Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Page Hometown » Ohio
Posted: 3/8/2006 1:11:39 PM EDT
SUB H.B. 347 passed the Ohio House of Representatives 76-18.

Today the Ohio House of Representative passed Sub HR 347. This bill will reform and improve concealed carry and improve the safety and security of our state. The substitute bill was the result of strenuous efforts by Representative Aslanides (R-94) and gun rights groups to address concerns of interested parties while still maintaining as much of the original bill as possible. While many, diverse interests were “at the table” during this process, the substitute bill is still very favorable to gun owners.

The broad bi-partisan support for this bill proves that personal safety and security are important issues to Republicans and Democrats alike, whether they live in rural or urban areas. Women are particularly vulnerable to crime, and the number of female legislators voting for HB347 speaks to its importance for the safety that all women care about.

The most important aspects to gun owners are uniform laws throughout the state and the elimination of “plain sight” for concealed carry license holders (CHL’s). Background checks will become uniform, as will the standard for sealed/expunged records. Restrictions on police officers have been eased. A complete review of the legislation is available on our web site, http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/article3016.html.
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 1:43:50 PM EDT
Not too familiar with the process.. In dumb peoples terms, how likely is it that this will become law and how long do we think it will take to do so? Im tired of the plain sight shit......
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 2:36:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By viper5194:
Im tired of the plain sight shit......




+1
Link Posted: 3/8/2006 2:36:43 PM EDT
What does this mean pertaining to expunged records

Link Posted: 3/9/2006 8:56:03 AM EDT
Sealed or expunged records do not disqualify an applicant for a CHL.

http://www.buckeyefirearms.org/article3013.html


Pete.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 9:04:39 AM EDT
I've heard Taft may veto it. The ass.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 10:09:10 AM EDT
Gun bill in Senate; veto looms
Measure would bar harsher city bans
Thursday, March 09, 2006
Jim Siegel
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

A bill that would erase Columbus’ assault-weapons ban passed the Ohio House yesterday, but Gov. Bob Taft still is poised to veto it over provisions on how people carry guns in vehicles.Fucking RINO

The bill, which makes a number of changes to Ohio’s nearly 2-year-old law that allows residents to carry concealed handguns, would no longer permit local governments to pass gun laws that go beyond the restrictions set by state lawmakers.

Columbus officials approved an assault-weapons ban last summer. But under the House bill, cities also would be unable to ban guns from parks or other places not already designated as gun-free zones in state law.

Rep. James Aslanides, a Coshocton Republican and sponsor of the bill, said it’s unreasonable to expect someone with a gun permit to be aware of various gun laws every time he or she enters a different town. People deserve to be treated the same under one consistent law, he said before the bill was passed, 76-19. It now goes to the Senate.

Mike Brown, spokesman for Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman, said the bill is proof that GOP lawmakers are more interested in serving the gun lobby than protecting residents.

"It completely disrespects local control and the will of people in government in the towns where they live," Brown said. "It also disrespects common sense and the ability of cities of any size to keep people safe."Fucking Libtard

Three Columbus Democrats, Reps. Joyce Beatty, Mike Mitchell and Dan Stewart, voted against the measure. Beatty, an opponent of expanding gun access, said Columbus should have the right to pass its own gun laws.

House Democrats said very little about the gun bill during yesterday’s debate. Beatty, the minority leader, said her caucus always has split on the gun issue, and she was proud that her members voted to represent their districts.

House Speaker Jon A. Husted, R-Kettering, said he was shocked that the Democrats barely uttered a peep about the gun bill.

"I guess we’re all smart now that their governor candidate agrees with us on these issues," Husted said, referring to Democrat Ted Strickland, a gun-rights supporter.

For the bill to become law, it’s Republican Taft, not the Democrats, who offers the biggest obstacle.

Just as he did during the last gun-bill debate more than two years ago, Taft continues to threaten a veto of any bill that is opposed by any major lawenforcement organization.

Current law requires that a permit holder in a vehicle either lock the gun away or carry it in a holster that is in plain sight. The State Highway Patrol, concerned about trooper safety during traffic stops, objected to allowing people to carry guns in vehicles, and the plain-sight wording was worked in as a compromise.

"We supported the compromise last time around on it, we thought that was a good compromise, and we believe that’s where Ohio should be," Taft said yesterday.

Aslanides and Husted said the requirement is both unreasonable and unenforceable. The bill removes the plain-sight requirement because "it’s legal fiction that can’t be reasonably complied with by Ohio citizens," Aslanides said.

But the Highway Patrol says there has been no confusion thus far in enforcing the plainsight provision, and it should not be altered.

Sen. Steve Austria, of Beavercreek, the point person for Senate Republicans on gun issues, said it’s important that lawenforcement officers be able to identify whether a vehicle occupant is carrying a gun. But he said there is a better alternative than the plain-sight provision.

"We will be trying to work with law enforcement to try and come up with a solution they are comfortable with," he said.

A second provision that Taft disliked — no longer allowing journalists access to lists of conceal-carry permit holders — was pulled from the bill. Aslanides said he hopes to get that provision into a separate public-records bill that’s expected to pass the House within a few weeks.

Dispatch reporters Mark Niquette and Joe Hallett contributed to this story.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 11:23:15 AM EDT
TAFT CAN SUCK IT!!!

Cant wait to get that RINO out of office..

as for it getting through the house...

WOOT
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 11:49:55 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 5:17:51 PM EDT
In Ohio, a veto override requires a 3/5 majority. That equates to 60 out of 99 Representatives, and 20 out of 33 Senators.

Well, a 3/5 majority is needed to override a veto. Thats 60/99 Reps, and this passed with 76. HOPEFULLY thats enough for them, but I'm not as sure about the Senate. Gotta hope that too many of them aren't sucking on Bobby's tit for an appointment (and hope that a Democrat or two wants to embarrass him?)

I have no clue how the Senate counts up.
Link Posted: 3/9/2006 6:26:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Chokey:
Gun bill in Senate; veto looms
Measure would bar harsher city bans
Thursday, March 09, 2006
Jim Siegel
THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

A bill that would erase Columbus’ assault-weapons ban passed the Ohio House yesterday, but Gov. Bob Taft still is poised to veto it over provisions on how people carry guns in vehicles.Fucking RINO

The bill, which makes a number of changes to Ohio’s nearly 2-year-old law that allows residents to carry concealed handguns, would no longer permit local governments to pass gun laws that go beyond the restrictions set by state lawmakers.

Columbus officials approved an assault-weapons ban last summer. But under the House bill, cities also would be unable to ban guns from parks or other places not already designated as gun-free zones in state law.

Rep. James Aslanides, a Coshocton Republican and sponsor of the bill, said it’s unreasonable to expect someone with a gun permit to be aware of various gun laws every time he or she enters a different town. People deserve to be treated the same under one consistent law, he said before the bill was passed, 76-19. It now goes to the Senate.

Mike Brown, spokesman for Columbus Mayor Michael B. Coleman, said the bill is proof that GOP lawmakers are more interested in serving the gun lobby than protecting residents.

"It completely disrespects local control and the will of people in government in the towns where they live," Brown said. "It also disrespects common sense and the ability of cities of any size to keep people safe."Fucking Libtard

Three Columbus Democrats, Reps. Joyce Beatty, Mike Mitchell and Dan Stewart, voted against the measure. Beatty, an opponent of expanding gun access, said Columbus should have the right to pass its own gun laws.

House Democrats said very little about the gun bill during yesterday’s debate. Beatty, the minority leader, said her caucus always has split on the gun issue, and she was proud that her members voted to represent their districts.

House Speaker Jon A. Husted, R-Kettering, said he was shocked that the Democrats barely uttered a peep about the gun bill.

"I guess we’re all smart now that their governor candidate agrees with us on these issues," Husted said, referring to Democrat Ted Strickland, a gun-rights supporter.

For the bill to become law, it’s Republican Taft, not the Democrats, who offers the biggest obstacle.

Just as he did during the last gun-bill debate more than two years ago, Taft continues to threaten a veto of any bill that is opposed by any major lawenforcement organization.

Current law requires that a permit holder in a vehicle either lock the gun away or carry it in a holster that is in plain sight. The State Highway Patrol, concerned about trooper safety during traffic stops, objected to allowing people to carry guns in vehicles, and the plain-sight wording was worked in as a compromise.

"We supported the compromise last time around on it, we thought that was a good compromise, and we believe that’s where Ohio should be," Taft said yesterday.

Aslanides and Husted said the requirement is both unreasonable and unenforceable. The bill removes the plain-sight requirement because "it’s legal fiction that can’t be reasonably complied with by Ohio citizens," Aslanides said.

But the Highway Patrol says there has been no confusion thus far in enforcing the plainsight provision, and it should not be altered.

Sen. Steve Austria, of Beavercreek, the point person for Senate Republicans on gun issues, said it’s important that lawenforcement officers be able to identify whether a vehicle occupant is carrying a gun. But he said there is a better alternative than the plain-sight provision.

"We will be trying to work with law enforcement to try and come up with a solution they are comfortable with," he said.

A second provision that Taft disliked — no longer allowing journalists access to lists of conceal-carry permit holders — was pulled from the bill. Aslanides said he hopes to get that provision into a separate public-records bill that’s expected to pass the House within a few weeks.

Dispatch reporters Mark Niquette and Joe Hallett contributed to this story.



You forgot that last one. What good does that do anyone. honestly!? It makes me so argry yet makes such little sense to me im without words
Page Hometown » Ohio
Top Top