Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Posted: 1/16/2006 3:38:06 PM EDT
My Dad left me several guns when he died, two years ago this month. I still think of him everyday. I hope he realised, that he was my hero, I didn't, until he was gone, at 64, I still called him, out of habit, and to listen to his phone message, for about a month after his death...Excuse me.... I was starting to think to much...Anyway, he had a Browning light 12 Belgium made, don't know the year. A Winchester 22 pump, the one with the hammer on it, don't know the model. He never let me shoot them as a kid,or even take them out of the closet. I'm 35 now. I carried the Browning pheasent hunting last year, and I am planning to shoot the Winchester soon, I couldn't get past the fact, that I wasn't supposed to use them. He left me several more, but I always had permission to shoot them. Anyone have similar thoughts or stories, and what type of gun?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:07:00 PM EDT
I have indirectly inherited a few guns; my Dad is still alive & he's not into guns so my version is a lot different than yours.

As for shooting them, if they've been shot before, hell yes I'd shoot them. Guns are made to be appreciated & the best way to do that is by shooting them, IMO.

Unless a gun is a commerative model costing $2k or so, I'd shoot it & not think twice about it.

My .o2
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:11:52 PM EDT
The only one I have right now is a Browning Sweet 16 that my mom bought for my grandfather in 1959. He died in 1982 and I got the gun. It's been in my safe ever since. Every year I say I am going to take it out and shoot it but still haven't. I have a lot of old paper hull shells that I got with it.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:13:34 PM EDT
Yes. I was given a Browning Sweet Sixteen shotgun from my grandfather-inlaw estate. They gave it to me because they knew I would appreciate it and not just throw it in a closet. To this day I think of him and his stories every time I pull it out. I enjoy shooting it very much.

One of the things that really gets me is that he used to goose hunt with it, yup, a 16 gauge goose gun. His hunting ground was a small lake that is now a city park. I can just imagine what would happen if someone showed up there now with a shotgun. (For you St. Louis, mo. residents I am talking about Creve Couer Park)
Times sure have changed.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:17:22 PM EDT
Yeah, a 1957 Browning Auto-5 12 ga. It was my step-father's until he was killed in '77. Shot to death in a bar, oddly enough. I've had it ever since. I used to use it for dove and quail, but I never hunt anymore. I'm actually thinking of selling it, since it really has no sentimental value to me.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:20:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 5:22:57 PM EDT by sta1treeman]
I agree, Dad didn't want me shooting the Browning or the Winchester when I was a kid, because he knew I didn't appreciate them, and was afraid I would tear them up or lose them. Now that I am an adult, and the guns are mine, I am sure he would have no problem with me shooting them. He knew as an adult, I am responsible, and would take care of them, I just never ask to use them when he was alive, I had my on. I might bird hunt from time to time, with the Browning, and plink with the Winchester, but they will spend most of their time in the safe, I don't want to risk damaging them. I will give them the respect, and care he did.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:27:58 PM EDT
Guns were made to be shot. I have a .22 my grandpa gave me and I shoot it all the time.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:37:11 PM EDT
I inherited more than just the two mentioned above, a 22 revolver-old weastern looking, but not that old, love to shoot it. 38 S&W rev. shoot it fairly often. 22 remington semi-rifle, one squirrel killing machine. H&R single shot 22, fun, and a good squirrel gun also. Ruger mark?(luger style) it and the 22 rifles were my Grandads, I have been shooting them since I could hold them. Only the Browning 12, and Winchester 22 pump were off limits.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:49:37 PM EDT
My wife's Grandfather passed away about 2 yrs ago and her Grandmother gave me his only 2 guns. I am sorry to say that neither were/are in working condition. One is a side-by-side 12 ga w/ dbl triggers that I have never heard of before. I think it is made by "Occidental" and the model is "The Interchangeable". I believe that it may have been made in Belgium. The other is a
Winchester .22, single shot bolt action. I removed the bolt and found there to be no parts inside of it. Nevertheless, they are still appreciated and adorn the mantle.

My Grandfather has told me that he is going to will his M1 Carbine to me. He recently told me that he was just going to go ahead and give it to me the next time that we are to see each other. The caviat is that I can not sell it. Not that I would anyhow. I think that it was made by Swinger or Singer or something like that. Probably not worth much except to maybe me. Actually, I think it is an IBM.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 5:49:58 PM EDT
My best friend died recently of cancer and left me a Colt 38 "Agent" and a model 29 44 mag s&W. I think he would have wanted me to shoot them but I probably never will. I will certainly never part with them. I can still remember the first time he pulled out that big 'ole 44 and how proud he was of it............ r.i.p. "Gary"
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:44:24 PM EDT
I have the gun of a deceased friend and co-worker...

He let me use it in an IPSC match before he died...

I bought it from his family and shoot it all the time...



If you're wondering it's a Benelli M1.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 6:58:26 PM EDT
You made me remember, I got a 20 gauge side by side H&R, from my grandad, the old uncle Jessie gun, I've killed many a robin, and rabbit with it, the firing pins still work, but they fall forward when the gun is open, you have to push them back in before you close the breach. How do you guys feel about having an old gun such as this reworked, and reblued?I'm afraid of the loss of character, but you would gain function?
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:00:11 PM EDT
I took my great grandpa's Stevens single shot .410 out squirrel hunting today.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:11:50 PM EDT
I have guns that belonged to both my father and father-in-law. They all get used. Just very carefully. I even still have the first gun that was really mine. A Stevens single-shot .410 that became mine when I could reach up over the back door and take it down unassisted. Had to stand on my tiptoes to do it but I finally succeeded.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:12:29 PM EDT
I have my Dad's Colt Python
S&W .357
Colt 1911 service pistol from WWII and Korea
Browning A-5 in 12 and 20GA
2 Weatherby O/U in 12 and 20 GA
300 Weatherby Magnum
7MM magnum
3 .22's-One Weatherby he gave me.

All were my Dad's. He died in August and I shoot them all every chance I get. I care for each of them well to honor his memory and I think about my Dad every time I use them. His service pistol is my favorite and it may not be worth much to anyone else but it's priceless to me.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:13:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 7:16:03 PM EDT by cornholio123]
sorry about the dupe
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 7:14:43 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 7:15:29 PM EDT by cornholio123]
oops my wireless freaked out
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:00:36 PM EDT
Aw, sometimes I carry my grand-dad's pistol IWB.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 8:55:40 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/16/2006 10:00:45 PM EDT by sta1treeman]
I've enjoyed reading everyones posts, growing up, holding guns, and going shooting and hunting were the #1 things I wanted to do. I would stay with my Grand parents on the weekends, they only lived about 2 miles from our house, there were woods and slate dumps all around, and my Grandad was an avid hunter, and fisherman, all around outdoorsman. He had pics of deer he had killed that would score huge on boone and crocket, but he didn't care about stuff like that, he never had a deer mounted, I would give anything to have the racks he had just laying in his old garage. Going shooting with him and my Dad, was all I wanted to do, I would keep the spent shotgun shells just to smell them, if we weren't shooting I was reading his copies of Outdoor life, or playing with all the shells in his ammo box. I remember him letting me prop his scoped 22, ( I thought it was a big game gun) on his shoulder, because I was to little to hold it up, maybe 4 or 5. And the first time he let me shoot his 20 gauge shotgun,I was 5 or 6, I was scared to death, I knew I was going to get kicked to the ground! He kept telling me, I shook like I had the palsy, I didn't know what that was, but I knew I didn't want it. He was a retired coal miner, and the best marksman I ever knew, he told me, when he was a kid, he had a single shot 22, and his dad would give him one bullet, if he didn't hit it, they didn't eat. He said, he would go to local ponds and shoot turtles in the nose, they would crawl on the bank, and bleed to death, and you didn't mess the meat up. The last time we went hunting, I was 14 or so, he was around 80, he was shooting a scoped 22 Remington ( the big game gun) he head shot 6 squirrels while sitting under a tree. I never ask to go shooting that he didn't carry me.Grandmother would always pack a killer lunch, puddin' packs and all! His guns and my Dads have no price tag, they have more memories in them, than bullets fired through them... OH! the good old days, what awesome memories! I still smell spent rounds, and fondly think of them both, it's one of the reasons I love to shoot so much now, I would love to be able to hear them say nice shot boy! just one more time.....I will turn 36 next month, I have ARs, an AK, Steyr 300mag, several handguns, both high dollar and cheap, OUs, pumps, and Automatics, fine optics, and a member of a range, hell I've even got a computer to talk about guns with you guys. I would trade it all, for one afternoon, shooting cans or just the shit, with Dad and Grandad, the best two men I ever Knew..............Edit for you younger guys, not that I am old and wise, far from either, but cherish every moment you have with your Grandparents, and parents alike, never miss a chance to go shooting, shopping, or just plain talking to them, you will learn more than you can realise or appreciate until your older, these times are so special, and with the speed of life, the opportunity to have them will be gone in a blink of an eye. and to you parents, take your kids to the range, and if the range doesn't allow children find somwhere else to go, you will be giving them memories, and teaching them lessons they will carry for the rest of their lives, one day, the time they got to spend with you, will be the most valuble time they ever spent. It may take them many years to appreciate it, but you can bet they will.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 10:07:35 PM EDT
How do you guys feel about having an old inherited gun restored? reblueing etc.. I have a couple I would consider, and a few that have looked worn as long as I've known them, I don't think I would change those at all.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 7:42:45 AM EDT
Other than doing it yourself, what is a good co., to do a restore?refinish on an old firearm?
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 10:14:52 AM EDT
I have several shotguns that were my father-in-laws. We did a lot of pheasant hunting together in the years before he passed away. I take them out and hunt with them, brings back great memories.

Although my father is still alive I have two pistols he brought back from Europe and WWII. One is a Radom P-35, the other a French Unique .32. I've taken them both out and shot them. One of my brothers has a Luger he brought back, another brother has an Astra.

I wish that I had some of the other weapons he brought back. When he came home from Italy, after the end of the war, he shipped a bunch of things home to Hawaii in a duffle bag. It was not locked and still made it all the way home intact.

Inside were the four pistols mentioned, a 1911, a M1 carbine, a Thompson, a pair of German binocs, and an MP40. He left them at home when he went off to college . His older brother gave away the 1911, sold the Thompson (after shooting it a lot), loaned out the carbine (never returned) and no one remembers what happened to the binoculars. It was a long time before my father was talking to him again. The MP40 stuck around for awhile, but was eventually given to a collector friend of my father.

Man do I wish I still had them all.

I also have an Enfield rifle that my father bought when I was young.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 10:21:04 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/17/2006 10:24:55 AM EDT by _Notch_]
I have three guns that were my parents... One is a 1911a1 that my dad had since he served in WW2 It is in really great shape and is what started my love afair with the .45. I remember looking at it as a kid and thinking that there was little that was as cool as it... Still think so. I shoot it every once in a while cus that is what it was made for... Dont carry it though... Another is a Beretta 94 22 lr that my dad gave my mom back before I was born. Still have the box it came in as well as the original inserts and import tag. That too I shoot every once in a while... The third is a little Raven 25 that my dad owned... stainless with pearl grips... That goes in the pocket every once in a while when there is no other way to go heavy... Better a 25 than nothing! I wouldnt put a price on these guns for anything. I will always cherish them and I'm already working on instilling that feeling for them in my son... Hopefully someday my great great grandkids will hold these and wonder what things they have been through with the people who owned them..... I myself would not refinish a gun that sat in this catagorie... Best kept oiled and lightly exersized IMHO! Its been 9 years since I lost my mom...7 years since I lost my dad... I still catch myself every once in a while thinking..." I should call pop (or mom) and tell him/her about this!" then the realization that that is never going to happen again... no good...
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 10:33:56 AM EDT
I agree, the remington 22 semi, needs a firing pin, and a few minor repairs, it is modern compared to the others my dad and grandad left me. the Browning 12, and ruger 22 pistol look brand new, and function like new. the others, and I love them all, are well worn, and in that wear are scratches, and palm prints( in the wood, not rust) that were made by my Dad and Grandad, that is the entire character of the guns, and I wouldn't dream of having them refinished, it would be like removing them from the guns.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 12:27:50 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sta1treeman:
You made me remember, I got a 20 gauge side by side H&R, from my grandad, the old uncle Jessie gun, I've killed many a robin, and rabbit with it, the firing pins still work, but they fall forward when the gun is open, you have to push them back in before you close the breach. How do you guys feel about having an old gun such as this reworked, and reblued?I'm afraid of the loss of character, but you would gain function?



Reconditioning a firearm of that age could devalue the piece. That was the advice given to me when I looked into doing the same thing with the shotgun mentioned above.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:17:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sta1treeman:

I might bird hunt from time to time, with the Browning, and plink with the Winchester, but they will spend most of their time in the safe, I don't want to risk damaging them.




Shoot skeet, sir. That way they won't be at risk for damage & you can enjoy them!
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 4:19:55 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sta1treeman:

How do you guys feel about having an old gun such as this reworked, and reblued?I'm afraid of the loss of character, but you would gain function?




I've had it done. As long as the gun wasn't worth a lot of $$$, I'd have no hesitation, especially if it makes it safer.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 7:53:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 8:25:23 PM EDT
All good advice, and good stories, I think I will carry the Browning skeet shooting, their is a trap course not to far from my house, I gave my girlfriend an inexpensive O/U when we went pheasent hunting last year, we are going again this year, its going to become our yearly tradition. She deer hunts often with me, and still goes with her dad when I'm at the firestation, shes a shooter mind you, I know she got two pheasents last year, they were definently her kills, no deer this year yet, she is in school to be a nurse anesthatists( edit for spelling), she is a keeper. I would like to have the side by side 20ga. H&R, or it may be an L.C Smith, firing pins fixed, I wouldn,t think this gun has to much dollar value, am I wrong? but it has, priceless sentimental value, would this be a mistake?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 5:35:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 5:38:45 AM EDT by specter_actual]
i have my great grandfathers 22 its a wordswestern field bolt action and no i dont shot it whenyou move the bolt fowerd to close it the firng pin releses with out touvhing the triger
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 10:07:20 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/18/2006 10:30:31 AM EDT by sta1treeman]
Another question on firing older guns, not a historical type firearm, but the old hand me downs, Assuming they are safe to fire, what do you guys think are the chances of doing terminal damage to them? Firing pins and springs can be replaced, I'm talking about kabooms, or damaging the actions. I would think an older firearm, shotgun or rifle, if it hasn't been neglected, would be fine, and metal fatigue wouldn't be a real issue, what are your opinions?
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:21:09 PM EDT
Just dont load them hot... And use yur head ... The will be fine!
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 1:22:38 PM EDT
Without going into unnecessary detail, YES and YES.
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:43:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By cornholio123:

I care for each of them well to honor his memory and I think about my Dad every time I use them. His service pistol is my favorite and it may not be worth much to anyone else but it's priceless to me.





This is what separates firearms from just about everything else, IMO. Well said, sir!
Link Posted: 1/18/2006 4:46:15 PM EDT

Originally Posted By sta1treeman:
Another question on firing older guns, not a historical type firearm, but the old hand me downs, Assuming they are safe to fire, what do you guys think are the chances of doing terminal damage to them?




Use wadcutters in .38spl, target loads or cowboy loads in other calibers. All are very mild loads. Hell, in some of them you can watch the bullet race downrange!
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 8:12:32 AM EDT
It depends on the gun:

I have a M629 Smith I got from my brother shortly before he died and I do shoot it.
I have a Browning Hi-Power with Nazi markings brought back as a war trophy by my
late father-in-law. That gun never gets shot.

However, generally if the gun is a newer, servicable model in good condition I agree that it honors the formers owners memory by firing them.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 11:32:31 AM EDT
My Dad stopped hunting when I was to young to go with him, he had nothing against it, he just turned in to a total fisherman, I still use his rods and reels. His firearms didn't get shot very often, but all are in excellent shape, I would feel safe firing any of them. My Grandad hunted until he wasn't physically able, used the same old guns he had been using for years, and if he were still alive, he would still be using them. Thanks for everone's input, I feel better about shooting them, without risking damage. I may take his dbl s/s 20ga. on a bird hunt, the next time I go, it has killed a lot of Quail and doves in it's lifetime, but I think it was more the man behind the trigger.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 4:05:00 PM EDT
I'd shoot them. Don't baby, but don't be reckless, either. ANd, I'd tip my hat to "the old man" when I did.
Link Posted: 1/19/2006 5:34:45 PM EDT
Always.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 4:21:26 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/20/2006 4:21:55 PM EDT by fla556guy]
Dad's still alive, thank god. But when I inheret his guns, I'll shoot them, well, all of them except the 300 weatherby mag.....I didn't like the recoil while I was spotting for him.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 4:39:54 PM EDT
Yes!

My PawPaw left my Dad and I his guns when he passed away. I am a fairly good wingshot with his old Mossberg Model 500AT (funny, I can't hit crap with any other shotgun I've ever tried).

Must be good mojo or something.

He also left us a Sears pump 12ga., never shot it.
Link Posted: 1/20/2006 6:35:51 PM EDT
Paw Paw may be helping you lead a little more, you never know, sounds like very good mo-jo.
Top Top