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Posted: 3/6/2006 4:46:45 AM EDT
Hi guys, I have fallen into a situation where I need some money and I am considering selling my M1A. I bought it new about three years ago, and I have never fired it. I am just afraid that I am letting go of a good thing, that I will be hard pressed to come across again. I know the word on the street is that the M14's put out by SA were not that great due to replacement parts and poor quality, but I also heard that some of them were good to go. Is there anything specific to look for in order to determine if this is a keeper? If it makes any difference, I am basically selling it to come up with the money for two M1 Garands that I have on order with the CMP, and to catch up on a bill because I bought an extra gun recently. Thanks for any info you can provide.

Oh yeah, one of the local dealers does consignment where they get 10% of the sale. That is how I plan on selling it. He says for the area, it should sell within the week.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:53:55 AM EDT
Most serious M1A buyers will want to know the serial number range (i.e., 1234xx) and the markings on the bolt, operating rod, barrel, and side of trigger group housing to know if they are USGI parts.

If you post the markings here, we can decode for you.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 5:57:14 AM EDT
I'll throw-out the usual advice on selling a gun... DON'T! If there's any other way you can raise the cash, then do that instead. You'll likely regret selling it. It'd be one thing if you'd fired it and hated it, but that's not the case here. I bought a new SA M1A in January and I love it. Only have 240 rounds through it so far, but it's flawless. Only sell it if you really don't like it.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 6:05:51 AM EDT
you want to sell and unfired M1A to help pay fore two CMP Garands?
are you nuts?

KEEP it
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 6:13:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2006 6:14:47 AM EDT by NovaHokie9]
I debated the same thing last year when I went into another gun buying frenzy.

I came to my senses and still have my M1A.

Mine is a late 2002 model and I have had zero problems outside of a questionable mag.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 6:14:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By spartacus2002:
Most serious M1A buyers will want to know the serial number range (i.e., 1234xx) and the markings on the bolt, operating rod, barrel, and side of trigger group housing to know if they are USGI parts.

If you post the markings here, we can decode for you.



Aside from the number on the receiver, you have to disassemble the rifle to get those numbers right? I will have to read up on how to do that. I have never even field stripped it yet. But the serial number on the receiever is 1498xx. Could it even still have been made with USGI parts, having been made around 2002-2003? I bought it in April of 2003.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 7:32:50 AM EDT
Are you a Garand collector? Are the 2 Garand that you are anticipating of purchasing have collector's significance or something special, like a M1D etc? Personally, I would take a M1A over a Garand simply because the M1A has improvements over the older Garand technology.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 8:35:12 AM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
I have never even field stripped it yet.



Sell it to someone who will shoot it.

If you are opening a museum for unfired rifles then you should pick something odd. Like a model that is being discontinued.

These are not colectors items. Get two Garands instead. Better to not fire something that will no longer be produced.

The real mistake is not shooting it.


JR
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 9:16:52 AM EDT
I did not intend to not shoot it when I bought it. I just got out of the Marine Corps and wanted to collect some of the weapons of the military. I just never got around to shooting it because my attention was drawn away from the rifle, due to changing careers and not being able to decide what ammo to stock up on. I also bought a Socom 16 this past year and have the shot the hell out of that. but I have only cleaned it while assembled. Bore snake and a whole lot of q-tips.

Maybe I would be better off selling one of the bushmasters. I bought one of those M4geries, and I have not had the opportunity to shoot it either, because the only range in the area that has rifle shooting is closing down by the time I get off work. And the weekends have been catch up time lately.

I will try to post those parts numbers later today.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 9:50:18 AM EDT
Never field stripped it in three years?

... & you have shot the "HELL" out of a Socom and never field stripped it? I don't want to buy your weapons, unless it is a HELL of a deal. You might want to change that tune to "lovingly handled and cared for, cleaned and inspected thoroughly after each range session". Just me, but, I wouldn't want a weapon that *might* be a problem child without having a gunsmith check it out first.

Ok, Field Stripping: it is real technical. You screen name makes you sound like a helicopter wrench man (except from the never inspecting part), so here goes:

1) Clear the weapon of mags and ammo, leave the hammer cocked, bolt forward
2) Pull the rear of the trigger guard down, then forward like a lever action
3) Remove the trigger housing by pulling downward, may take some rocking action, but don't break anything!
4) Lift the rear of the upper receiver from the stock, taking notice that the front band is around the stock and slide slightly forward.

Easy as pie. mmm, pie...

You should be able to read the manufactures of the barrel and op rod.

In case I am too big of a doofus, here are the directions from FM 23-8, M14 Rifle



7. Disassembly Into Three Main Groups.

a. The three main groups are the firing mechanism,
the barrel and receiver, and the stock.

b. After the rifle is cleared, the bolt
should be forward for disassembling. To do this,
pull back on the operating rod handle and allow
the bolt to go forward.

c. To remove the firing mechanism, grasp the
rear of the trigger guard with the thumb and forefinger
of your right hand and pull downward and
outward until the mechanism is released.
Lift out the firing mechanism, by pulling it away from the stock.

d. To seperate the barrel and receiver from the
stock, lay the weapon on a flat surface with the
sights up and muzzle to the left. Grasp the receiver
with the left hand over the rear sight and
raise the rifle a few inches. With the right hand,
strike down on and grasp the small of the stock,
seperating the barrel and receiver from the stock.



Cheers bro,

~Will
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 9:53:54 AM EDT
Bolt markings are easily visible on the top.

Operating Rod markings are only visible if you remove the rifle from the stock.

Barrel markings may be visible if you retract the oprod, otherwise remove rifle from the stock.

Trigger group markings are only visible if you remove the trigger group from the stock.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 9:57:41 AM EDT
yes.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 4:11:32 PM EDT
These are the numbers I came up with

Receiver 1498xx
Trigger group housing 7267030-I
Operating rod 7267064-2 SA
Bolt 7790186-SA F00072
Barrel HR779190 10-62 AH
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 4:27:21 PM EDT

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
These are the numbers I came up with

Receiver 1498xx
Trigger group housing 7267030-I
Operating rod 7267064-2 SA
Bolt 7790186-SA F00072
Barrel HR779190 10-62 AH



You have a commercial Springfield Armory Inc forged bolt, a USGI Harrington and RIchardson chrome-lined barrel, and what I think are commercial Springfield Armory Inc oprod and trigger group.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 6:10:02 PM EDT
Yes, the rifle has a commercial operating rod and a commercial trigger group housing.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 7:38:19 PM EDT
FWIW, I have never been happy after I had to sell a gun to pay for something (anything!) else. I have sold "duplicates" and been O.K., guns that I did not like, no problem, one or two I could not hit the side of a barn with if I was inside the barn (yes those were operator error ) but for CASH!!! Forget it! Get a second job, sell plasma, whatever it takes! IMHO, it will bug you forever wondering if you did the right thing.
Link Posted: 3/6/2006 8:25:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/6/2006 8:30:36 PM EDT by Achilles1]

Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
These are the numbers I came up with

Receiver 1498xx
Trigger group housing 7267030-I
Operating rod 7267064-2 SA
Bolt 7790186-SA F00072
Barrel HR779190 10-62 AH



These are basically the same parts I have on my M1A with just a 63 H&R barrel were yours is a 62 and it's an excellent, reliable and accurate rifle. I've had all the National Match tuning done to it to make it more accurate and changed the smaller parts out to select pieces like Sadlak's and Smith's, but the major parts listed are the same, all SA except for the barrel.

Unless you have no concern for how it shoots, the platform difference in stock choices and refinement of design from the Garand, the higher fire rate with removable magazines and just collect... or want to.... or like the Garands better....to sell this M1A for two CMP Garand's is a bad choice. If you would just rather have the Garands regardless, than I guess someone else will be getting a fine M1A , you'll still pay the back bill and have two fine Garands.hinking.gif

I'd wouldn't sell mine for any other rifle out there and if I could never buy or have another, I'd be happy still.
Link Posted: 3/7/2006 12:44:41 AM EDT
Well, I got to thinking about it. I do have an extra G38. It is still sealed in the box, and even though it might be difficult selling it for what I paid, I think I might let that go. I think I would be better off selling one of the Bushmaster's also, instead of the M1A.
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