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Posted: 7/15/2003 4:46:06 PM EDT
I am thinking of buying a shtf cabin in Chenango County. I know someone there who knows the locals has a cabin in the sticks, no electricity but has propane, lots of acreage, game and no one cares about gunshots. Anyone here know the area or have comments. Should I go further north or north west??
Link Posted: 7/15/2003 5:00:05 PM EDT
Go to PA so you can legally own Class 3 at the cabin.
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 6:30:27 AM EDT
I have a friend with a "SHTF" cabin in Chenango County. More of a deer camp, actually. I helped him build parts of it and maintain it. I go there frequently to hunt, swim and relax. He also has a deep, cold pond, well-stocked with trout. He has ~30 acres surrounded by private and state land. Hard to believe this area is only ~1 hr SE of Syracuse. Beautiful area, lots of deer and turkeys. Land ~inexpensive. No class 3, but it ain't bad for NY. If you ahven't seen it, take a drive out. Stop by the Georgetown Inn (Rt 80) for a damned fine meal.

I like southern tier for, IMO, better hunting opportunities and the gently rolling hillsides. However, if you go up N, say St Lawrence Co., you can get some real buys on land. Kinda flat, however.
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 1:49:52 PM EDT
how much is land per acre up there?
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 2:39:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
how much is land per acre up there?



Team NY-AR15.com Group buy?
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 2:40:37 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/16/2003 2:41:15 PM EDT by Phil_A_Steen]

Originally Posted By Vinnie:

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
how much is land per acre up there?



Team NY-AR15.com Group buy?



Why the winky face? I'd go in on a 1,000 acre hunting and shooting preserve in PA.

[Edited to add] Although I have no AR-15s to shoot there!
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 2:56:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/16/2003 3:04:57 PM EDT by Hoplite]

Originally Posted By Phil_A_Steen:

Originally Posted By Vinnie:

Originally Posted By Hoplite:
how much is land per acre up there?



Team NY-AR15.com Group buy?



Why the winky face? I'd go in on a 1,000 acre hunting and shooting preserve in PA.

[Edited to add] Although I have no AR-15s to shoot there!


hmm
thats a lot of land.
I would like some land but i dont think thats happening for 5-10 years at the least. I just want to own a registered m16 a few cans and SBR my prebans
Phil you can shoot one my ARs
Link Posted: 7/16/2003 3:03:28 PM EDT
1 to 2 thousand an acre depending on size, utilities, other factors. The big plus is that I would know my neighbors have someone to look out for me/them. They know the locals, carpenters/builders people to do some maintenace, ie road plowing grass cutting etc. The situation is prety much no utilities need a generater to fill water tank, use solar for minimal lighting and get gas/lp tanks filled by utility. Area abuts state land and is reasonably close enough to Suffolk Co. for hunting vac, weekend/three day excursions and for shtf purposes. I just don't know if the area us rural enough or if there is any reason not to buy there or a better locale, and if so why. Thanks for the input.
Link Posted: 7/17/2003 7:12:16 AM EDT
Oh, you can do much better than that on land if you are patient, or in the right place at the right time. I've seen 100 acre parcels in the $30,000 range a few times. Another friend of mine bought 61 wooded acres for $18,000 3 years ago.

My friend who owns the Chenango Co. camp bought the land at an auction. He then logged it, which paid for the land. He has a number of parcels which he buys and then logs to defray the cost. I should mention he operates a logging company.

If you buy land, pay particular attention to the timber. Type, quality, and quantity. has it been logged in the past 10-20 years?

Link Posted: 7/17/2003 3:05:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By SP10:
If you buy land, pay particular attention to the timber. Type, quality, and quantity. has it been logged in the past 10-20 years?




Any particular reason this is significant?
Link Posted: 7/18/2003 7:41:09 AM EDT
Significant only if you wish to recoup any of your initial investment in buying the land from the existing timber on the property.
Some folks have ZERO interest in logging, because, honestly, even if carefully and properly done, your land may still look like shit for a year or 2.

Logging is usually done on a ~20 year cycle on managed timber. If you do buy timbered land and decide to have it logged, be very careful and vigilant. There are some wood butchers out there.

As a plus, logging is very beneficial fo rwildlife/hunting. Much less forage/cover/diversity in old growth/mature forests.

Link Posted: 7/18/2003 5:00:55 PM EDT
I had a friend buy some land in Eden, New York from an old lady. He didn't realize it at the time, but one day, a logging company rep knocked on his door and asked him if they could take the timber from his land. I forget how much he had, I think it was ~15 acres. He made a killing on the timber.

In general, hardwoods are quite valuable. Softwoods aren't, but I don't know any more than that.

-Nick Viejo.
Link Posted: 7/18/2003 6:49:29 PM EDT
Have to throw this in here. Once you have your land logged it will look like SHIT for a long time. No matter what company does it your still going to tear up the forest floor, have huge ruts from the skidders, not to mention all the stuff they leave behind (tree tops, branchs, trees they cut down to make logging paths that they just leave there). Also it will get VERY scrubby. Box elder will take over. Overall its like 20 years before it even starts to look better.

If I had a way to get pics onto the computer I would show ya. My parents bought a house last year with 10 wooded acres. Unfortunately its almost impasssible because the last owners had it logged about 8 years ago. Its incredible the destruction back there. There is one path I cut straight to the back through all the scrub, ruts etc. and it was a major undertaking. Had to build a corduroy road and everything.
Link Posted: 7/19/2003 3:36:57 PM EDT
I am about to purchase a house in Chenango County, only 2.5 acres but lots of places around to shoot. Rather rural area lots of room for hunting and shooting. Pistol permit won't allow for CCW unless you know someone but its not nearly as hard as neighboring counties.

Chenango is actually real popular with downstate people and the NJ crowd much to the dismay of the locals. In fact the house I'm buying could be considered a rescue attempt to buy back some of the property from downstaters.

NYC / NJ native Jim Cirillo has his summer home here where he shoots and hunts on many many acres he bought years ago. People around him know thats the place to go if SHTF because he has a rediculous stash of guns and ammunition from his long career.

I will warn you of this, since I moved into this area I have noticed an awful high percentage of 'special ed' kind of folk. While I kind of joke about this with the natives I really do wonder if there is something in the water here. Be warned, you don't even want to see what shops at the Wal-mart out here.

Finally on to the logging issue. Logging is big business around here and many people can completely recoup the money they spend on property by selectively logging it out. My GF's parents recently sold 11 trees on a small 17 acre lot for $4500

Besides some skidder tracks the land looks fine. The loggers just happened to notice a few trees and aproached him about them. And again this was for a handful of hardwoods, they were interested in others as well but her parents didn't want to sell too many.
Link Posted: 7/20/2003 12:57:50 PM EDT
Just learned that Chenango County is shotgun only does this mean no rimfire hunting for small game??
Link Posted: 7/21/2003 7:08:13 AM EDT
You can hunt small game with .22s or woodchucks/varmints with centerfire rifles. Shotgun only refers to deer hunting.

ZRH, your parents property was logged by wood butchers. Mine was not. Other than a few tops I didn't cut up for firewood, and a few stumps, you would be hard pressed to know my land was logged 2 years after the fact. It was "selectively" logged, not clear cut. Roughly 30-35 trees were cut on a thickly wooded hillside. I already had logging trails in place. This is why it is so damned important to make sure it is done right by reputable loggers.

Hey Phil, any word on the DW retail shop? is it open on Saturday?
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 4:48:11 PM EDT
GUYS I HAVE 5 1/2 ACRES IN HERKIMER CTY AND I'M INTERESTED IN HAVING A CAMP BUILT ON IT CAN YOU LOCALS PROVIDE ANY LEADS? ITS IN THE SOUTH EAST PART OF THE CTY ABOUT 12 MILES NORTH OF COOPERSTOWN
Link Posted: 7/22/2003 5:12:52 PM EDT
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