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Posted: 2/22/2006 9:29:36 PM EDT
For a little while now I have been entertaining the thought of getting into some silouette shooting. I am familiar with the Pedersolli and Shiloh Sharps productl lines, but not ready to lay out the cash for a Sharps rifle just yet...would rather dip my toe in the water first.

It seems that the 1895 cowboy would be an excellent means of starting out. Looks like I could get one for about $550, and they can be tapped for tang sights. Will probably stay "traditional" and use black powder loads.

Should the time come for me to go up a level and get a Sharps rifle, it appears the Shiloh is the best way to go. In the meantime however, does anyone have an opinion on the 1895 Cowboy? Comments on fit and finish and accuracy are welcome.

Thanks!

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:20:18 AM EDT
I have a 1895GS.
It is awesome. Very comfortable. Great lines. Great shooter.
A firearms collection is just not complete until you have a gun that can take a Bison.


With 44 mag
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 4:32:37 AM EDT
Get both.

I have a '95 Marlin and a Sharps. The Marlin is light enough to carry hunting and holds a lot of rounds. Good stuff.

The Sharps is much heavier and is a single shot. Most of them like soft and heavy bullets with black powder. Mine would barely hold minute of pie plate at 100 using smokeless factory loads. It didn't like the fake black powder either.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 10:50:42 AM EDT
Ever shoot the Marlin with blackpowder loads? I know it is doable, but I get the impression that it is more intended for smokeless powder and I wonder if it would not "like" the blackpowder much in the same way your Sharps does not "like" smokeless.

What kind of Sharps do you have anyway? Don't be afraid to post pics.


Originally Posted By wildearp:
Get both.

I have a '95 Marlin and a Sharps. The Marlin is light enough to carry hunting and holds a lot of rounds. Good stuff.

The Sharps is much heavier and is a single shot. Most of them like soft and heavy bullets with black powder. Mine would barely hold minute of pie plate at 100 using smokeless factory loads. It didn't like the fake black powder either.

Link Posted: 2/23/2006 1:13:30 PM EDT

Originally Posted By wildearp:


The Sharps is much heavier and is a single shot. Most of them like soft and heavy bullets with black powder. Mine would barely hold minute of pie plate at 100 using smokeless factory loads. It didn't like the fake black powder either.



+1

My Pedersoli Sharps didn't like smokeless at all, but it's quite accurate with 530gr cast lead over 67gr of FFg. I've only put it on paper at 100, but it will do around 1" easy. Had to replace the rear sight it came with... got a nice handmade vernier tang site.

I wouldn't want to shoot full power loads or heavy loads out of a levergun... part of what makes the Sharps so pleasant to shoot is that it is heavy.... almost 13lb... it has the mass to absorb recoil. Heck, I shoot it without any sort of padding, and can't complain.
Link Posted: 2/23/2006 1:20:53 PM EDT
I dont know about 45-70, but I do have one in 45LC to go with my Peacemaker. Its really accurate. Was hitting Chicken Sils at 135 yards all day long, with just the factory sights, but I dont know how well it would do at 500 yds.

I would suggest a carbine that shares a bullet with your pistol, and go with a Sharps, Ballard, Highwall ect for a real long range gun. Look for a used Import to start out just to make sure you like the gig, and save for that S Sharps or Ballard that will take 3-4 years to get anyway LOL

Another thing to think about, I know at the matches Ive shot, lever guns are not allowed.



Link Posted: 2/23/2006 1:21:21 PM EDT
The lever gun while an excellent choice for hunting and general shooting is not what you want to shoot silhouettes.

The NRA Mid and long range silhouettes have to be shot with a single shot, falling block type exposed hammer. In other words a sharps or sharps type.

Ruger number 1 is not allowed for example.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 8:05:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/24/2006 8:10:41 AM EDT by Beerswimmer]
I own an 1895CB. For me it the just the way it felt. I handled all of the models and the CB just felt better. It didn't feel any heavier, just more balanced. It holds 9+1. It has a longer barrel to get a few more fps out of the slow, heavies. Shoots cloverleafs at 100yards with almost all of the ammo I have put through it. Never tried farther, it's a hunter for close encounters with hogzillas. I took off the front sight and mounted a Zeiss Conquest on it. Amazing rifle. You will NOT be dissapointed in it as a hunter. As far as silouette shooting, it might not be perfect.

Edited to add: check out marlinowners.com for all there is to know about Marlin rilfes and loadings for them.
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 1:47:32 PM EDT
We've got a Marlin Guide Gun. Awesome firearm. Firing that thing is almost as good as sex!
Link Posted: 2/24/2006 1:55:03 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sharpknife:
The lever gun while an excellent choice for hunting and general shooting is not what you want to shoot silhouettes.





+1

I had a Pedersoli 45-70 once, wish I still had it. Double triggers, the whole bit. Not to say the Marlin isn't a good gun, on the contrary, I rate them very highly. Different guns, different purposes in design intent.


My .o2


Link Posted: 2/26/2006 1:10:56 PM EDT
There is also an 1886 Winchester out there. They are new, licensed and made in Japan. I have one in 45-90, it runs 45-70 just fine. Well worth checking out.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 4:14:05 PM EDT
I have one as well in 45-70. My wife bought it for me as a anniversary gift about 5 years ago. It's a heavy,accruate rifle. Full length mag, octogon barrel, cresent buttplate, Very strong action. I've never shot black powder loads through it, I've gotten very good results with 405gr cast lead slugs. Unlike a Sharps this action dosen't strip down easily, which is primarily why I stuck to smokeless loads, easier cleanup.
Link Posted: 2/26/2006 7:12:48 PM EDT
I was at a gun store once and saw a custom made 45-70 revolver. It weighed about 5 pounds or so and the cylinder weighed 2 pounds.
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