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Page Hometown » Ohio
Posted: 1/7/2006 7:11:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/7/2006 7:13:36 PM EDT by Hector_X]
At least according to the Humane Society, as quoted in the Akron Beacon Journal:



Ease the plight of pets. Here's how
Bring them inside, don't get Botox, eat less meat, shoot skeet not animals, and volunteer at shelters

Animal aficionados who don't have room in their houses for yet another creature can still help the plight of animals in the new year.

The Humane Society of the U.S. suggests these New Year's resolutions -- is it ever really too late?

• Bring your pets inside. Free-roaming cats starve, are attacked by other animals and contract diseases.

Dogs chained outside are victims of the elements and cruel people and often develop behavioral problems such as barking. They are pack animals and need companionship.

• When you do see dogs tethered outside, encourage your neighbors to make sure their outdoor animals have plenty of water that isn't frozen and that they are fed properly.

Report neglect to your local humane society or animal protective league.

In Summit County, that's the Humane Society of Greater Akron, home of Akron's very own animal cops, Tim Harland and Matt Saladin, said Richard Farkus, executive director.

Humane officers are appointed by the Summit County Probate Court and are on duty 24 hours a day. Part of their job is to educate owners about proper animal care, so they can and do bring about positive changes in negative situations.

The number is 330-657-2010.

• Keep toxic chemicals off your lawn, the Humane Society said. Make your environment safer for people and animals.

• Keep toxic chemicals off your face, too. Botox is tested on animals, some of whom suffer paralysis and death, says the Humane Society.

• Eat less meat, and when you do, buy products labeled organic, free-range or certified humane. This tells you the animals on your plate didn't suffer needlessly.

• Teach peace.

• Shoot skeet, not animals. Try wildlife tracking instead of hunting. Hunting has opened the door to numerous animal abuses, the Humane Society says.

• Give the gift of compassion.

Volunteer your time and whatever you can afford to worthy organizations. They are invariably the shelters in your own neighborhood.

Connie Bloom shares your passion for pets. You can reach her at 330-996-3568 or e-mail her at cbloom@ thebeaconjournal.com.



The hunters I know spoil their dogs rotten. Who else is going to swim after the geese?
And WTF about eating meat. Most house pets, dogs and cats, are unrepentant carnivores.
I thought the Humane Society was doing the Good Work, keeping pets healthy but apparently they are batshit crazy.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 10:26:28 PM EDT
The Humane Society has gone down the path of PETA and are dumping big money into anti hunting efforts.
It makes me sick every time I see that little yellow plastic tearey eyed dog with a slot in his head at the local D.Q. just knowing that people pour their spare change in thinking they are doing something benevelont. When in reality they are sometimes unwittingley financing anti-conservation efforts.

ODOW and Sportsmen have worked hard to accomplish a balance of nature a coexistance that we enjoy through regulated legal harvest (hunting seasons and limits) . It makes me so that mad I would like to collect the contents of all those plastic dogs and donate it to Ted Nugent. That would be poetic justice.

The next time the NRA sends you another envolope full of junk mail dont throw it away JOIN and if you already a member like Myself....GOD BLESS YOU for making the difference. Take that envolope from inside that is addressed to them and put a check in or a couple ones or a five what ever you think is in that little Humane Socitey jar down at the corner store. Send it to them with a note telling them to use it for fighting to protect hunting rights. And tell your friends about What the Humane Society is up to.
Link Posted: 1/7/2006 11:01:55 PM EDT
Of course hunting is a gateway to animal abuse. I thought everyone knew that.

Why I myself have on many occasions returned home from groundhog hunting, and continued the bloodbath by shooting my kid's gerbil, our cats, the neighbor's cocker spaniel and livestock along the way.

Once you start a killin, you just can't quit.



Sometimes I duct tape the dog to a chair, and make him watch slides of various animals I've killed, and I say "DO YOU SEE!?!?! DO YOU SEE!?!?!?"

If that's not abuse, I dunno what is.
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:25:00 PM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
Of course hunting is a gateway to animal abuse. I thought everyone knew that.

Why I myself have on many occasions returned home from groundhog hunting, and continued the bloodbath by shooting my kid's gerbil, our cats, the neighbor's cocker spaniel and livestock along the way.

Once you start a killin, you just can't quit.



Sometimes I duct tape the dog to a chair, and make him watch slides of various animals I've killed, and I say "DO YOU SEE!?!?! DO YOU SEE!?!?!?"

If that's not abuse, I dunno what is.


LMAO!!!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 1/8/2006 3:36:28 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:23:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By swingset:
Of course hunting is a gateway to animal abuse. I thought everyone knew that.

Why I myself have on many occasions returned home from groundhog hunting, and continued the bloodbath by shooting my kid's gerbil, our cats, the neighbor's cocker spaniel and livestock along the way.

Once you start a killin, you just can't quit.



Sometimes I duct tape the dog to a chair, and make him watch slides of various animals I've killed, and I say "DO YOU SEE!?!?! DO YOU SEE!?!?!?"

If that's not abuse, I dunno what is.



lmao
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