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Posted: 9/4/2010 6:48:07 AM EDT
It opened yesterday 9/3/10, but only at some little theater in Scottsdale, The Camelview.

Tillman being well known in the valley, you would think they would have had a wider release.

I contacted Harkins, they tell me it is the distributor who dictates film availability???

Either way, I think it's BS.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 1:22:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/4/2010 1:23:02 PM EDT by ORIGINAL-Waterdog]
Went to see it, pretty sad. Instead of being straight up with the family, gov just danced around what really happened.
Link Posted: 9/4/2010 9:08:06 PM EDT
They needed a hero story, not a hero-getting-friendly-f*cked story.

I have nothing but respect for Pat Tillman. He is a hero to me, like all war veterans are. The gov screwed his family, like all govs do.

I'm not sure how much I want to see this movie, to be honest. I know the story, and it sucks. Can we move past it now? Is there value here? We all already know that the gov lies, but shouldn't we let Pat Tillman continue on in history as a hero, and not a fall guy or the center of some conspiracy?
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 5:42:44 AM EDT
Agreed Rizzo, but being a army vet myself I'm torn on this subject for a few reasons... 1st why is so much made about him? There are many vets that have been killed in action from enemy fire and friendly fire and so many don't get the coverge that he has other than being a star athlete .. 2nd iI feel for the family for a fallen hero and my heart goes out to them, and for the gov. trying to cover it up is BULLSHIT, but it happens. I try to see the light in this but again I am torn , I dont mean to sound cold about it its just how I feel.... The other part that I am torn on is there are so so many others that have faught in past wars then need reconition for thier feets as well . Please dont take my responce as me being cold but its just how I feel.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:33:44 AM EDT
randeeak47 - I also served in the Army, and I couldn't agree with you more. There are scores of Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, and Airmen who have died over the years due to friendly fire incidents who will never be recognized or singled-out because of the way that they died. That does not steal of their honor, however, and they are no different than those who died under enemy fire - they deserve the utmost respect from all of us, no matter how they met their end. I served with a guy who fell off the ramp of a chopper and died from a head injury during a training accident. I honor him the same as I honor my friend who was shot and killed in Iraq.

Without Googling it, how many of you can tell me what happened near Shawali Kowt, Afghanistan on December 5, 2001? Possibly the worst friendly fire incident in the entire war - 3 U.S. SF Soldiers and almost 30 Afghan Guerrillas were killed, and over 25 U.S. and 50 Afghan soldiers were wounded, including Hamid Karzai, the man who would later become the President of Afghanistan. The incident also ended the careers of 9 of the U.S. SF soldiers who were wounded there. Because of the sensitive nature of the operation, the full details of the incident didn't become available immediately, but once everything was out in the open did the families of the soldiers raise a fuss? Did the media "blow the lid off"? The government still tried to pull the "everything's under control" act, though the Air Force CCT that ultimately was responsible stood up and took the blame, from the beginning really. It was his act of forgetting to clear an equipment verification GPS coord a few feet in front if him that brought the 2,000lb penetrating JDAM down on top of the whole crew. Should he be held responsible? No, not officially - he holds himself responsible enough. He remains in the USAF and now teaches other CCTs how to call in close air support, and specifically how to avoid his mistake.

My point to all of that is this - friendly fire happens. It is never good and it is always tragic. The government will often try to cover it up, as it always try to cover its ass, and sometimes the truth will come out. But we should let those men that died in such accidents leave this world with their honor intact, try as best as we can to learn from the mistakes that led to their untimely deaths, and then move on and move forward. They would want that, I think - and not to be drug through the mud of the conspiracy world.
Link Posted: 9/5/2010 8:20:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By rizzo1318:
There are scores of Soldiers, Marines, Sailors, and Airmen who have died over the years due to friendly fire incidents who will never be recognized or singled-out because of the way that they died. That does not steal of their honor, however, and they are no different than those who died under enemy fire - they deserve the utmost respect from all of us, no matter how they met their end.
.


You know, I've had difficulty with the topic of Tillman. While he was a great football player and an Army Ranger, I don't understand the hype of him leaving his NFL career for doing what he believed in. How many other people in the U.S. felt the need to leave their jobs and give up a lot to sign up with the military after Sept 11th?

He's missed just as badly as all the other heroes in the military, no matter what he did before he served.

Link Posted: 9/6/2010 3:31:39 PM EDT
Havn't seen this one yet;
I did go see Restrepo on Friday; worth the time guys.
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