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Posted: 1/30/2002 4:10:15 PM EDT
I would like to buy one and wanted to see what you guys think about the pros and cons of each gun. Thanks.
Link Posted: 1/30/2002 6:22:20 PM EDT
I've heard that the Titanium is way too light and kicks too much. May want to go with the Airweight.
Link Posted: 1/30/2002 6:27:58 PM EDT
I think that Titanium is the way to go. Titanium is going to be stronger than the Alloy used on an Airweight, and it will reduce the amount of frame stretching and end shake.

I take it that this gun will be used for CCW purposes..so you won't really be shooting it that much.
Link Posted: 1/30/2002 7:58:23 PM EDT

I have a hammerless 342 Titanium. Weighs 10.8 onces. Stings when shooting, especially with +P ammo. Accuracy sucks beyond about 15 feet where bullet drop becomes incredible.

Link Posted: 1/30/2002 10:42:45 PM EDT
I met a S&W rep and he says the titanium frame is much stronger than the equivalent aluminum frame. I shot a 347 Mag 640 of the Scandium frame. Recoil was fairly sharp, but manageable. The big difference of the titanium vs aluminum frames is the price. The Ti version cost about $200 more.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 1:53:07 AM EDT
Actually, my understanding is that with the S&W’s, only the cylinder is titanium. The barrel sleeve is stainless steel, and the remaining large parts are aluminum (excepting the grips, of course). However, perhaps things have changed.

Anyway, the recoil is fierce with +P ammo. The gun flips so badly in my hand that the inside of the triggerguard wacks my trigger finger each time I fire a round. A larger set of grips would help with this, but that defeats the purpose of the gun.

It’s also hard to shoot accurately, though I don’t know if that’s the gun or me.

On the other hand it is a joy to carry, extremely reliable, reasonably powerful and easy to conceal. And lets face it, you’re going to carry it a lot more than shoot it.

My biggest complaint is the cost. I think they are way overpriced. The airlight is very nearly the same gun for a lot less money.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 5:40:36 AM EDT
I've had a nickel 442 for 10 years and recently shot a friends titanium. He can keep it. It's way cool but the bottom line for me was I carry it and rarely shoot the J frame. I don't even like +p's in it. For what I do with it it's not necessary to use +p's and I have no desire to use .357's in a lightweight J frame. I'm partial to Federal Nyclads.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 5:41:24 AM EDT
I've had a nickel 442 for 10 years and recently shot a friends titanium. He can keep it. It's way cool but the bottom line for me was I carry it and rarely shoot the J frame. I don't even like +p's in it. For what I do with it it's not necessary to use +p's and I have no desire to use .357's in a lightweight J frame. I'm partial to Federal Nyclads.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 6:01:39 AM EDT
Titanium makes the gun too light, nasty recoil.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 6:33:17 AM EDT
Thanks for all your help guys!
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 6:45:31 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 199:
Actually, my understanding is that with the S&W’s, only the cylinder is titanium. The barrel sleeve is stainless steel, and the remaining large parts are aluminum (excepting the grips, of course). However, perhaps things have changed.


Oops I'm wrong, I consulted an S&W brochure and the Ti J-frame revolvers the cylinders are titanium, the rest of it is aluminum. I got the Scandium-framed and titanium mixed up. Sorry folks.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 6:57:50 AM EDT
I have one of each and they both hurt when I shoot them and there is not much difference in either. As far as carrying them...I think lighter is better so the Titanium is winning out over the airweight (which was great to carry). Not a range gun. But a great defense gun since you are more likely to have it on you when you need it.

I might be willing to sell my Airwieght body guard if you decide to go that way.

Link Posted: 1/31/2002 6:59:53 AM EDT
I carry a 642 and I have shot the titanium version. The TI gun is way to light. Kicks too much with regular 38 spec for me. Your trigger finger bangs against the trigger guard from the recoil everytime you pull the trigger.

Also, why pay an extra $200 to save 2 oz in weight ? Thats ridiculas to me.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 7:14:17 AM EDT
Frankly, I would carry neither of them.

The best reason in the world for carrying one of these small guns is the .357 Mag 125 grain JHP loads. Why carry a gun this size and carry anything less than the best stopping ammo?

A stainless Model 60 .357 2" barrel, LOADED weighs less than 25 ounces. This is not heavy, and delivers real stopping power.

I do have a titanium revolver, the Taurus 450T, and it delivers essentially the same power level and weighs within a fraction of an ounce of the model 60.

The downside is finding decent ammo in .45 Colt, and the gun is a bit bulkier (cylinder sized like an S&W 686, and the big Ribber grip). The upside is that the muzzle blast is much reduced, muzzle flip is reduced, and the grip is MUCH more comfortable.

Lets face it, if you want 500 ft-lbs. of energy (and you should) than a 25 ounce gun is just about right, light enough to carry, heavy enough to shoot.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 7:23:21 AM EDT
I have the 642 & the Bodyguard in Airweights. These are a great anytime carry gun. You would be hard pressed to not be able to conceal them.
I thought about getting the Titanium, but decided against due to the money. Philadelphia said it best. The recoil issue is a non issue. You will not use this gun as a plinker, so end shake, etc. is irrelevant.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 7:37:01 AM EDT
Another thing to consider is how you will be carrying the revolver. If you are using a Belt Holster like a Small of the Back (SOB) holster, then the weight of the revolver isn't much of an issue since the weight will be riding on your hips. As long as you keep your belt cinched tight, you won't get any sag or movement.

However if you are carrying it in a shoulder holster or ankle holster; then weight is definately an issue.

For example: I have a Ruger SP101. It is a heavy 5 shot 357 DAO and it is just fine as long as I am using my SOB holster. I also have a SW Airweight, that while not as robust or as controllable as the Ruger it is quite a bit lighter and it is fine in a shoulder holster.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 8:11:14 AM EDT
S&W has a lifetime guarantee on their guns, so you folks are a masochists and want "carpool" tunnel that is the gun to plink with at the range.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 9:32:32 AM EDT
I traded my 442 airweight for a 342 Ti. It was a mistake. The 342 has an aluminum frame and Ti cylinder. The 442 has an aluminum frame and steel cylinder. The 342 is really easy to carry, but more difficult to shoot well. Plus the 342 costs way too much. Go with the 442. It is a good solid gun if you want a light 38. Watch-Six
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 9:49:25 AM EDT
Shoot both before you decide. I wanted a titanium until I actually shot one.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 10:21:41 AM EDT
I bought a 337 TI last year. 10.8 oz unloaded. I swapped out the rubber grips for smooth wood. It is not a gun you want shoot all day, but it will put five rounds center of mass at 21'...I drop it in my leather jacket pocket, and forget it. Having said that I mostly carry a G-19, 16 rounds of 9mm, good enough for me, and carries well. BTW, I shoot .38 Federal HP (not +P) in my TI,I find better shot placement and fast recovery. I would go for a hammerless in black. At the time I bought it it cost me around $525 with rebate...I noticed 'TI' prices are up. Good luck.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 10:46:03 AM EDT
Here's what I got, its neither an airweight, nor is it titanium, just old fashioned stainless. This is a S&W 640, 5 shot 357 mag. Its non snag (enclosed hammer), you can actually hit what you are shooting at, and 110 grain 357 loads are reasonably comfortable in this revoler.



Link Posted: 1/31/2002 11:21:47 AM EDT
My favorite configuration is with a hip grip so you tuck it in your belt and don't have to worry about a holster. Holsters will work for a heavy .357 snubby cannon. But I think some of the .357 power is lost to the 3 ft. long blinding ball of fire that comes out the snubby barrel of these guns. I think that would be tough to shoot in the dark.

I also have a grip extender on the front of the grip to make it bigger without having bulk. I forget who makes these. My hand is big and the grip thing makes it nicer to shoot. Nicer as in it only hurts really bad after about 6 shots. It is not a range gun by any means.

Still the titanium snubby is accurate for close in protection. And you won't notice the pain while saving your life.

But I love the hip grip with this gun. You can use it with any pair of pants or belt and you don't really know the gun is there.

I love that 2 oz. lighter and definitely think that it is worth a couple extra bucks for 20-30 years ($10/year) of more comfort and less sagging waistbands.

I love Milt Sparks holsters but I never carried the .357 SP101 muchm, because it is too heavy and a pain in the ass to put on for my occasional carry needs.

I think that is probably more than my 2 cents worth.


Link Posted: 1/31/2002 12:07:56 PM EDT
thanks for the info! I decided to get the 642.
The reasons are:

1) I was not to concerned with the recoil but my wife is going to carry it most of the time in a fanny pack and I was concerned that if the recoil was violent enough she might be to startled to give an effective follow up shot if needed or even worse drop it!

2) The cost. I got the 642 for $400 and the Ti was $560. Thats alot of cash for 2 oz.
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 12:13:22 PM EDT
For your wife you might consider using this Nyclad 38 Special ammo.

www.federalcartridge.com/andex2.html
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 1:14:28 PM EDT
get the airweight not the titanium i shot a titanuim in 32 hr and it hurt like hell from a 32!! a normally mild gun
Link Posted: 1/31/2002 1:50:49 PM EDT
ECS,

Thats exactly what I did! Nyclads seemed perfect for her.
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