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Posted: 1/5/2006 2:58:04 AM EDT
I have finally decided to start reloading this year as paying out £68 for 200 American eagle 62g seems quite expensive to me. How does that figure compare to reloading 200 of your own and what is a good cheap space effective set up consist of as i have absolutely no knowledge of reloading or equipment?
Cheers.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 3:22:25 AM EDT
As a quick calculation, making similar ammunition:

62gr bullets, once-fired cases, magtech primers, vectan powder would be just over £38 for the 200 rounds. (The Cases could then be re-used, so the next 200 would be a bit cheaper...) I got the prices for the components from Peter Lawmans website.... Obviously if you start loading 77gr Sierra MatchKing bullets, the cost is going to go up considerably, but they don't compare to the American Eagle. (A bit like comparing throwing a stone to a missile! )

If you want something compact, you probably want to look at a turret or progressive type press from someone like Lee (if you really want to start cheap) or Dillon (if you want something that you won't want to replace in a year.) as everything hangs off the same press.

Nick
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 3:39:32 AM EDT
I'm reloading .30 M1 carbine and .357 mag on an RCBS Rockchucker single stage press usingLEE & RCBS carbide dies.
I've got a complete setup for .308 (dies/powder/cases/heads/primers) but haven't made time to actually reload that cal yet.

I've got the cheap LEE powder dippers and powder dispensers/tricklers through to a Lyman DPS1200 all singing & dancing electronic powder dispenser/measure/scale for 1/10th grain accurate loads.

I prime cases off-press using a LEE autoprime, usually whilst watching telly..

I mount the press in a black and decker workmate, which I setup in the kitchen. I'd love to have a dedicated reloading room though where I can leave everything setup....

One day I'll get a progrssive setup.....handling all those cases one a time for each operation (resize/decap/expand/seat) gets a bit boring after a while....

As for the economics of handloading, I guess it depends which cals you plan to reload and ultimately how many rounds you get through in a month.

I like the flexibility of handloading as I don't always need full-house loads and can tailor loads for specific uses, etc.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 3:45:30 AM EDT
Is there a website for all that terminology, I'm baffled! So how many pieces of equipment are needed? Phew
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 3:54:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/5/2006 3:56:50 AM EDT by target-hunter]
have a look at www.leeprecision.com or www.bluepress.com. Download an instruction manual or two for the different presses, and they'll give you a good idea what your looking for. Also, Lee sells a intro to reloading book which I think is pretty cheap for a bit of bedtime reading...

Nick

ETA Lee make an all-in-one kit with everything you need to get started at a reasonable price.
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 4:00:52 AM EDT
Hi Matt

Welcome to reloading, if I can do it then anyone can.....

I'm a reloading newbie really, I'm sure there are much better qualified people on here, but in the meantime check out the following to give you an idea of whats involved:

www.reloadingcentral.com/howto.html

www.rcbs.com/default.asp?menu=1&s1=5&s2=15

www.geocities.com/gunversation/reloading101/reloading101.htm

Link Posted: 1/5/2006 4:47:15 AM EDT
Great, Thanks for that chaps, Will look into it, I'm sure i'll save a bloody fortune in the long run!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:10:08 AM EDT
You probably won't - You'll just shoot more!!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 5:39:00 AM EDT

Originally Posted By mattyUK:
Great, Thanks for that chaps, Will look into it, I'm sure i'll save a bloody fortune in the long run!



Once you have everything you need, and have started getting into it you will save load's of do$h. The only reason why I haven't got into the reloading game is that the German authoritie's force you to take a course and pass the test's before you can buy powder.

It's a great past time when the rain just dosen't seem to know when to stop, or in my case the snow.

Tony
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 1:20:23 PM EDT
Yes but at least the German authorities let you play with better toys my friend!
Link Posted: 1/5/2006 8:25:54 PM EDT

Originally Posted By target-hunter:
You probably won't - You'll just shoot more!!



Truer words were never spoken!

I started reloading when I was 12 years old. All my reloading gear fit in an orange crate and I'd c-clamp the press to a work bench when I wanted to reload. I use the same setup when I teach reloading to my hunter education classes. The press dates back to the 1930's.

You won't save any money. You will shoot much more for the same amount however.

SRM

Link Posted: 1/6/2006 2:36:41 AM EDT
The way things are going at the moment (.gov.uk might licence presses or other reloading stuff ) it might be best to buy the press you think you'll end up with now rather than get a smaller one to start with and buy bigger/better later.

Get a turret/progressive press. This way you'll not end up with a load of half finished rounds if you get called away quick, and the repeat set-up/loading process is a lot easier.

Therefore, I would recommend you get the Dillon 550B at least, or even the 650. Lee do make a good turret press that's cheap and will load most of what you'll want up to about 308 size (longer cases can be a bit fiddly). The Lee will be slower than the Dillon for rifle bullets but will be great for pistol loads and costs a fraction of the price. The Lee is also a great press for beginners.

If you want to load for gallery/pistol calibre as well as rifle bullets, you could always get both a Lee and a Dillon, or two dillons.

You'll need a minimum of:
One press
one set dies for each calibre
one powder measure (may come with press)
one set scales to check the powder charge (weight)
somewhere to do the loading (away from distraction!!!) with a sturdy bench - better if you can keep it set up
Case lube (essential for rifle reloading but not as much if you're loading pistol ammo using carbine dies)
bullets (often called heads)
cases
primers
powder

W­hat you will want very soon afterwards is a case tumbler and tumbling media (corncob or similar). This will clean the cases before you reload. It'll help keep the cases in good condition and reduce the wear on the dies.
Also a case trimmer and possible a case check guage. Necked cases will stretch with each firing, some makes more than others. You will eventually need to trim them back or the loaded round will not fit in the chamber and may give high than normal pressure on firing. With straight walled cases this is not so much of a problem. You might be able to get away with not trimming for the first reload but you'll soon get to a stage where the case will be too long. The first trim is usually a big one, after that it is just a case of taking off small amounts.


Hope this helps.

Matt (no the other one).
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 4:12:32 AM EDT
Cheers, Will check that kit out!
Matt(y) the other one.
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 1:15:25 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Scope-eye:
The way things are going at the moment (.gov.uk might licence presses or other reloading stuff ) it might be best to buy the press you think you'll end up with now rather than get a smaller one to start with and buy bigger/better later.

Get a turret/progressive press. This way you'll not end up with a load of half finished rounds if you get called away quick, and the repeat set-up/loading process is a lot easier.

Therefore, I would recommend you get the Dillon 550B at least, or even the 650. Lee do make a good turret press that's cheap and will load most of what you'll want up to about 308 size (longer cases can be a bit fiddly). The Lee will be slower than the Dillon for rifle bullets but will be great for pistol loads and costs a fraction of the price. The Lee is also a great press for beginners.

If you want to load for gallery/pistol calibre as well as rifle bullets, you could always get both a Lee and a Dillon, or two dillons.

You'll need a minimum of:
One press
one set dies for each calibre
one powder measure (may come with press)
one set scales to check the powder charge (weight)
somewhere to do the loading (away from distraction!!!) with a sturdy bench - better if you can keep it set up
Case lube (essential for rifle reloading but not as much if you're loading pistol ammo using carbine dies)
bullets (often called heads)
cases
primers
powder

W­hat you will want very soon afterwards is a case tumbler and tumbling media (corncob or similar). This will clean the cases before you reload. It'll help keep the cases in good condition and reduce the wear on the dies.
Also a case trimmer and possible a case check guage. Necked cases will stretch with each firing, some makes more than others. You will eventually need to trim them back or the loaded round will not fit in the chamber and may give high than normal pressure on firing. With straight walled cases this is not so much of a problem. You might be able to get away with not trimming for the first reload but you'll soon get to a stage where the case will be too long. The first trim is usually a big one, after that it is just a case of taking off small amounts.


Hope this helps.

Where is the best place to get this kit from, Can't seem to find any stockists in gun mart?
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 2:34:15 PM EDT
In Gun Mart theres normally the Sportsmans Gun Centre & Roding Armoury that have quite a bit of reloading kit...
Link Posted: 1/6/2006 5:04:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By mattyUK:
Originally Posted By Scope-eye:
The way things are going at the moment (.gov.uk might licence presses or other reloading stuff ) it might be best to buy the press you think you'll end up with now rather than get a smaller one to start with and buy bigger/better later.

Get a turret/progressive press. This way you'll not end up with a load of half finished rounds if you get called away quick, and the repeat set-up/loading process is a lot easier.

Therefore, I would recommend you get the Dillon 550B at least, or even the 650. Lee do make a good turret press that's cheap and will load most of what you'll want up to about 308 size (longer cases can be a bit fiddly). The Lee will be slower than the Dillon for rifle bullets but will be great for pistol loads and costs a fraction of the price. The Lee is also a great press for beginners.

If you want to load for gallery/pistol calibre as well as rifle bullets, you could always get both a Lee and a Dillon, or two dillons.

You'll need a minimum of:
One press
one set dies for each calibre
one powder measure (may come with press)
one set scales to check the powder charge (weight)
somewhere to do the loading (away from distraction!!!) with a sturdy bench - better if you can keep it set up
Case lube (essential for rifle reloading but not as much if you're loading pistol ammo using carbine dies)
bullets (often called heads)
cases
primers
powder

W­hat you will want very soon afterwards is a case tumbler and tumbling media (corncob or similar). This will clean the cases before you reload. It'll help keep the cases in good condition and reduce the wear on the dies.
Also a case trimmer and possible a case check guage. Necked cases will stretch with each firing, some makes more than others. You will eventually need to trim them back or the loaded round will not fit in the chamber and may give high than normal pressure on firing. With straight walled cases this is not so much of a problem. You might be able to get away with not trimming for the first reload but you'll soon get to a stage where the case will be too long. The first trim is usually a big one, after that it is just a case of taking off small amounts.


Hope this helps.

Where is the best place to get this kit from, Can't seem to find any stockists in gun mart?




+ 1 pair of safety specs
I wear mine when doing any reloading processes.
Taffy
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 8:29:29 AM EDT
check out smartreloader.com too.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:23:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 9:39:47 AM EDT by streetfighter]
Why reload when you've just bought this


Seriously though, when I reload, I do so on an industrial scale .
I try to do it only once or twice a year, and right now is that time of year.

Need a tumbler??
This Dillon will do 1250 cases at a time


Case trimming can be tedious and slow.
This Gracey electric trimmer will trim up to 1000 cases per hour


Shortages of brass.....not round here


Reloading bench with centre piece, Dillon 650. 800rds per hour.
Dillon 550 to the right.
Lyman T-Mag2 turret press to the left

Another view, if you look to the left, you can see the primer pocket swager and 6 stations on the Lyman


At the range.
When I work up a load, I take the kit with me and do it there. It's much more efficient.


Finally, a good supply of components is necessary and vital if you want to get in to accuracy heaven


That is all

Mark



Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:40:51 AM EDT
You forgot to mention what your fingers would look like trying to keep up with the Gracey 1000 rounds/hour rate!!
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 9:48:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By target-hunter:
You forgot to mention what your fingers would look like trying to keep up with the Gracey 1000 rounds/hour rate!!



Like this


And my toes look like this


Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:23:35 AM EDT
Oh my god....hobbit feet......

Vito - Grounds for account suspension.....

ETA - Neat reloading setup
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 1:24:02 PM EDT
That is an incredible set of feet!!
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 3:42:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By streetfighter:
Why reload when you've just bought this
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_005.jpg

Seriously though, when I reload, I do so on an industrial scale .
I try to do it only once or twice a year, and right now is that time of year.

Need a tumbler??
This Dillon will do 1250 cases at a time
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_008.jpg

Case trimming can be tedious and slow.
This Gracey electric trimmer will trim up to 1000 cases per hour
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_010.jpg

Shortages of brass.....not round here
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_009.jpg

Reloading bench with centre piece, Dillon 650. 800rds per hour.
Dillon 550 to the right.
Lyman T-Mag2 turret press to the left
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_Bench.jpg
Another view, if you look to the left, you can see the primer pocket swager and 6 stations on the Lyman
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Reloading_006.jpg

At the range.
When I work up a load, I take the kit with me and do it there. It's much more efficient.
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_102-0249_IMG.jpg

Finally, a good supply of components is necessary and vital if you want to get in to accuracy heaven
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_AR's_008.jpg

That is all

Mark







Mark that is some sweet reloading gear you have there.
So when is it convienient for me drop my used cases off to you for processing?

Cheers

Taffy
With my Lee happy shopper press I can manage about 200 rounds in an hour with prepared cases.
The wife gets the hump when I sit there in front of the TV cleaning primer pockets and triming the lengths. I was going to take some pics of my setup but after seeing Marks I'll give it a miss.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 3:45:24 PM EDT


Now ...why am I not surprised that you'd be able to have 12,600 rounds laying about.

But shit Mark....how the hell do you convince the Local PoPo you need that many rounds on your FAC?

Taffy
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 11:49:33 PM EDT
It's for the club.
Actually, both mine and the Club's FAC's cover it.
It'll all be gone in a couple of weeks, I just don't like to miss a good deal when I see one

Mark
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:26:44 AM EDT
Im dissapointed Mark No tracer??

James
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:35:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By UKGuy:
Im dissapointed Mark No tracer??

James



I wouldn't put that gungy crappy stuff through a nice lovely AR...........Then again!
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 6:09:31 AM EDT
There is always room for:-

Link Posted: 1/8/2006 11:07:50 AM EDT
I would give lee reloading gear a miss, and get yourself a Lyman or RCBS Rockchucker press, and dies, well its all about personal preference, I use RCBS comp dies for all my guns and have had fantastic results.

Dont forget you will require a hand primer they are quick to prime your cases.

A bullet puller.

Powder scales - electronic or manual.

Powder thrower - I have an RCBS Uniflow with micrometer.

Digital caliper for case and bullet measurement.

Like I said its all about choice and of course cost, if you want the results then start out with the best reloading gear you can afford.

So good luck with your reloading.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 11:26:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By streetfighter:

And my toes look like this
www.markbradley.talktalk.net/jse_Fingers_001.jpg




Only five toes on each foot? looks like I really do owe Scope-eye a fiver then.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 1:11:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By standby1:
I would give lee reloading gear a miss, and get yourself a Lyman or RCBS Rockchucker press, and dies, well its all about personal preference, I use RCBS comp dies for all my guns and have had fantastic results.

Dont forget you will require a hand primer they are quick to prime your cases.

A bullet puller.

Powder scales - electronic or manual.

Powder thrower - I have an RCBS Uniflow with micrometer.

Digital caliper for case and bullet measurement.

What sort of price does your setup come to then and have you had a bad experience with Lee equipment?

Like I said its all about choice and of course cost, if you want the results then start out with the best reloading gear you can afford.

So good luck with your reloading.

Mike


Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:46:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By standby1:

A bullet puller.




Remember pulling bullets is illegal and can only be done by a suitably licenced RFD or certified armourer.

But of course you can buy the puller so you can practice with dummies for when you get a licence
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 12:34:23 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Scope-eye:

Originally Posted By standby1:

A bullet puller.




Remember pulling bullets is illegal and can only be done by a suitably licenced RFD or certified armourer.

But of course you can buy the puller so you can practice with dummies for when you get a licence



Bizarre law this one, I've never understood why this is the case ? ? ? I can put rounds together but not take'em apart !?!
I'm sure local plod would just love me to turn up at my local station (if it was ever open, but thats another stoy) with a bunch of botched reloads.......

"Dispose of these please Mr Policeman"
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 8:27:17 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 8:27:56 AM EDT by Mousegunner-UK]

Originally posted by scope-eye

Remember pulling bullets is illegal and can only be done by a suitably licenced RFD or certified armourer.



I thought that this law had been repealed, our local firearms liasion officer said that it was now OK to dissassemble loaded rounds and had been so since Jan 2005.

Link Posted: 1/9/2006 10:21:21 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mousegunner-UK:

Originally posted by scope-eye

Remember pulling bullets is illegal and can only be done by a suitably licenced RFD or certified armourer.



I thought that this law had been repealed, our local firearms liasion officer said that it was now OK to dissassemble loaded rounds and had been so since Jan 2005.




You could be right, Dave. There has to be a first time for everything.

It was originally to stop unsavouries (read: Irish terrorists) from getting powder to make bombs. That was until they found it easier to use the ammo to shoot people.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 1:51:41 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 4:08:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Taffy223:
Reloading Heaven

Taffy



Crikey!!
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