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Posted: 9/5/2010 8:42:13 PM EDT
Anyone in Northern Illinois (Naperville/Aurora) have a recommendation for a contractor that installs residential security window films, like the 3M products here?
http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Window_Film/Solutions/Markets-Products/Residential/Safety-Security_Window_Films/

I don't have any illusions that they'll stop a determined adversary, but a guy looking for a quick smash and grab would probably go find a softer target. More than that, I'd like them on the kids bedroom windows to keep them together if they shatter in a storm.

Anybody around here that has done this? I understand it's about $10+ a square foot, so I'd like to know that the contractor isn't a tool before getting into it.

Thanks!
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 11:50:10 PM EDT
That looks like a great inovation to further security for a home. I contacted them by e-mail and hope to hear more about the product and installers close by my town. Thanks for the heads up on that product!
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:54:10 AM EDT
Interesting product.
Has anyone ever seen a 3M product that was not top-notch?
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 8:15:21 AM EDT
Originally Posted By dab2:
That looks like a great inovation to further security for a home. I contacted them by e-mail and hope to hear more about the product and installers close by my town. Thanks for the heads up on that product!


Did you try their locate a dealer feature?

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Window_Film/Solutions/Support/Find_a_Dealer/
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 10:00:39 AM EDT
Yes, there are a few around here. But if anybody is likely to have experience with one of them, it's probably this crowd. That's why I asked. :)
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:10:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:24:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Tango7:
While I think they're great from a home safety standpoint, I have to wonder what effect they'll have under fire conditions - not so much from a flammability standpoint but from a lack of venting (both from heat and ventilation by us)..


Good point. They just put the big $$$ blast resistant variety in a few buildings I work in, so I assumed they worked the fire safety issues out. The films seem resistant to relatively large scale bowing forces, like blast, wind and impact. The glass still breaks, but the film keeps it in the frame. A fire axe would be a cutting force along a very narrow area, I suspect it would cut the film. I've never seen residential construction firefighters couldn't brute force their way into in less than 30 seconds. Film on the window? Just go through the wall - problem solved. . :)
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 12:25:37 PM EDT
A place I worked at considered a similar product, marketed at that time as an anti-vandalism tool. (The film took the etching, etc., sparing the glass.)

We stopped looking into it when we found that it had a marked impact on visibility, scratched during normal use/cleaning and had some peeling issues.

The fact that it cost more than the glass it was 'saving' was a sort of a problem, too. :)

OTOH, they may have improved it greatly; this was 10 years ago or so.

Larry
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 5:57:52 PM EDT
Midwest Glass & Trim is a family owned company with a golden reputation that's been in the same location for 30+ years. Contact Ron Mueller there. If he does it, it'll be done right. If he doesn't, he'll guide towards who does.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 6:41:47 PM EDT
It's about $4 a square foot and there was a place in Lombard, but I don't remember.
Link Posted: 9/6/2010 7:57:10 PM EDT
Originally Posted By InterestedBystander:
Originally Posted By dab2:
That looks like a great inovation to further security for a home. I contacted them by e-mail and hope to hear more about the product and installers close by my town. Thanks for the heads up on that product!


Did you try their locate a dealer feature?

http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/Window_Film/Solutions/Support/Find_a_Dealer/


Yes I did, thank you...so now I'm going to wait and see what I learn.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 7:57:59 PM EDT
Originally Posted By mikew:
Interesting product.
Has anyone ever seen a 3M product that was not top-notch?


You are right there. And alot of their products are still made in the U.S.of A.

Link Posted: 9/7/2010 12:22:29 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 1:55:41 PM EDT
The stuff I saw would cut/pierce with no problem. It's only a plastic film, after all-an edge or point just goes right through, in a sort of mega-saran wrap sort of way.

And I agree-most firefighers I know would just enjoy the added challenge. :)

Larry
Link Posted: 9/7/2010 2:09:09 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/7/2010 2:12:04 PM EDT by pondfly]
Originally Posted By Tango7:
While I think they're great from a home safety standpoint, I have to wonder what effect they'll have under fire conditions - not so much from a flammability standpoint but from a lack of venting (both from heat and ventilation by us)..


Unless you have direct flame impingement or heat in the room to the product melting point, it's going to be a PITA. Venting will involve opening (but that takes the fun out), or taking out frames to get out as a single unit.
On the brightside, it won't be sandwiched between glass.


As for being challenged by different strategies, there are enough to deal with let alone adding extra time to vent a window. It's supposed to be quick and easy until the slow truckes can vent the roof
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 12:25:42 PM EDT
See? This is why I threw this question out to the crowd. Not only did I get good information about the actual topic, I learned something I didn't know regarding unintended consequences and sparked a little smack-talking among the FFs.

I'm not that worried about fire, actually. We actually have multiple plans to get out. The home inspector I used when we bought the house was a FF doing a side job. When he came down from the attic he had two things to say. The first was that the dryer vent was the only one he had ever seen actually built properly and to code. The second was that if there was ever a fire, get the hell out at a dead run. Something about the roof joist construction being legal, but if it ever burned the roof would come down in a heartbeat. I just focused on the "get the hell out" part and took that to heart. He said it's actually quite common construction.

Tango7: Yes, the buildings with the blast-resistant films are sprinklered. Check your IM for details.

Link Posted: 9/8/2010 2:37:13 PM EDT
I have an rep from J&J Inc. out of Springfield coming to our house in two weeks to talk to us more about the 3M product. If it impresses us enough I'm going to ask for a bid to do our windows. Let you all know later.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 4:39:50 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dab2:
alot of their products are still made in the U.S.of A.



The make the best bandages at the moment, including one kind made from duct tape.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 6:55:47 PM EDT
Hoffsoft- The inspector was most likely referring to lightweight roof trusses. While the trusses allow nice long spans of ceilings, they are attached with very thin metal or plastic attachment plates. When one fails, the whole truss fails, and quickly.
Link Posted: 9/8/2010 7:37:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By pondfly:
Hoffsoft- The inspector was most likely referring to lightweight roof trusses. While the trusses allow nice long spans of ceilings, they are attached with very thin metal or plastic attachment plates. When one fails, the whole truss fails, and quickly.


This is an example of a truss roof collapse in Palatine. Fortunately the Batt Chief understood the construction and evacuated companies. Just thought I'd share.


Link Posted: 9/9/2010 2:01:53 PM EDT
WorstCaseScenario: Thanks for sharing and caring. You really know how to brighten up somebody's day.

It's a little scary that the technique is allowed in residential construction. If I hadn't been told, I never would have known. I can only guess at what else contractors are allowed to get away with.

But back on topic... I have a few calls out, I'll keep everybody updated.
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 3:05:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 9/9/2010 7:48:30 PM EDT
I almost lost my ass and crew a year ago last week when a hidden truss roof came down 1 min after we left the building. That makes three near misses in my career with trusses.
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