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Posted: 1/10/2006 6:25:18 PM EDT
Hello, all.

After 2 wks, I will travel to CMP north store to get a M1. I don't know anything about it.
I'm not into collecting stuff, so I specially want a shooter's M1. However it doesn't hurt to pick up a more clean & nice rifle. I can afford up to correct grade one.

I just want to shoot (per AR15 experience, I would shoot about 800 rounds per year) and specially want one for a project gun. You know, I will definitely change barreal & stock at least.
Per CMP's description, they grade M1's mainly based on barrel condition? Stock condition isn't impoartand and I want rifle's mechanical components' integrity so that I only have to change the barrel.
So besides metal finish & stock condition, are barrel conditions the only factor deciding the M1 grading?
What grade one would you recommend as a project rifle?

From CMP's forum, Someone mentioned there are field grades used in Korean war. Would there be better grade ones that were from Korean war time? I want one used in Korean war since my grandfather was KIA during the war.


Comments are welcomed!

Thanks,

Matt.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:11:13 PM EDT
I'm jealous For me to get to CMP I would have to fly.
Since you are going and based on your plans to work on the rifle. Start looking at the rack grades and work your way up to collector. You may find a gem to work with that does not cost that much. Since you say you will be shooting it a lot(well more than what I would get a chance to do) I would get a rack grade and up grade from there.
Me, I'll be ordering a field grade when my GCA membership is processed.

If you find a gem don't do Like i did 10 years ago. Received a tanker free that was 99 percent condition and traded it for a custom 1200 dollar rifle. I kick myself today.

When you shoot it, shoot a clip for me.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 7:13:21 PM EDT
Matt,

I started going nuts at the CMP North Store about a year ago - since then I have purchased 5 Garands. The first one was a SA service grade PeeWee helped me pick out, then 2 Danish Field/GI grade guns, and my last trip saw 2 greek Field/GI grade guns follow me home.

Like you - I am only interested in shooting these guns, so when I get to the store I borrow the gauges and check the ME of all the cheap guns. I've found that the Rack Grade guns are usually dogs with excessive ME, so the next step up are the Field/GI grade guns. I can usually find ones wih MEs of 2 or less, and when I have a couple I then check the TE to find guns with 3 or less.

If I happen to find a few in this manner (not all the time), I then look for good wood and finish on metal. Most of these guns will be mix masters which means they are arsenal rebuilds from all sorts of parts manufacturers - including Beretta and other foreign companies on the Greek & Danish guns.

If they there are no decent Field/GI grade guns, you will have to move up to the Service Grades. You should not have any problem finding a good shooter in this grade, you may even find a gun with some collectability. My first gun appears to be an all original SA gun from August 1945.

All 5 garands I bought shoot great, but I did have to replece the Op Spring on 3 of them because they were broken when I bought the gun (actually, one was pinched and 2 had broken coils inside the bottom of the Op rod).

If in doubt ask PeeWee or George for some help. They are both great guys that work in the store. Make sure you pick up PLENTY of surplus ammo too, as this guns can be adictive.

I should also note that the CMP has recently raised prices - rumor is they have about 50,000 Garands left, and since they sell 15,000/year, I wouldn't wait too long to buy one.

I know I will be back for a few more....

NOTE: You my notice I call one grade GI/Field grade. That's because I don't remember which one I bought. I think CMP may actually have or had both grades and I can't remember what the GI grade guns meant.

ME = Muzzle Erosion
TE = Throat Erosion
I believe ME is more important for accuracy.
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