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Posted: 9/13/2021 10:50:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: GunnyFitz]
As stated, I'm reaching out to anyone with any "Real World" combat trauma experience. FYI: I "was" an active EMT-A & Combat Medic with graphic hands on experience in OIF. If you're comfortable and willing to share anything which resulted in the saving of a life/limb please feel free to do so. If not, I'd specifically love to know the products that you have used which were both complete failures, and much more so the most stellar ones you vouch for. No doubt a TQ or Quick Clot/Celox is high on the list so which brand/model has anyone successfully used?

I am not definitely NOT a Representative of North American Rescue (NAR) but have acquired more solid gear from them than I know what to do with! If you have any other impressive Company suggestions with such gear please share as it may save a future life! I do have a very small stock of Advanced Medical Gear & Intravenous Kits but this is not a Sale Thread whatsoever! Just curious of the last time anyone ran a line in a chaotic circumstance or anyone willing to share their field of study and its utilization. Semper Fi.....
fnh
Link Posted: 9/27/2021 2:50:54 AM EST
[Last Edit: northcoastwizard] [#1]
One stinker that comes to mind is when we got our first CRoC. Basically a vice for controlling junctional hemorrhage.  I happened to come back to the flagpole when the clinic got one so I got to sit in and see the product demo. Wasn't there but our PROFIS doc used one on a double amputee after a rocket drop, he tried using it on a litter and said it kept bowing and wouldn't tighten properly, so he threw it across the room and got a TQ on in a minute. After that they sent all the CRoCs back to KAF.

My favorite commercial pressure bandage has always been the standard 8x10 H bandage. Not ideal for compact IFAKs but for a full-size bag I make room for them. The pressure bar works so much better than an Israeli. I had an Israeli pressure bar fall off on a casualty, axillary junctional bleed. I think the glue failed due to heat, it still worked as an elastic bandage but it was frustrating.
The OLAES is a good one too, though I haven't gotten to use the pressure bar as an eye cup.

As far as newer stuff I've yet to use a ratcheting TQ or iTClamp but they seem promising. Particularly the iTClamp, I'd love to demo that one before I retire.

Got to work with Brits on a trip and got to see them use saran wrap as a prehospital burn dressing, worked surprisingly well and since then I keep a compact roll in my IED-country aid bag.
Link Posted: 11/9/2021 9:08:19 PM EST
[#2]
Figured I'd "splash the pot anytime I choose" since this is my Thread after all. Know damn well there are some Corpsman here....
Link Posted: 11/20/2021 1:07:13 AM EST
[#3]
Cats work
Combat gauze works decently
Packing gauze is good . Curlex a good 2nd
Duct tape, get the good stuff
Leather man raptor or xshears
Link Posted: 11/20/2021 7:54:56 AM EST
[#4]
Found this Thread to contain some interesting material. Now I'll have to dive into all my gear to see how many of each I have!
Link Posted: 11/20/2021 8:11:22 AM EST
[Last Edit: GunnyFitz] [#5]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By northcoastwizard:
One stinker that comes to mind is when we got our first CRoC. Basically a vice for controlling junctional hemorrhage.  I happened to come back to the flagpole when the clinic got one so I got to sit in and see the product demo. Wasn't there but our PROFIS doc used one on a double amputee after a rocket drop, he tried using it on a litter and said it kept bowing and wouldn't tighten properly, so he threw it across the room and got a TQ on in a minute. After that they sent all the CRoCs back to KAF.
My favorite commercial pressure bandage has always been the standard 8x10 H bandage. Not ideal for compact IFAKs but for a full-size bag I make room for them. The pressure bar works so much better than an Israeli. The pressure bar fell off on a casualty, axillary junctional bleed. I think the glue failed due to heat, it still worked as an elastic bandage but it was frustrating.
The OLAES is a good one too, though I haven't gotten to use the pressure bar as an eye cup. As far as newer stuff I've yet to use a ratcheting TQ or iTClamp but they seem promising. Particularly the iTClamp, I'd love to demo that one before I retire.

Got to work with Brits on a trip and got to see them use saran wrap as a prehospital burn dressing, worked surprisingly well and since then I keep a compact roll in my IED-country aid bag.
View Quote

Forgive the late response. I found your post extremely informative and looked up the items you speak of within. Particularly these:

IClamp

Now THIS device appears to require some serious medical training doesn't it? (No litter use though) Even prepped for use I see it being difficult while under any type of duress. Funny how the Doc threw it across the room! Did the "double amputee" survive though?  
Thanks again....
Link Posted: 11/30/2021 3:24:48 PM EST
[Last Edit: northcoastwizard] [#6]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By GunnyFitz:

Forgive the late response. I found your post extremely informative and looked up the items you speak of within. Particularly these:

IClamp

Now THIS device appears to require some serious medical training doesn't it? (No litter use though) Even prepped for use I see it being difficult while under any type of duress. Funny how the Doc threw it across the room! Did the "double amputee" survive though?  
Thanks again....
View Quote



Yeah the iTClamp is auth'd under TCCC for prehospital use now, it demo'd well when I saw it and looked easy enough to apply. Assuming the plastic is durable enough to live in an aid bag I can see 1-2 of them being a staple in any doorkicking medic's toolbag.
I wish I had a few as a young guy in AFG.

On the CRoC not really. With a working knowledge of anatomy you can do a lot of stabilize trauma and buy some time, if not save lives. Not sure about the pt, he made it to Walter Reed though, wasn't one of ours.

On the Army prehospital side the SAM JTQ and others like it are now our go-to devices for those injuries for a few reasons. In my book their simplicity means less failure points - with the SAM JTQ it's functionally a pelvic binder with a BP cuff that velcros proximal to a bleed.
If the SAM never existed it wouldn't surprise me to find an article saying one of the cartel guys that came in during the surge cobbled one together with a belt and a BP cuff, combining his knowledge of anatomy and experience popping doors with an air wedge.
You see it all the time, and eventually you end up in that position yourself every now and then.
The ingenuity of young guys under duress always surprises me. Unfortunately the surprise is sometimes a 20% APR Camaro with a trunk full of xboxes.

Not as sexy but another adjunct that's been a game-changer is the iGel. It's not new but so much easier to use than the Combi-tubes and KING-LT airways I learned to use when I came in.
It's another example of streamlining application. iGel application simplifies measuring(usually), cutting, insertion finesse, inflating, etc etc to
1. Open sterile package
2. Insert iGel appropriately

Teaching KING LT refreshers can take 1-2 hours depending on experience, iGels take an hour for a med section. Most of that time being hands-on drilling the skill over and over.
Link Posted: 5/7/2022 7:14:05 PM EST
[#7]
Have you guys ever seen (or used) anything like this before?

XSTAT
Link Posted: 5/7/2022 10:29:47 PM EST
[#8]
Link Posted: 5/9/2022 3:54:10 AM EST
[#9]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By medicmandan:
I've seen the videos for a few years.  I'm not aware of anyone in Utah carrying/using them.
View Quote

You have to admit though, it's a pretty innovative idea that one would think others would attempt to emulate out there. Despite the little X they put on these sponges I can see accidental pieces left inside a GSW cavity somehow. I'm going to contact them none the less.......
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