consideration is which is more readily available and active in the OPs locale.


Good to know. I've only shot IDPA so can't speak to the other venues, just my personal experience. When IPSC guys show up to guest shoot at my range they typically have race guns, super hi-caps and all "the gear".


a.k.a. "the fashion show"

If you see a guy with an STI/SVI racegun (either Limited or Open) with the 5 or 6 mag pouches around the belt and an SVI doublestack mag in each pouch, we could be talking about $500 to $800 in mags...MAGS! just mags by themselves.

so, fashion show
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 10:19:10 PM EST
One can't forget to show up to the dress up party (IDPA) without their vest. You never know when you might need a roll of 35mm film out of your photographer's vest.

If you like silly rules about when you can reload "I don't practice anymore" or IDPA could be for you.

Just don't forget most of the rules are arbitrary and at the discretion of the RO.

Of course, the guys at an IDPA club make this middle aged dude feel young.





Link Posted: 7/21/2014 10:22:10 PM EST
If you've never participated in any of the action shooting sports, I recommend starting with one gun before moving to 3-gun. I've seen guys jump right in to a 2-gun or 3-gun match as the first thing they try only to have it bite them in the ass. I've only been a Match Director for 6 local matches and have had to DQ 4 or 5 competitors. Only 1 of them had any experience that I know of. I hate to DQ anyone but, I try to make it a learning experience.

Find a local match and go watch. Ask questions. I can almost guarantee you will find people more than willing to help. You will find that the vast majority of people in any one of the sports are great. You will always find a few that aren't but, don't let that get to you.
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 10:36:27 PM EST
Thanks guys...it's quite a lot to take in, it seems like there is a lot of energy in the debate!!! I had been watching 3 gun nation on tv, thats what sparked my interest but I do also conceal carry. I am not a fan of making a simple thing like having fun at the range into another job though! Great points, Thanks!
Link Posted: 7/21/2014 11:05:11 PM EST
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Originally Posted By gumbi17:
Thanks guys...it's quite a lot to take in, it seems like there is a lot of energy in the debate!!! I had been watching 3 gun nation on tv, thats what sparked my interest but I do also conceal carry. I am not a fan of making a simple thing like having fun at the range into another job though! Great points, Thanks!
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Sorry OP, I wasn't much help.

Some clubs will have unaffiliated matches, into to practical shooting type things. That might be worth while. As other pointed out, three gun is jumping into the deep end. Try a pistol match, any discipline, with any gun you already have providing it is allowed. It will all happen on its own from there.
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 5:07:00 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2014 5:07:26 AM EST by KILLERB6]
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Originally Posted By fastluck13:
One can't forget to show up to the dress up party (IDPA) without their vest. You never know when you might need a roll of 35mm film out of your photographer's vest.

If you like silly rules about when you can reload "I don't practice anymore" or IDPA could be for you.

Just don't forget most of the rules are arbitrary and at the discretion of the RO.

Of course, the guys at an IDPA club make this middle aged dude feel young.

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Well...to each his own but that "vest" is to comply with the intent to be carrying concealed. 115 in the shade (AZ) and asking for full coverage is a bit much.

I'm not understanding your reload reference but the basic rules are pretty simple: mag change using cover if available, retain mags with rounds, drop empties.

We got some youngins where I shoot...several of whom are female...but yea, mostly a bunch of old guys, self included.
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 7:12:34 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/22/2014 7:23:45 AM EST by Gregory_K]
op pick a pistol or rifle only match for your first.
to me IDPA has a lot more screwy rules than USPSA.

For me USPSA is better for a new shooter. they show up with a glock 19 and 2 spare mags. I ask to place them in LTD minor and tell them why over placing them in production. When they come back the next time they usally pick ltd minor for a few more matches till they get enough gear to pick production.

reason ltd minor over production for new shooter

1. they can load the mags full cap
2. safer less magazine changes
3. less rules on where on the belt the gear can go.
Most new shooters just want to shoot and dont really care why they score at first. As long as they dont shoot themselves or the RO they had a good day.

for guys with 1911s they have SS and LTD 10, a 1911 works in both. Well SS is 1911 only (kind of like CDP was/is).

if your going to drop a empty mag in IDPA better make sure your gun is in side lock or they will gig you.

USPSA there is no cover req for you or shooting at the targets, no set rules on how you must shoot the targets. In USPSA if you can see it you can shoot it, unless the course descp says otherwise (keeps smaller clubs from purchasing a crap load of vision barriers).
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 8:36:52 AM EST
It used to be that IDPA boasted a relatively simple set of rules, but over the years their rule book has grown to about the same size as the USPSA rule book. This is actually a good thing because these kinds of dynamic shooting sports do need a lot of regulation to ensure a safe and equitable match experience for everyone involved. The practical shooting sports have an enviable safety record in no small measure because of this rules maturity.

With the above said, there is a difference in flavor. While both rules sets impose about equal restrictions on the gun-related equipment (gun, magazines, holsters etc.), IDPA rules impose additional restrictions on the shooter related to concealment and how the course of fire is shot (e.g. use of "cover", when/how to reload etc.) whereas USPSA gives the shooter a lot more freedom to solve the problem. Conversely, USPSA rules impose more constraints on match organizers to ensure competitive equity and eliminate subjectivity (e.g. cannot mandate use of cover, no subjective FTDR penalty etc. like in IDPA). In general USPSA matches tend to have higher round counts (i.e. more shooting) and put greater emphasis on gun handling skills and speed (i.e. aggressively attacking the stages), wheras IDPA rewards a slower, more cautious and accuracy-focused approach. Both sports can be a lot of fun, and will test your ability to execute skills that are relevant to self-defense under acute time pressure.

Like I said, find whichever discipline is conveniently available to you, and start shooting... that is really the only way you will be able to decide which is better for YOU.
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 11:08:34 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
<snip> While both rules sets impose about equal restrictions on the gun-related equipment (gun, magazines, holsters etc.), IDPA rules impose additional restrictions on the shooter related to concealment and how the course of fire is shot (e.g. use of "cover", when/how to reload etc.) whereas USPSA gives the shooter a lot more freedom to solve the problem. <snip>
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I guess I can see some of your points about the rules, but for me, being military and having done a bit of CQB it was all pretty intuitive...things I was/should be doing anyway, regardless of "the rules".

Again, I can only speak to IDPA but OP, don't let "the rules" intimidate you.
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 4:29:07 PM EST
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Originally Posted By gumbi17:
Thanks guys...it's quite a lot to take in, it seems like there is a lot of energy in the debate!!! I had been watching 3 gun nation on tv, thats what sparked my interest but I do also conceal carry. I am not a fan of making a simple thing like having fun at the range into another job though! Great points, Thanks!
View Quote


Keep in mind that 3-Gun Nation Pro Series can get away with things that no club level match could. It's set up to make for good TV. I'm not saying that it isn't a good time but, actual club level, area/regional and even national matches are different. I have never been to anything but a local level match but, I know quite a few that have been to the bigger matches.
Link Posted: 7/22/2014 9:51:43 PM EST
I just started shooting USPSA (I got 3 under my belt) and it is the most fun I've ever had with a pistol.
Link Posted: 7/23/2014 10:35:23 AM EST
My local club shoots IDPA so that's what I do the most of. Have shot the other games as well. I don't take any of them serious, they're just games to me. The differences are minor. Especially at my club where we are more IPDA-like than full on by the book IDPA. My biggest complaint about all of them, which true of most shooting sports, is down time. You can spend five hours on the range for five minutes shooting.
Link Posted: 7/23/2014 2:40:42 PM EST
My first competition was 3-Gun, just jumped right in. If you are comfortable with your weapons and can handle commands and drawing from holster... go slow and you will be fine. Really common sense stuff.

3-Gun is the most fun for me, but costs the most money in ammo/entry fees, takes more time and organization. But way more fun.

I probably shoot USPSA and Steel Challenge more however because it's just a pistol and a small range bag. Steel helps keeps your aim honest and USPSA helps with stage planning.

i've never shot IDPA as the scenario game and uptight folks I've met who shoot it, just wasn't my cup of tea. I shoot more for fun rather than going through countless self defense scenarios and quite honestly, I just don't take myself serious enough for the tactical timmy crowd.

You will have fun whichever you choose.
Link Posted: 7/24/2014 8:56:00 PM EST
I shot IDPA for years. USPSA is more fun. 3 gun is expensive to get in, but it's where all the money is if you shoot big matches...
Link Posted: 7/25/2014 3:48:33 PM EST
USPSA is what the OP is seeking.
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 1:51:23 PM EST
IDPA is a great place to start.
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 1:55:15 PM EST
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Originally Posted By fastluck13:
One can't forget to show up to the dress up party (IDPA) without their vest. You never know when you might need a roll of 35mm film out of your photographer's vest.

If you like silly rules about when you can reload "I don't practice anymore" or IDPA could be for you.

Just don't forget most of the rules are arbitrary and at the discretion of the RO.

Of course, the guys at an IDPA club make this middle aged dude feel young.





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I've been shooting both for a few years now and haven't heard IDPA called that...
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 2:12:53 PM EST
More of the same...

USPSA or IDPA would probably better better place to start. Either would work so try both.
You do not need any special equipment to shoot in either unless you want to get really serious in a particular class. I use the same holster, mags, and gun for Production (USPSA) and SSP (IDPA). You could also use the same gear for SS (USPSA) and CDP (IDPA).
IDPA does have more restrictive rules and generally has a lower round count per match.
If you are not very comfortable drawing from a holster, reloading, and moving while keeping the muzzle downrange and your finger off the trigger, practice before shooting your first match. Safety is paramount.

That being said I shoot a lot more IDPA than USPSA so figure out what is available and what you like then go shoot.
Link Posted: 7/28/2014 5:11:47 PM EST
Started shooting IDPA in January. I had most of the gear. I needed another mag holder and use a light jacket. It sure is lots of fun. It's a game, follow the rules.
Link Posted: 9/10/2014 3:42:44 PM EST
I mostly have shot USPSA but have shot IDPA and some 3 gun. The IDPA match left me feeling like I was 200 rounds shy of a full match, while 3 gun is a panic. I think if you have a goal to achieve with any of these disciplines i.e. having fun, then you can participate in any of them. I think you need to master the pistol first so, in my opinion, USPSA will give you the most volume of fire to practice. You can also learn from watching others who will be invariably be better than you. The skills learned there will directly translate to IDPA and 3 Gun.
Link Posted: 9/10/2014 4:30:19 PM EST
I would start out with either IDPA or USPSA before going on to 3 gun. Regardless, you're just going out your first time or two to have fun and learn the sport. Don't buy any equipment since you're likely going to want to get something different as soon as the match is over.
Link Posted: 9/10/2014 11:31:20 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/10/2014 11:32:52 PM EST by WillAndrews]
For a beginner, it's a tossup between IDPA and USPSA

IDPA stages are simpler because they are limited to 18 rounds/stage. Scoring is simple to understand. Down side is that there are more rules like using cover, slicing the pie(target sequence,) and how and when you reload. The rules are designed around off the self pistols, so it's cheap to get started. All you need is: belt, holster, mag pouch, 3 magazines, and a gun. IMO it's easier for a beginner to be competitive.

USPSA rules are easier; they revolve around safety for the most part. You can shoot targets in any order and reload when ever you feel like it. There are classes for race guns, but also for off the shelf guns (production, single stack.) Most production shooter at my club carry 5-6 magazines on the belt. Round count/ stage is higher. 30-34 round stages are the norm at my club. IMO there are more difficult shots in USPSA, and the courses of fire are more difficult.

3 Gun is most expensive, obviously. It's also the most challenging. Besides being proficient with a pistol, you'll also need to be able to reload a shotgun quickly. Expect to have stages that require rifle shots at 300+ yards from an uncomfortable shooting position after running 30 yards and engaged 20 targets with pistol or shotgun.



Link Posted: 9/12/2014 9:38:10 AM EST
I shoot both IDPA and USPSA.

There are things I like about both but honestly I think you need to try both. You mind find yourself shooting both (like me).

My main focus is USPSA but this summer my schedule has been more IDPA friendly so I've shot considerably more of those matches.

Just go into IDPA with an open mind and it's not that bad (but there are several really stupid rules aka reloads).
Link Posted: 9/12/2014 12:35:40 PM EST
I have been shooting USPSA for years, I occasionally shoot IDPA. I shoot 3-gun and Multi-gun matches when I can find them although I probably only shoot one or two a year.

IDPA is the figure skating of the pistol competition world, where USPSA is the speed skating of pistol competition.

IDPA has several points where your score is based on the very subjective evaluation of the SO. There is almost no subjective evaluation by the RO in USPSA that effects your score.

ie Whether you are using cover properly is fairly subjective in IDPA. There is no such call in USPSA. About as close to that in USPSA would be a foot fault and faulting a fault line is far less subjective than how IDPA defines the correct use of cover. Not to mention how difficult it is for the RO to sometimes see if you are using it correctly depending on stage design.

In USPSA we have scoring overlays we use to score hits on a target that are close to the line between two scoring areas. The overlay is placed, centered, over the bullet hole and if the ring on the overlay touches the next higher scoring area border the shooter is awarded that. It's concrete and repeatable. IDPA expressly forbid scoring overlays (probably because USPSA uses them). A 45 cal round nose bullet make a noticeable smaller hole in cardboard than a 38 Semi-wad cutter. Each SO interpretation of those holes is going to be subjective. The USPSA overlay removes nearly all of the subjective scoring from hits on targets.

This whole pivot foot on reloads is also very strange. Even behind cover I cannot move during a reload I can only pivot on one foot, like travelling in basketball (IDPA's words). Reload with retention is just whacked.

Another amusing thing with IDPA is earlier this week IDPA HQ decided, less than 24 hours before the National Match, that the CZ Custom Shop's CZ SP-01 Accu-Shadow which had been legal in SSP was now deemed illegal in SSP division. It was already illegal in any other divisions. WTF? So anyone showing up at the match with that handgun was screwed. IDPA did offer loaner guns to those shooters. Nothing like shooting new unfamiliar equipment at a National Match.

In principal I think IDPA should be a lot of fun. I would love to shoot my carry gear in matches designed to be somewhat more realistic than a USPSA stage but still a fun sport. That said IDPA as it presently is, is far from practical (despite the claims) and yet with all the silly rules is also far from being a fun and enjoyable sport and if you try to make a serious sport out of it you get chided for gaming it.


TL;DR: USPSA is fun, IDPA should be fun but they fucked it up.
Link Posted: 9/22/2014 3:15:43 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By mcb:
I have been shooting USPSA for years, I occasionally shoot IDPA. I shoot 3-gun and Multi-gun matches when I can find them although I probably only shoot one or two a year.

IDPA is the figure skating of the pistol competition world, where USPSA is the speed skating of pistol competition.

IDPA has several points where your score is based on the very subjective evaluation of the SO. There is almost no subjective evaluation by the RO in USPSA that effects your score.

ie Whether you are using cover properly is fairly subjective in IDPA. There is no such call in USPSA. About as close to that in USPSA would be a foot fault and faulting a fault line is far less subjective than how IDPA defines the correct use of cover. Not to mention how difficult it is for the RO to sometimes see if you are using it correctly depending on stage design.

In USPSA we have scoring overlays we use to score hits on a target that are close to the line between two scoring areas. The overlay is placed, centered, over the bullet hole and if the ring on the overlay touches the next higher scoring area border the shooter is awarded that. It's concrete and repeatable. IDPA expressly forbid scoring overlays (probably because USPSA uses them). A 45 cal round nose bullet make a noticeable smaller hole in cardboard than a 38 Semi-wad cutter. Each SO interpretation of those holes is going to be subjective. The USPSA overlay removes nearly all of the subjective scoring from hits on targets.

This whole pivot foot on reloads is also very strange. Even behind cover I cannot move during a reload I can only pivot on one foot, like travelling in basketball (IDPA's words). Reload with retention is just whacked.

Another amusing thing with IDPA is earlier this week IDPA HQ decided, less than 24 hours before the National Match, that the CZ Custom Shop's CZ SP-01 Accu-Shadow which had been legal in SSP was now deemed illegal in SSP division. It was already illegal in any other divisions. WTF? So anyone showing up at the match with that handgun was screwed. IDPA did offer loaner guns to those shooters. Nothing like shooting new unfamiliar equipment at a National Match.

In principal I think IDPA should be a lot of fun. I would love to shoot my carry gear in matches designed to be somewhat more realistic than a USPSA stage but still a fun sport. That said IDPA as it presently is, is far from practical (despite the claims) and yet with all the silly rules is also far from being a fun and enjoyable sport and if you try to make a serious sport out of it you get chided for gaming it.


TL;DR: USPSA is fun, IDPA should be fun but they fucked it up.
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Truth. I do a lot of IDPA and it's still fun, but it does have some strange rules. My philosophy is every game has rules (even IDPA which is a game that isn't supposed to be a game ), so you play by the rules. Makes it easier to accept the flat footed reload currently in the book; until it is hopefully changed.

USPSA is a little more fun, but both are a great way to start out action pistol sports. Either one is a shit-ton more fun than shooting at a static target on a range.



Link Posted: 9/29/2014 7:57:42 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By StealthyBlagga:
It used to be that IDPA boasted a relatively simple set of rules, but over the years their rule book has grown to about the same size as the USPSA rule book. This is actually a good thing because these kinds of dynamic shooting sports do need a lot of regulation to ensure a safe and equitable match experience for everyone involved. The practical shooting sports have an enviable safety record in no small measure because of this rules maturity.

With the above said, there is a difference in flavor. While both rules sets impose about equal restrictions on the gun-related equipment (gun, magazines, holsters etc.), IDPA rules impose additional restrictions on the shooter related to concealment and how the course of fire is shot (e.g. use of "cover", when/how to reload etc.) whereas USPSA gives the shooter a lot more freedom to solve the problem. Conversely, USPSA rules impose more constraints on match organizers to ensure competitive equity and eliminate subjectivity (e.g. cannot mandate use of cover, no subjective FTDR penalty etc. like in IDPA). In general USPSA matches tend to have higher round counts (i.e. more shooting) and put greater emphasis on gun handling skills and speed (i.e. aggressively attacking the stages), wheras IDPA rewards a slower, more cautious and accuracy-focused approach. Both sports can be a lot of fun, and will test your ability to execute skills that are relevant to self-defense under acute time pressure.

Like I said, find whichever discipline is conveniently available to you, and start shooting... that is really the only way you will be able to decide which is better for YOU.
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This. I did uspsa for 1 year with a 1911. I bought a CR speed belt after about three matches because I found a used one with 5 mag pouches. I used a blackhawk holster from Scheels and that was all my equipment. The first match just tell the people you pay its your first time, they'll put you with a good group. Then tell your group you're brand new, they'll help you to. At least this was my experience.

As far as tear down/setup, that's just people. Our club did awards after tear down was complete and people would all pitch in and tear their stage down after the head guy said it was okay. Score problems have been fixed by our club using Practiscore (don't worry about this)

I picked USPSA because FOR ME being told I couldn't drop a magazine seemed foolish. How do YOU know what I will do in a "real life fire fight"? In USPSA you shoot the targets you can see, do reloads whenever you want, and watch what other people do to get ideas on how to run the course.
Link Posted: 10/3/2014 12:40:59 PM EST
Ive done Steel challange, USPSA, 3-gun, PPC, GSSF, NRA highpower & bullseye but never IDPA.

For me, I enjoy 3-gun and steel challange more than USPSA. It helps that 3-gun cost $20 vs $30 for USPSA.
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