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Posted: 2/21/2006 1:51:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 8:22:14 PM EDT by Kooter]
Things I have learned so far while welding today:

DON"T accidently place your hand on a piece of metal you just finished welding on. Metal hot!

No matter how fast I try to fill in a place that I have burned through, the hole will grow faster
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 4:40:41 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kooter:
No matter how fast I try to fill in a place that I have burned through, the hole will grow faster



If a wire feed, turn down your wire feed speed, makes filling gaps or holes easy.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 4:49:39 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 7:58:44 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:13:38 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:


I thought you were a welder ?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:15:57 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:19:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 8:19:19 PM EDT by 2whiskeyP]
A little duct tape and all is good as new.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:20:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
Hence the



So what part of "wire feed speed" = amperage that you disagree with ?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:21:19 PM EDT

Before



After
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 8:49:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/21/2006 8:51:34 PM EDT by 1GUNRUNNER]
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:16:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
You feed less wire with the same voltage your holes are not going to disappear. You are thinking in terms of stick(SMAW) welding which is constant current and you can vary voltage by the feed of the filler.

ETA - Looks good Kooter. I don't have patience to weld sheet metal.



Thanks. I only wore out one grinding wheel to get it to look like that though

I definately need more practice. I welded in one area too long and warped the metal a little. Fortunately it is the floor and will be covered up with either linex(or something similar) or carpet.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 9:17:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
You feed less wire with the same voltage your holes are not going to disappear. You are thinking in terms of stick(SMAW) welding which is constant current and you can vary voltage by the feed of the filler.





I think the winner of this argument should be whichever one of you has the most electrical volts. If you are tied, it goes to the House of Representatives...
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:04:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
You feed less wire with the same voltage your holes are not going to disappear. You are thinking in terms of stick(SMAW) welding which is constant current and you can vary voltage by the feed of the filler.

ETA - Looks good Kooter. I don't have patience to weld sheet metal.



true backing off voltage will cool too but if you increase deposit rate with a loop pattern the weld will flatten out and he will not have to do as much work with the grinder.

Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:07:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By CarbineMonoxide:
I think the winner of this argument should be whichever one of you has the most electrical volts. If you are tied, it goes to the House of Representatives...



Nope, winner has to weld the doors shut in Olympia.
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:38:31 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:40:45 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Kooter get yourself a piece of brass or aluminum that you can use as a backer underneath your welds.




What does that do?
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 10:47:17 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 11:20:22 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:

Originally Posted By STRATIOTES:
If a wire feed, turn down your wire feed speed, makes filling gaps or holes easy.

true backing off voltage will cool too but if you increase deposit rate with a loop pattern the weld will flatten out and he will not have to do as much work with the grinder.




I don't know what you are trying to say 1GUNRUNNER, I would be glad to demonstrate it for you, I went through ECC's welding program in the 70's , been welding ever since BTDT
Link Posted: 2/21/2006 11:39:24 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 1:18:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/22/2006 1:20:14 AM EDT by R-32]
all right...

I turn down my power, and I hope my technique ( I cant spell I know) is enough to keep going, but If I turn down my juice and turn down my wirspeed I dont get anywhere, If I turn down my juice and speed up my wirespeed I just get stuck with strings of wire, if I slow down my wirespeed and up my juice all I do is weld my wore to my tip... If I dont have gas, it really sucks...

All I know is I make it work..( I learned to weld in FFA/Metal Shop.)

I have used a brass block, and it works...

What I do know...

Your stuff is looking fine Kooter.


Some day I will show ya all the burns in my armpit!
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 7:07:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:Kooter get yourself a piece of brass or aluminum that you can use as a backer underneath your welds.

We're not allowed to use brass as a heat sink / plate in the 'yard... I'm told the brass will contaminate the metal you're welding & make it weak.

Just a thought.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 7:11:36 PM EDT
R-32... A tip for dual-shield welding, get a piece of scrap metal and get a hand on the dial and one hand welding. Watch and listen to your weld to tune your set up quickly... I love to run hot, run fast.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 7:51:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:


Kooter get yourself a piece of brass or aluminum that you can use as a backer underneath your welds.




That and.... Brass works well for plug welding as in using as a backing wile welding holes. Tip...When I replace quarter panels on cars I have over lapped the metal 1/4-1/2". Also when welding sheet metal I keep a bucket of water and a rag right there. I weld an inch and them cool with water. It helps stop some with the warping.

Looks good Kooter.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 9:19:09 PM EDT

Originally Posted By RS_Coyote:

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:


Kooter get yourself a piece of brass or aluminum that you can use as a backer underneath your welds.




That and.... Brass works well for plug welding as in using as a backing wile welding holes. Tip...When I replace quarter panels on cars I have over lapped the metal 1/4-1/2". Also when welding sheet metal I keep a bucket of water and a rag right there. I weld an inch and them cool with water. It helps stop some with the warping.

Looks good Kooter.



On the second panel I welded in I would weld about an inch or so, then move to a different spot and weld an inch there, then come back, etc.... I just kept jumping around until it was all welded in. Seemed to work better for me than staying in one spot until it was done.
Link Posted: 2/22/2006 10:57:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kooter:

I definately need more practice. I welded in one area too long and warped the metal a little. Fortunately it is the floor and will be covered up with either linex(or something similar) or carpet.RUST!



FIXT!

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 12:32:22 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Scollins:

Originally Posted By Kooter:

I definately need more practice. I welded in one area too long and warped the metal a little. Fortunately it is the floor and will be covered up with either linex(or something similar) or carpet.RUST!



FIXT!







I would also like to ad that I will wear my welding gloves next time. The sunburn(or is it flashburn) on the back of my hand is itchy, but it hurts to scratch it
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 12:51:37 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RS_Coyote:That and.... Brass works well for plug welding as in using as a backing wile welding holes. Tip...When I replace quarter panels on cars I have over lapped the metal 1/4-1/2". Also when welding sheet metal I keep a bucket of water and a rag right there. I weld an inch and them cool with water. It helps stop some with the warping.

Looks good Kooter.

I dunno man... The last thing I want next to my hot welds is water (or lots of wind, for that matter). Last thing I'd want is cracking or metal fatigue.

And Koot, it really does look good man
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:48:29 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 9:23:26 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rune75:
I dunno man... The last thing I want next to my hot welds is water (or lots of wind, for that matter). Last thing I'd want is cracking or metal fatigue.

And Koot, it really does look good man



Keep in mind, Rune75 is doing some MILSPEC welding. When it comes to the Navy, they wrote a few books on how / what / where / when / why things get welded. Each book looks like the New York City White Pages. That's why you don't see the islands just fall off of aircraft carriers, cruisers inexplicably split in half, etc. In other words, even though industry-standard practices are good enough for 99% of the work you'll encounter; the U.S. Navy has a higher standard.

Let's not even get into the whole SUBSAFE deal. . .

My $0.02
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 11:10:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JS98010:


Keep in mind, Rune75 is doing some MILSPEC welding.
Let's not even get into the whole SUBSAFE deal. . .

My $0.02



Are you saying old farm implements do not rise to the level of MILSPEC
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 11:23:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By STRATIOTES:

Originally Posted By JS98010:


Keep in mind, Rune75 is doing some MILSPEC welding.
Let's not even get into the whole SUBSAFE deal. . .

My $0.02



Are you saying old farm implements do not rise to the level of MILSPEC



Shit, I'll hook bumper to bumper with any Sub.....
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 1:28:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/23/2006 1:31:36 PM EDT by Belial]

Originally Posted By JS98010:

Originally Posted By Rune75:
I dunno man... The last thing I want next to my hot welds is water (or lots of wind, for that matter). Last thing I'd want is cracking or metal fatigue.

And Koot, it really does look good man



Keep in mind, Rune75 is doing some MILSPEC welding. When it comes to the Navy, they wrote a few books on how / what / where / when / why things get welded. Each book looks like the New York City White Pages. That's why you don't see the islands just fall off of aircraft carriers, cruisers inexplicably split in half, etc. In other words, even though industry-standard practices are good enough for 99% of the work you'll encounter; the U.S. Navy has a higher standard.

Let's not even get into the whole SUBSAFE deal. . .

My $0.02



Is this the Milspec Way?? Higher Standard Way?? way to guess??


Originally Posted By Rune75:
R-32... A tip for dual-shield welding, get a piece of scrap metal and get a hand on the dial and one hand welding. Watch and listen to your weld to tune your set up quickly... I love to run hot, run fast.



It does contrary to popular opinion take a certain amount of amps to get enough penetration to make things stick together no matter what it sounds like. This method gets you a little more than nothing. I would love to see this method listed in a current welding manual.

The quenching of sheet metal with water and usuing heat sinks is very common. You would not however want to quench anything that needs to be certified structural or at least get caught doing it.

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 2:28:28 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Belial:
or at least get caught doing it.




Can I barrow your stamp ?
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:12:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By STRATIOTES:

Originally Posted By Belial:
or at least get caught doing it.




Can I barrow your stamp ?



Let me think about it...

<­BR>

Nope....
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 7:14:19 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 9:58:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
I saw a WABO test that was quenched the entire process....and passed.



CABO WABO?

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 10:24:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 5:20:00 PM EDT
Please don't tell me someone wasted good Tequila on a test plate!!!!

Link Posted: 2/24/2006 6:57:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Belial:
It does contrary to popular opinion take a certain amount of amps to get enough penetration to make things stick together no matter what it sounds like. This method gets you a little more than nothing. I would love to see this method listed in a current welding manual.

Of course. But I think so long as a person knows what their welds should look like, knows the light pattern, knows the constant sound, sees there are not many splats of metal, then hand tuning a dual shield setup while welding on scrap is a good starting ground for propper amperage/flow. Or do you disagree?


The quenching of sheet metal with water and usuing heat sinks is very common. You would not however want to quench anything that needs to be certified structural or at least get caught doing it.
I'm sure it is. But not where I work. I'm pretty sure Koot's weldes won't have between a couple hundred to a couple thousand lives depend on his workmanship. As JS98010 said, we get the awesome fun of "supposedly" memorizing 3 medium city sized telephone book like reference books (or at least be able to find the needed info quickly in them).

Guess I"m coming off as a dick. Sorry if I am.
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 10:28:48 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rune75:
Of course. But I think so long as a person knows what their welds should look like, knows the light pattern, knows the constant sound, sees there are not many splats of metal, then hand tuning a dual shield setup while welding on scrap is a good starting ground for propper amperage/flow. Or do you disagree?



I think where I am going with this is that a "Newbie" so to speak probably doesn't know what it should look, sound, or taste like. Someone says you weld "Milspec" and then you when you give advice like that it makes me wonder. (Not that my opinion matters!!)


I'm pretty sure Koot's weldes won't have between a couple hundred to a couple thousand lives depend on his workmanship.


And quenching makes a difference on floorboard repair how??

BTW Kooter looks good from the pics....Just keep your hands on the beer not the hot metal....
Link Posted: 2/25/2006 10:36:41 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Belial:
BTW Kooter looks good from the pics....Just keep your hands on the beer not the hot metal....



Ice cold beverage containers have long been used as burn treatment devices as long as there has been welders getting burned by their work.
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