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Posted: 1/27/2002 7:36:36 AM EDT
i have looked on this web site for some help properly lubricating my ar-15 but can't find any.

so what i do is hose the bolt with wd-40 and that seems to get the job done but is there a better, less messy way to oil it?
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 8:07:31 AM EDT
WD40 is not an oil, it is supposed to be used to repel water. I and many other use BreakFree CLP as a lube and cleaner. It should be available at any gunshop.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 8:25:13 AM EDT
I highly recomend your NOT using WD-40...use WD-40 at your own risk!!

Here is a link on AR15.com about your rifle, check the bottom section for maint.
www.ar15.com/articles/article.html?article=54

or, check out the military manual:
www.biggerhammer.net/manuals/
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 8:50:39 AM EDT
Olympic Arms has detailed Cleaning and Lube instructions in their manual at their website.
Good Luck
Frank
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 9:10:55 AM EDT
I've found that Militec-1 works great on AR's. The gun seems to stay much cleaner than with Break-free.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 10:12:02 AM EDT
RemOil and One Shot here. CLP collects dust too quick for me.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 10:50:27 AM EDT

Originally Posted By garheadjr:
RemOil and One Shot here. CLP collects dust too quick for me.



You think there's a difference between RemOil and CLP???
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 1:27:58 PM EDT
CLP! It's all you need.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 5:00:33 PM EDT
CLP but it smells like crap.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 6:24:16 PM EDT

CLP but it smells like crap.


This is true.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 7:37:36 PM EDT
When I firt got my AR, I doused it in CLP, and I got mucho jams. After that, I just left a nice shiny glaze, and it runs like a champ. When the gun smokes more than a chainsaw when you fire it, you're using too much lube.

Color me weird, but I actually like the smell of CLP. But that Outers banana-smelling stuff is better.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 7:47:30 PM EDT
I always thought CLP smelled fine... now Tetra Oil is just plain vile... both bottles I have smell like some sort of funky blue cheese.
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 7:53:01 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/27/2002 8:46:02 PM EDT
For me It is clp In a very ,,very ,,light coat on the bolt. The buffer and its spring get a very heavy grease. The The trigger group gets a molly spray...pat
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 4:02:48 AM EDT
For lubrication I use Militec-1, it did not clean or protect (CLP). For CLP I use Break Free.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 5:34:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Admiral_Crunch:
When the gun smokes more than a chainsaw when you fire it, you're using too much lube.




Truer words were never spoken. I too have gotten carried away and the first couple rounds that do downrange end up with some interesting smoke coming out the ejection port
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 5:51:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ECS:
CLP but it smells like crap.



SO WHAT?!?

I shoot my gun, not sniff it's butt. (stock)
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 7:38:04 AM EDT
CLP is fine if that's all you have, but there are better ways of lubricating the AR-15.

Use a good grease like Tetra on your bolt lugs and other bearing surfaces, such as the bolt carrier. Just a tiny film is best. You can also use the grease on the buffer spring assembly.

CLP or other oil is best used in captive assemblies like the trigger/sear area, detent springs, front sight, etc. A light film of CLP (i.e., apply and wipe off) on all surfaces is a great protectant and works as a residual lubricant.

Putting an oil in the action of an autoloader is a good way to get oil sprayed all over your shooting glasses and clothing, but the rifle won't care.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 8:51:41 AM EDT
Or you get oil sprayed into your eyes when you stupidly shoot without the glasses....

Friend's SKS + cosmoline removing bath - shooting glasses = searing pain.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 9:08:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 308wood:
i have looked on this web site for some help properly lubricating my ar-15 but can't find any.

so what i do is hose the bolt with wd-40 and that seems to get the job done but is there a better, less messy way to oil it?




WD-40 or any other lubricant that boasts the ability to penetrate metal should NEVER be used on ANY firearm. They lubricate OK, but they will also deaden primers and powder, because they can penetrate the casings. Granted, the WD-40 isn't usually on the casing long enough to do this, but why risk it? Since you have to buy SOMETHING, you might as well buy the RIGHT stuff, and that's CLP.

Link Posted: 1/28/2002 9:14:32 AM EDT
Tetra Grease and BreakFree CLP.
Never use a thin, penetrating oil like WD-40. It will disappear with the first couple of shots, leaving you with nothing. Heavier oils are fine for captive areas, but the open areas require a grease to stay put.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 10:01:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SJSAMPLE:Tetra Grease and BreakFree CLP.
Never use a thin, penetrating oil like WD-40. It will disappear with the first couple of shots, leaving you with nothing. Heavier oils are fine for captive areas, but the open areas require a grease to stay put.



For what it's worth, WD-40 mainly a solvent. Dousing the gun with WD-40 is about equal to using kerosene or mineral spirits as a lubricant. It makes a sh!tty protectant too. My dad ruined the blue on a beautiful Browning rifle by using WD-40.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 10:58:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 308wood:
i have looked on this web site for some help properly lubricating my ar-15 but can't find any.



Then you really haven't tried.

If you go here old.ar15.com/books
you can download the -10 (M16A2 Operators Manual) There are complete cleaning & lubricating instructions. CLP (Break Free CLP or Remmington NITRO CLP are two commercial products that meet the spec) it the proper product to use, there is NO METION of grease anywhere in the manual (this is a AR-15 not a Garand).
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 11:26:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:
CLP (Break Free CLP or Remmington NITRO CLP are two commercial products that meet the spec) it the proper product to use, there is NO METION of grease anywhere in the manual (this is a AR-15 not a Garand).



The manual you're referring to was written for the average military rifleman, and has relevant info within the parameters of a military organization. It isn't necessarily the Bible of M-16 maintenance, and there may be better ways of doing things if you're a civilian shooter.

I use grease because I'd like to keep it as well-maintained as possible to maximize its life. After all, I paid for this AR, not the taxpayers. I'm not going to tote my gun into the Artic Circle anytime soon, either.

And if the guys at Fulton Armory also suggest using grease, I don't doubt they have good reasons for doing so.

I used CLP exclusively myself until recently, so I know it works well.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 11:28:29 AM EDT
308wood, obviously you missed this old post:

www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?id=87068
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 12:11:47 PM EDT
I can offer a counterpoint to the WD-40, for what it's worth. My dad has used nothing but WD-40 to clean his guns his entire life. That's how he was taught, and he never thought anything of it. It's all I ever used until I got online and read all these admonitions not to. He has had zero problems. Granted, he has no semi-autos - only bolt-actions and revolvers. As long as you're not dealing with autoloaders, WD-40 can't be all that bad.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 2:39:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2002 2:39:59 PM EDT by Forest]

Originally Posted By ken_mays:
The manual you're referring to was written for the average military rifleman, and has relevant info within the parameters of a military organization. It isn't necessarily the Bible of M-16 maintenance, and there may be better ways of doing things if you're a civilian shooter.


It is a 'bible' for keeping the rifle 100% operational, even under extream conditions. If you want less than reliable then by all means experiment. I'm sure there are people on this board who have spent more time with the rifle than the US Army (NOT!).



I use grease because I'd like to keep it as well-maintained as possible to maximize its life.


And you have research to back up this claim of extended life?



And if the guys at Fulton Armory also suggest using grease, I don't doubt they have good reasons for doing so.


Clint and crew are smart people, but they come from a M1/M14 background. The AR is relatively new for them. With the M1s and M14s you had to use grease.

The Army tried using grease with the M16 when it first came out (I actually have a copy of an old manual indicating use of grease on the bolt locking lugs). Problem is they found out it REDUCED RELIABILITY. Since then there has been no mention of grease in the manuals.

Remember these are guys that are doing testing with more rifles & ammo in a month than you will ever see in your lifetime. Give them the benefit of the doubt.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 3:37:33 PM EDT
I use a spray carb cleaner in the bore to speed up cleaning and CLP everywhere else. CLP just seems to take longer to clean a dirty barrel than a volitile solvent. I found also that grease on the barrel lugs was not a good idea, I used RIG grease on my lugs and after a while it collected enough powder and carbon on it it got pretty gummy and sticky..
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 5:53:48 PM EDT
I use Hoppes to clean the bolt and bolt carrier. I find that the little excess that I dont bother to wipe off provides adiqute lube. I have not had any problems w/ corosion, jaming, or accuracy, so I sitck with that combination.
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 6:19:16 PM EDT
Now Hoppes smells GOOOOOOOD!
Link Posted: 1/28/2002 10:19:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Forest:
It is a 'bible' for keeping the rifle 100% operational, even under extream conditions. If you want less than reliable then by all means experiment. I'm sure there are people on this board who have spent more time with the rifle than the US Army (NOT!).



I'm always experimenting. And for me, it doesn't matter if I have the occasional jam at the range. So, I'll continue to use grease until I find a compelling reason to do otherwise.




And you have research to back up this claim of extended life?


No research, just a common sense perception that lubrication that stays where it is applied ought to work better than lubrication that gets flung off in the first five rounds.



Clint and crew are smart people, but they come from a M1/M14 background. The AR is relatively new for them. With the M1s and M14s you had to use grease.



Maybe so. At any rate, those guys have seen and worked on more AR's than I ever will, so I'll continue to take their advice unless I run into problems. I also believe their advice is more suited to my situation than the Army's.



Remember these are guys that are doing testing with more rifles & ammo in a month than you will ever see in your lifetime. Give them the benefit of the doubt.



I don't doubt that either method works fine, but I enjoy trying new products. I'm somewhat of a lube junkie, to tell the truth.
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