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Posted: 3/16/2006 11:06:33 PM EDT
Hey Guys, I'm only recently considering an M1 from CMP (yes I'm retarded for not considering one earlier!!) and I was curious what is necessary to convert one to .308. And is it reversible? Thanks!
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 11:13:45 PM EDT
All that is neccessary is a barrel change, and if you want, you can put a block in the magazine well to prevent accidently loading .30-06. Of course thats not really an issue unless you have Garands in both .308 and .30-06. If you ever want to convert it back, just put the original .30-06 barrel back on, or get a new .30-06 barrel, whatever you want.
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 3:28:13 AM EDT

ditto......


Swampy

Garands forever
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 3:39:06 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/17/2006 6:50:23 AM EDT by mr_wilson]
Why would anyone want to do this?

M1 Garands are 30-06 rifles, if ya wanted a 308 rifle why not buy a M14, FAL, DSA or AR10.

Mike
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 4:44:39 AM EDT
Why would anyone want to do this? ammo is cheaper and because it is fun to work on Garands. I have converted several of mine to 7.62.
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 6:46:53 AM EDT
I'm also low on funds but want a CMP garand before it's too late. So I won't feel bad buying one with a pitted barrel if I know I'm going to change it out.

Thanks for the help!
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 11:09:16 AM EDT
Century Arms currently has Korean M2 ball ammo on enbloc clips available for .175c per round delivered. The ammo is corrosive with reloadbale brass. That is the current price of 308 milsurp ammo delivered without reloadable brass.

Considering this, the cost of ammo is not really a factor between 30-06 and 308. If you are afraid of corrosive ammo, then you are not up to speed on your basic firearms knowledge.
Link Posted: 3/17/2006 2:29:30 PM EDT
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 5:09:42 AM EDT
There is a great article on it here: Give it a look.Conversion

Link Posted: 3/18/2006 5:31:36 AM EDT
I've got one; getting a beater CMP garand, rebarrelling, reparking, bedding, and NM-modding the trigger and handguards is about 20-30% cheaper than purchasing an M1A.

Oh, and you'll have a forged receiver and all USGI parts, too.

Don't get me wrong, I have three M1As and love them all. But, I can get an M1, do all of the above, and have $$ left over for 2K rounds of ammo.
Link Posted: 3/18/2006 5:15:35 PM EDT
I bought a CMP racker with the intent to change it to .308. I looked for a WWII serial number that had nice metal and wood and a crappy barrel. I then took it to Geneseo where the friendly folks at Springfield Armory changed the crappy barrel for a brand new 308. Cost me $209.00 plus the share for our dipsh@#t governor. Tolat $213.00 and some change. Took about 2 hours for the change.

RWW
Link Posted: 3/19/2006 4:51:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 4:19:38 AM EDT

Because truth be known, a NM Garand will out shoot a NM M-14 every day of the week (barrel harmonics disturbance @ gas system pressurization). Also, with the extra room in the Garand receiver, you have lots of room to long load and still fit into the clip.


Ditto...

Many prominent former Marine Corps rifle team Armorers confirm this.......

Best to all,
Swampy

Garands forever Swampworks Inc. / JLK Bullets
Link Posted: 3/20/2006 6:49:39 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 11:49:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By raf:
IMHO, there is no way, short of a real emergency, that I will shoot any kind of corrosive ammo through any gas gun.

To clean the gun right requires repeated cleanings of any place that the gas touches, which is pretty much the whole metallic surface of the gun.

There is a reason why few old M1s have their original barrel, while many M1 Carbines still do.

M1 Carbine ammo was never made in corrosive form.



Agreed. No matter how many times you take a gas system apart and clean it after shooting corrosive ammo, you will most likely find rust. It takes a long time to get rid of all of it. Most people have a difficult time correctly field stripping a Garand, so unless you are proficient in taking the rifle apart and putting it back together, I'd steer very clear of corrosive ammo.

Link Posted: 3/25/2006 3:49:36 PM EDT
If you do shoot corrosive ammo, immediately wipe out the bore with a patch soaked in WD40 and leave some in the bore until you clean which should be as soon as possible. Also wipe the bolt face with it and squirt some along the oprod and into the the back of the gas cylinder. After cleaning, wipe the bore again with WD40 and after a couple days wipe it out again.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 6:33:14 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 6:33:45 PM EDT by vanilla_gorilla]

Originally Posted By patriot73:

Originally Posted By raf:
IMHO, there is no way, short of a real emergency, that I will shoot any kind of corrosive ammo through any gas gun.

To clean the gun right requires repeated cleanings of any place that the gas touches, which is pretty much the whole metallic surface of the gun.

There is a reason why few old M1s have their original barrel, while many M1 Carbines still do.

M1 Carbine ammo was never made in corrosive form.



Agreed. No matter how many times you take a gas system apart and clean it after shooting corrosive ammo, you will most likely find rust. It takes a long time to get rid of all of it. Most people have a difficult time correctly field stripping a Garand, so unless you are proficient in taking the rifle apart and putting it back together, I'd steer very clear of corrosive ammo.




This is why I bought nearly 400 rounds of KA by accident, and it remains sitting in storage to this day. I keep telling myself one day I'm going to dedicate myself to shooting it just to get the reloadable cases, but I can't bring myself to shoot it in my beloved Garand, so it sits.

I can't imagine someone having a difficult time stripping the Garand. It's not rocket surgery.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 10:33:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By patriot73:

Originally Posted By raf:
IMHO, there is no way, short of a real emergency, that I will shoot any kind of corrosive ammo through any gas gun.

To clean the gun right requires repeated cleanings of any place that the gas touches, which is pretty much the whole metallic surface of the gun.

There is a reason why few old M1s have their original barrel, while many M1 Carbines still do.

M1 Carbine ammo was never made in corrosive form.



Agreed. No matter how many times you take a gas system apart and clean it after shooting corrosive ammo, you will most likely find rust. It takes a long time to get rid of all of it. Most people have a difficult time correctly field stripping a Garand, so unless you are proficient in taking the rifle apart and putting it back together, I'd steer very clear of corrosive ammo.




That has not been my experience. Opinions do vary, however.
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:03:07 PM EDT
Where can you get a .308 barrel at?
Link Posted: 3/26/2006 5:20:12 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Lowco:
Where can you get a .308 barrel at?



www.fulton-armory.com
www.warbirdscustomguns.com
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 12:38:56 PM EDT
I JUST did this with a Blue Sky import in which the barrel was shot out. DGR did a wonderful job with it, it functions perfectly with .308 Aussie surplus and with handloads. Very accurate as well. I stuck on a new Boyd's laminated stock that i bought for a song, and it looks like a million bucks.
Normally, it would offend my senses to do such a thing to a Garand...but this turned out so nice, I have NO regrets.
Again, DGR sis a fine job and I'd recommend them to anyone.
Plain Old Bill
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 1:46:27 PM EDT
Springfield Armory. $209.00 installed and out the door.

RWW
Link Posted: 3/27/2006 2:38:53 PM EDT
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