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Posted: 3/1/2006 6:53:16 PM EDT
I have a carbine that I thought was an underwood cause it has an underwood barrel that says 43 on it, but I just got it back from the smith after some work on it and he told me it's on a national postal meter receiver. Does that mean the rifle was built from excess parts post ww2 or could it be a genuine issue? Rifle is in excellent condition and has been in either my or my father's possession since the 60s or 50s. Not looking to sell just curious. Thanks.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 7:48:40 AM EDT
I have a National Postal Meter as well with an Underwood barrel.

NPM didnt make their own barrels and used various makers barrels.

So its probably the original barrel on the gun.

Link Posted: 3/2/2006 12:59:44 PM EDT
NPM made approx 413K carbines or about 6.5% of total production. I wouldn't say it's rare but is uncommon. BBL is most likely original but I would guess rifle has been through a post-WW2 update with bayo lug and adjustable sight added. If not, that only adds value.
Link Posted: 3/2/2006 3:21:15 PM EDT
It came with a circular sight that says JAU on the side with a number. The only thing added is the bayo lug that we had put on, the original leather sling eventually broke in two and is now replaced with a green one. The barrell says underwood and has the bomb marking and says 7-43.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 11:35:32 AM EDT
There is no such thing as a "correct" Carbine. As a matter of fact, if you found one all matching, I would almost guarantee that someone put it together after they bought it. All of the Carbines, as well as the Garands have been through numerous rearsenals and parts were swapped all the time. The Carbines, in particular, were swapped right from new in many cases because suppliers were providing parts from all over the place to keep up with production. The Garands tended to be "correct" when assembled initially. So, your "Underwood" could really have any barrel on it depending on when and where it was assembled and how many times it went through a rearsenal.

Rome
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 3:03:07 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Cabinetman:
There is no such thing as a "correct" Carbine. As a matter of fact, if you found one all matching, I would almost guarantee that someone put it together after they bought it. All of the Carbines, as well as the Garands have been through numerous rearsenals and parts were swapped all the time. The Carbines, in particular, were swapped right from new in many cases because suppliers were providing parts from all over the place to keep up with production. The Garands tended to be "correct" when assembled initially. So, your "Underwood" could really have any barrel on it depending on when and where it was assembled and how many times it went through a rearsenal.

Rome



+1. Restoring carbines to "original" configuration has been a real mania in recent years. Hence the high price of carbine parts. Many carbines were mixmasters coming from the factory. Twelve (or eleven?) major contractors. Hundreds of subcontractors. Six million carbines in something like three years. Then the whole post war rebuild.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 4:00:16 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Ameshawki:

Originally Posted By Cabinetman:
There is no such thing as a "correct" Carbine. As a matter of fact, if you found one all matching, I would almost guarantee that someone put it together after they bought it. All of the Carbines, as well as the Garands have been through numerous rearsenals and parts were swapped all the time. The Carbines, in particular, were swapped right from new in many cases because suppliers were providing parts from all over the place to keep up with production. The Garands tended to be "correct" when assembled initially. So, your "Underwood" could really have any barrel on it depending on when and where it was assembled and how many times it went through a rearsenal.

Rome



+1. Restoring carbines to "original" configuration has been a real mania in recent years. Hence the high price of carbine parts. Many carbines were mixmasters coming from the factory. Twelve (or eleven?) major contractors. Hundreds of subcontractors. Six million carbines in something like three years. Then the whole post war rebuild.



I'm gonna hafta disagree. Not necessarily with what you're saying, but how you're saying it. Carbine parts were not "swapped right from new". Parts were not taken off carbines at one factory and sent to another factory. New, unused parts were sent from one factory to another as needed. Of the 10 prime contractors, none made all the compenent parts of the carbine. So there was HUGE effort on both their part, and that of the some 1500 sub-contractors to get all the parts in the right place at the right time. So, calling a carbine a "mixmaster" from the factory is a misnomer. Really the only way to determine is one is a mixmaster is to look at the individual parts and check the variation vs the reciever date. Even then there is room for error unless it has obvious post-war parts. There's no telling how many original carbines have been "restored" to "correct". Because of the rampant faking, I won't collect "original" or "correct" carbines. Except for 1, all I have are DCM/CMP guns and none of those are from outside sources. I helped unpack them all from the shipping boxes. I know the parts are 100% real and the carbines are 100% USGI.

Link Posted: 3/3/2006 4:06:23 PM EDT

Originally Posted By dermofo:
It came with a circular sight that says JAU on the side with a number. The only thing added is the bayo lug that we had put on, the original leather sling eventually broke in two and is now replaced with a green one. The barrell says underwood and has the bomb marking and says 7-43.



The sight probably says JAO 7160060. Original carbine slings are canvas. Your leather one was an aftermarket add. I'd bet the reciever serial # is right around 1.5 mil?
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 4:27:12 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/3/2006 4:43:37 PM EDT by dermofo]
yup JAO 7160060 and serial starts with 1523. You really know your carbines

BTW is that westie in your photo? I've got two and my family has always had a pair.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 6:27:24 PM EDT
Your carbine fits into the first block of NPM carbines. They were serialed from 1,450,000- 1,549,999 and made between Jan. and Sept. 1943. The July 43 Underwood bbl fits right into that block.


Yeah, that's my stinker. He turns 4 next month. He and my Siamese cat are "mortal enemies". The cat beats him like a drum.
Link Posted: 3/3/2006 7:19:22 PM EDT
Wow, thanks for all the info. Good to know it's an original. (never really doubted it but never verified it either.) I know what you mean with the westies and cats. We have two cats and they never get tired of chasing each other.
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