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Posted: 4/4/2006 4:53:44 AM EDT
Wow, who knew!

Poll: Corzine approval rating sinks
Posted by the Asbury Park Press on 04/4/06
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TRENTON — Gov. Corzine's approval rating sank in March as he proposed a state budget laden with tax increases and aid cuts, according to a poll out today.

The Fairleigh Dickinson/PublicMind poll found nearly a tripling in the number of voters who rate Corzine's job performance "poor'' and nearly a doubling in the number who have a "very unfavorable'' view of the governor, who took office in January.

The percentage of voters who disapprove of the job Corzine is doing more than doubled since the previous poll on March 8.

In the poll taken March 27 through April 2 of 685 registered voters, 36 percent disapproved of Corzine's job performance, compared to 16 percent who disapproved in the March 8 survey. The poll has a sampling error margin of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

"One month ago, people were on the fence. A month later, people are off the fence and forming hard opinions,'' said Peter Woolley, director of the poll. "A month ago, people were waiting to see what the governor would do. Now they've seen some of it and their initial reaction is negative.''

The record $30.9 billion budget Corzine proposed on March 21 includes provisions for increasing and expanding the sales tax, raising taxes on cigarettes and liquor, reducing funding to higher education, and funding schools and towns at last year's levels, likely prompting local tax increases.

The people who rate Corzine's job performance as "poor'' jumped from 8 percent to 22 percent. Meanwhile, his approval-disapproval rating, which was 47 percent to 16 percent in the March 8 poll, stood at 39-36 in the new tally.


Link Posted: 4/4/2006 6:34:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 6:35:06 AM EDT by DWFAN]
For as corrupt and screwed up as this state is........

CORSLIME will F' it up even further....I guarantee it
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 6:41:55 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DWFAN:
For as corrupt and screwed up as this state is........

CORSLIME will F' it up even further....I guarantee it



Yup. Now we just have to see how badly.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 6:43:41 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/4/2006 6:44:09 AM EDT by Camdeck]
Unfortunately, he may decide to boost his ratings among liberals by pushing more "feel good" anti-gun legislation.

From a political standpoint the tax & budget issue is a loser for him (or any other candidate in his position).

So he may be tempted to "make a stand" on a "winning" issue with respect to his voter base.

His handlers may have him change the focus from "Corzine is raising my (already high) taxes" to "Corzine is fighting to make our streets safer by taking away those nasty guns".

Political re-direction of the sheeple has gotten this country into a lot of bad legislation over the years.

Link Posted: 4/4/2006 8:03:09 AM EDT
Shh - don't say that. The local DU trolls will pick up the phone.
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 10:52:50 AM EDT
Regardless, it goes to show that liberals really have nothing to offer society except one f*ck up after another, and some feel good law making mixed in. Here's hoping NJ gives him the boot...
Link Posted: 4/4/2006 3:13:16 PM EDT
Even the colleges like Rutgers (students, faculty and prof's) are starting to hate him due to the cuts he's making (it would make tuition rise 30% by some estimates). They'be been calling him a bastard i nthe school papers for the past two weeks now and heckled him at a speech. All I can say is it's good news if somewhere as "liberal" as a college is starting to hate him.
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 5:32:30 AM EDT
More of the end game....

I told my wife, be ready -
Link Posted: 4/5/2006 7:00:17 PM EDT
IMPEACH HIM!!!
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 10:58:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By EndofGoogle:
Even the colleges like Rutgers (students, faculty and prof's) are starting to hate him due to the cuts he's making (it would make tuition rise 30% by some estimates). They'be been calling him a bastard i nthe school papers for the past two weeks now and heckled him at a speech. All I can say is it's good news if somewhere as "liberal" as a college is starting to hate him.



Now they get to learn what we knew was going to happen!
Link Posted: 4/6/2006 12:47:09 PM EDT
cmon
he is cutting healthcare money
CMC by me is geting cut 4.3xx million
and then they give Kimball like 60k
thats it
thats like 1 weeks stay in the ICU i think
or a years supply of paper for the file room
man this guy sucks
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 12:01:45 PM EDT
Hopefully we are due for a Republican governer in the next election, if we can survive that long.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:40:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By safetyhit:
Hopefully we are due for a Republican governer in the next election, if we can survive that long.



NJ republicans are just a placeholder for the next democrat.
When was the last time we had a favorable change in NJ gun laws from the governors office?
I can’t remember any.

Rich V

Link Posted: 4/7/2006 1:42:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 555R:
cmon
he is cutting healthcare money
CMC by me is geting cut 4.3xx million

and then they give Kimball like 60k
thats it
thats like 1 weeks stay in the ICU i think
or a years supply of paper for the file room
man this guy sucks



That is ok as long as the illegals get free health care all is ok.
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:17:57 PM EDT
one item i have not seen much about, a tax on YOUR hospital bed. it is part of his bill to bring in 430 mill a year. the bed tax is 620.00

the source of my info is Town Topics, Princeton, NJ. Wednesday, April 5th.

to quote from the atricle, ' is that by and large, only hospitals with large number of uninsured patients would see any kind of payday, leaving hospitals covering largely insured demographics, like University Medical Center at Princeton (UMCP) in the dark, and, according to some officals, in danger.'

better stay well, or else!!!!

maxwell
Link Posted: 4/7/2006 2:28:13 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/7/2006 2:29:20 PM EDT by M1-Matt]

Corzine's Bed Tax Could Spell Problems for Medical Center

Matthew Hersh

A relatively small line item in Gov. Jon Corzine's budget address two weeks ago outlining an effort to capture increased matches in health care from the federal government has prompted health care officials throughout the state, including those from the Princeton HealthCare System, to envision a bleak picture of overly-taxed facilities with little chance of survival, which could prove disastrous to the state's suburban hospitals.

In his March 21 address, Mr. Corzine proposed a $620-per hospital bed tax that would bring the state approximately $430 million per year, with about $215 million used for state expenses with the remainder used to qualify for a Federal match from Medicaid to be funneled back to the state's hospitals.

In short, the governor hopes to raise a certain amount of money, double it with the federal match, keep the general match to help balance the budget and then return what has been collected back to the hospitals, but it has to be returned on the basis of Medicaid cases.

What has caused an uproar from suburban hospitals throughout the state and the New Jersey Hospital Association (NJHA), is that, by and large, only hospitals with a large number of uninsured patients would see any kind of payday, leaving hospitals covering largely insured demographics, like the University Medical Center at Princeton (UMCP), in the dark, and, according to some officials, in danger.

Gary Carter, the president of the NJHA, told the Associated Press after Mr. Corzine's address, that "worst part is the fact that we are going to be taxed to provide something we are mandated to do.

"It's a really bad idea."

In Princeton, with the hospital's parent company, Princeton HealthCare System, seeking to build a $350 million facility in Plainsboro, the prospect is troublesome, and the stakes are high, potentially preventing a move, or worse.

"It could severely jeopardize the future of our hospital," said Pam Hersh, vice president for Government and Community Affairs for PHCS. The state budget proposal would cost the hospital $4.5 million a year, eliminating its entire profit margin, the equivalent of laying off 80 people, and would hamper PHCS's chances of relocation.

"That would leave a big void in the health care of this region," she said, adding that the decimation of the hospital's profit margin would damage the institution's credit rating to the point where it would not be able to borrow money. At the end of the day, Ms. Hersh said, the proposal "takes away an economic tool in central New Jersey."

Hospitals generally operate on less than 1 percent profit, with UMCP working slightly above that number, and PHCS, under the president and CEO Barry Rabner, has worked toward getting above sea level again. "He did what he had to do to get us into the black, and that would be completely wiped out," Ms. Hersh said, also worrying that the governor's proposal would create a dichotomy when it comes to reimbursement per Medicaid patient served, with hospitals treating poorer patients receiving charity care funding where others, like UMCP, would not.

As charity care is only being funded at the 2002 level, the hospital is dealing with a double-edged sword: getting taxed more and not getting the reimbursement for charity care. Right now, PHCS receives about 45 cents per dollar in charity care. Under the budget proposal, that amount could sink to as low as 15 cents.

Ms. Hersh appeared alongside Carol Norris, PHCS vice president for Marketing and Public Affairs, Monday night at a forum sponsored by the Princeton Area League of Women Voters. Both officials, however, remained confident that the hospital's development plan would move forward, with Ms. Norris outlining the hospital's work with outside consultants in creating a strategy of moving to Plainsboro, with the goal of becoming one of the top 10 percent of hospitals in the country.

Concerning the FMC site, Ms. Norris said the completion of purchase is "close, but we're not quite there," adding that ground could still be broken as early as the fall of 2007.

The emerging debate as to whether the hospital should keep some sort of care facility on site has raised calls for a joint municipal task force to look at the issue.



Welcome to New Jersey come here and DIE.
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