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Posted: 12/9/2016 12:34:42 AM EST
Just finished these up. There are a lot of the flatwork steps skipped, but should be easy enough to figure out.

Notice there are 3 layers, so you have Cordura on the outside, padding, then pack cloth inner layer that all the elastic and internal stowage is sewn to.

It's basically a mini blow-out pouch for immediate bleeders and perforating injuries.



























Link Posted: 12/9/2016 12:41:05 AM EST
Here's another one. If anyone with TCCC, SOCM/SFMS, or Combat Medic backgrounds has input, I would like to hear it.

I've looked at some of the IFAKs on the market, and wanted something that would accommodate chest seals, lots of Ace wraps and gauze, plus IV starters and some instruments for a good bleeder kit.

There's a lot of room in this to pack most of what you could think of needing for a comprehensive bleeder kit, but it still packs tight and close to your kit without protruding from your side.

The flats are padded, with pack cloth liner and 500D Cordura on the outside, very lightweight still, but stiffer and more substantial than your common 1000D pouches even, with definite shape.

236 grams empty





Link Posted: 12/9/2016 2:40:02 AM EST
Skilz, you has them.
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 9:52:49 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 11:01:38 AM EST
I'm using 2 different machines on this.

One is an all metal Kenmore for a lot of the flatwork and smaller operations like pile tape, bar-tacking the elastic, doing the zippers, and attaching the flats to each other.

The other is my heavy duty Juki 1541S, which is used for the MOLLE webbing and binding tape.

Flatwork:

Trace patterns on materials
Cut materials
Sew pile tape for chit marker on outer Cordura panel, in this case, Multicam
Sew pile tape on inner panels and pocket
Sew elastic on inner panels, including the pocket
If using the snap method with internal divider like on the 2nd pouch, install female snaps on inside of the chest seal/flat gauze pocket
Sew MOLLE webbing to close-side outer layer taking seam allowance into consideration and final assembly stitch clearance for the top of the pouch

Zipper work:
Cut coil zipper by the yard with hot knife
With wire cutters, snip pulls off and replace with 550 cord pulls or other quiet pull options
Sew inner pack cloth layer strips on inside of zippers, then top stitch
Sew outer Cordura layers strips on outside of zippers, then top stitch
Attach center panels, inner and outer to zipper, insert padding between

Assembly:
Hot glue, fabric glue, or double-sided tape foam panels to inside of 2 of the flats
Sew close-side MOLLE panel outer to inner panel with chest seal pocket, with foam in between
Sew outer Cordura panel to outer inside panel with foam in between
If doing the inner divider pouch, sew the divider 3 sides inside-out, then pull right-side out, insert foam, and top-stitch with final edge folded in and seal
Rivet in the snaps in the center panel of the zipper for the center divider (removable)
Sew binding tape, 550 cord, or shock cord tabs to the sides of the center divider as hangar control
Rivet snaps or use attachment method of choice for the hangar lines (this one uses plastic snaps, with the females already attached back in the flat work to the chest seal pocket)

Mock-up the finished panels and zipper panel with clamps, inside-out, centering on the zipper at the bottom
Stitch the outside together
Run binding tape over it
You're done

They are actually kinda fun to make, right up until the binding, unless you have a right angle tape binder. I'm looking at getting one of those set up.
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 11:13:55 AM EST
I didn't like how fat the 1" tape was for the hangars, so I folded it over and zig-zagged it.

I would use 550, thinner tape, or something else that is slimmer in the future. I've seen some pouches that use shock cord and barrelocks, but I don't want that many loose ends flapping around inside.

I just want to be able to unzip, reach in, and grab what I need.

Link Posted: 12/9/2016 11:30:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 11:46:39 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By medicmandan:
That's awesome. I doubt my Viking machine could handle that.

So, when will you start offering classes for us locals?
View Quote

We should organize something locally for medical training some time. I need a TCCC refresher bigtime.

It's one of the most neglected and overlooked skill sets, and could be an excellent opportunity to introduce the younger generations to independent thinking, self-reliance, and then pull them over to the dark side of the force.
Link Posted: 12/9/2016 12:23:59 PM EST
Link Posted: 2/21/2017 12:06:11 PM EST
Looks good. Step by step would be nice but I can only imagine how much of a headache that would be to document. How long does it take you to make a pouch like these?


Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By LRRPF52:

We should organize something locally for medical training some time. I need a TCCC refresher bigtime.

It's one of the most neglected and overlooked skill sets, and could be an excellent opportunity to introduce the younger generations to independent thinking, self-reliance, and then pull them over to the dark side of the force.
View Quote


In.
Link Posted: 2/21/2017 1:07:27 PM EST
It takes maybe a day if you only did one.

There is a bit of cutting.

Flat work starts with MOLLE on the back panel, elastic on the internals.

Then place the padding on the insides, sew the outsides to the insides.

Do the zipper flats, which involve 2 inner strips of pack cloth, 2 outer strips (Cordura camo pattern of choice to match the outer panel), then the zipper center pieces for the bottom, which also has padding in it.

Mock up the assembled zipper to one of the panels inside-out, using clips.

Sew those together.

Then do the final panel to the other side of the zipper, inside-out.

Then run those seams through the binder.

Sew the center panel in and attach the 550 hangar.

That's a simplistic overview of course. I use double-sided tape to hold flatwork in place on these. Some use hot glue guns. Others use fabric glue.

There is prep work for the zippers, removing the metal pulls, tying in the 550 pulls, setting up the slides onto the coil, melting the coil ends with your hot knife, etc.

Some companies like to use a size larger pull and put them on with the coils on the inside of the pouch, so you get a smoother fit and finish, with more water repellant properties.
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