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Posted: 1/31/2006 4:16:43 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 6:42:29 AM EDT
There is always next year, besides this doesnt mean that preemption isnt applicable to public schools in the first place.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 7:04:24 AM EDT

Gun bill gets shot down by panel
HB 1572, which would have allowed handguns on college campuses, died in subcommittee.
By Greg Esposito

A bill that would have given college students and employees the right to carry handguns on campus died with nary a shot being fired in the General Assembly.

House Bill 1572 didn't get through the House Committee on Militia, Police and Public Safety. It died Monday in the subcommittee stage, the first of several hurdles bills must overcome before becoming laws.

The bill was proposed by Del. Todd Gilbert, R-Shenandoah County, on behalf of the Virginia Citizens Defense League. Gilbert was unavailable Monday and spokesman Gary Frink would not comment on the bill's defeat other than to say the issue was dead for this General Assembly session.

Virginia Tech spokesman Larry Hincker was happy to hear the bill was defeated. "I'm sure the university community is appreciative of the General Assembly's actions because this will help parents, students, faculty and visitors feel safe on our campus."

Del. Dave Nutter, R-Christiansburg, would not comment Monday because he was not part of the subcommittee that discussed the bill.

Most universities in Virginia require students and employees, other than police, to check their guns with police or campus security upon entering campus. The legislation was designed to prohibit public universities from making "rules or regulations limiting or abridging the ability of a student who possesses a valid concealed handgun permit ... from lawfully carrying a concealed handgun."

The legislation allowed for exceptions for participants in athletic events, storage of guns in residence halls and military training programs.

Last spring a Virginia Tech student was disciplined for bringing a handgun to class, despite having a concealed handgun permit. Some gun owners questioned the university's authority, while the Virginia Association of Chiefs of Police came out against the presence of guns on campus.

In June, Tech's governing board approved a violence prevention policy reiterating its ban on students or employees carrying guns and prohibiting visitors from bringing them into campus facilities.

Link Posted: 1/31/2006 11:33:28 AM EDT
I'm gonna find out who I need to talk to about all this.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 11:40:10 AM EDT
what's the law about having guns in our cars while on campus?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 11:52:21 AM EDT
Assuming you're @ VT, you can't do it.

You can't even have ammunition in your vehicle.
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 8:17:31 PM EDT
is that Tech policy or local law?
Link Posted: 1/31/2006 9:03:16 PM EDT
It gets tricky because VT is considered to be a city to the state gov't since they have their own police force. I just know I won't try it unless something gets changed.
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 4:31:19 AM EDT
http://ar15.com/forums/topic.html?b=8&f=24&t=221927&page=2
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 5:03:16 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/1/2006 5:10:11 PM EDT by pevrs114]
Having a police department does not make a locality an incorporated city in the eyes of the state. Only incorporation can do that. Plenty of localities have police departments, including tiny communities like Crewe and Burkeville, medium towns like Farmville, and large counties like Chesterfield, but none of these localities hold city status



The way I understand the LAW, it doesn't matter if it's a VT policy or not, Commonwealth preemption law does not allow ANY locality, town, city, county, municipality, etc from overriding STATE law. That's the point of preemption. While you may face sanctions from the university (expulsion, termination of employment, etc), but if you were arrested and charged, I would be very confident that the case would be thrown out. That's one good part about the judicial system, is that once a BAD LAW is brought to light (by way of a criminal charge), the BAD LAW can be discarded. While this proactive attempt to replace the BAD LAW iwth a GOOD LAW failed, it doesn't necessarily mean that the BAD LAW would hold up in court.

The one exception is Virginia Commonwealth University, which is expressley listed in the Code
Link Posted: 2/1/2006 6:11:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By pevrs114:
Having a police department does not make a locality an incorporated city in the eyes of the state. Only incorporation can do that. Plenty of localities have police departments, including tiny communities like Crewe and Burkeville, medium towns like Farmville, and large counties like Chesterfield, but none of these localities hold city status



The way I understand the LAW, it doesn't matter if it's a VT policy or not, Commonwealth preemption law does not allow ANY locality, town, city, county, municipality, etc from overriding STATE law. That's the point of preemption. While you may face sanctions from the university (expulsion, termination of employment, etc), but if you were arrested and charged, I would be very confident that the case would be thrown out. That's one good part about the judicial system, is that once a BAD LAW is brought to light (by way of a criminal charge), the BAD LAW can be discarded. While this proactive attempt to replace the BAD LAW iwth a GOOD LAW failed, it doesn't necessarily mean that the BAD LAW would hold up in court.

The one exception is Virginia Commonwealth University, which is expressley listed in the Code



My failure, I wasn't really calling VT an incorporated city. I was saying that the VT police are an official police force. They aren't just campus security, they are a police force for the little "city" that VT is.

I believe you are right about all you've said, I just thought that maybe somehow it got tricky since they had a police force
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 11:44:22 AM EDT
I called Tech police this morning out of sheer boredom, really nice fellows compared to Blacksburg police who seemed a bit annoyed with my questions. You can't have a firearm in the car, but you're allowed to have ammunition within a closed container, not within the drivers reach. (According to Sargeant Reece) As for concealed knives, apparently Tech doesn't really care too much either, as long as "it's not a a sword". Hope this helps.
Link Posted: 2/2/2006 1:40:51 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wchiang:
I called Tech police this morning out of sheer boredom, really nice fellows compared to Blacksburg police who seemed a bit annoyed with my questions. You can't have a firearm in the car, but you're allowed to have ammunition within a closed container, not within the drivers reach. (According to Sargeant Reece) As for concealed knives, apparently Tech doesn't really care too much either, as long as "it's not a a sword". Hope this helps.



The officers will tell you that, but it's still against the Tech policy. No firearms, and no ammunition (read explosives) on campus. I believe it was Sgt Ramsey I talked to about it, and he said that it's against policy but he personally doesn't care.

An interesting side note for you, the Hokie Safety Handbook indicates that the Reece you talked to is an unranked officer
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