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Posted: 1/13/2006 4:38:02 PM EDT
My Dad gave my Grandfathers Model 94 to me for Christmas. It has a lot of family history, most of us through three generations have shot and hunted with this gun. The original bluing has been worn off in areas due to rubbing against the scabbard, and there is some rust just beginning to show up in a couple small patches. It's not really a collectors gun and I want it to be a working gun for my grandchildren to shoot and hunt with. What re-finishing technique would you recommend for this gun that would not detract from it's valve, prevent rust for a very long time and keep it looking nice?

Thanks

JR
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 4:45:14 PM EDT
Probably worth more if you don't mess with it except to stop the rust. Refinishing destroys value.

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By jrosto:
My Dad gave my Grandfathers Model 94 to me for Christmas. It has a lot of family history, most of us through three generations have shot and hunted with this gun. The original bluing has been worn off in areas due to rubbing against the scabbard, and there is some rust just beginning to show up in a couple small patches. It's not really a collectors gun and I want it to be a working gun for my grandchildren to shoot and hunt with. What re-finishing technique would you recommend for this gun that would not detract from it's valve, prevent rust for a very long time and keep it looking nice?

Thanks

JR

Link Posted: 1/13/2006 7:24:43 PM EDT
Clean it, oil it, cherish it.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 7:40:51 PM EDT
Never refinish an heirloom or antique. If you want a new one buy a new one.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 8:20:44 PM EDT
All good advice. See above.
Link Posted: 1/13/2006 9:54:02 PM EDT
I'm on the flip side. I say if you are going to keep it in the family and never sell it then restore it. It will last longer and and others will take better care of it if it looks nice rather then beat up and worn out.

I just had one of the best gun smiths in Colorado refinish our old tired Winchester model 12 that has been in the family sence 1915, a 1957 model 70 Featherweight, and a 1964 Browning Superposed Lightning. All are collector guns worth big bucks. I will never sell them so the $$$ does not matter to me. The only thing that matters is that the guns are now in mint condition ready for another 50-100 years of family use.

If the gun is staying in the family then restore it and care for it.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 2:09:19 AM EDT
Thanks for all the input, I appreciate it.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 2:58:24 AM EDT
If you do deceide to have it restored, seek out a professoinal Winchester restorer.
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 3:27:15 AM EDT
+1 on Cherish it and Clean it
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 5:14:15 AM EDT
I will soon have an Ithaca model 37 skeet, that originally had beautiful wood. Over the years, hard use from my dad and shoddy care from my loser sister and her trucker trash husband have turned it to crap. I plan on having it restored. It was my dad's prized shotgun. He has a 50's era, model 27 S&W that will go back to S&W for refinish as well.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 10:53:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/15/2006 10:56:24 AM EDT by Balming]
Google a guy named "Turnbull". I reccomend against refinishing it, but Turnbull RESTORES them to original down to the case colors, he is a true craftsman.

Edited to add link!

turnbullrestoration.com/restorations.htm


Balming
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 11:45:57 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Balming:
Google a guy named "Turnbull". I reccomend against refinishing it, but Turnbull RESTORES them to original down to the case colors, he is a true craftsman.

Edited to add link!

turnbullrestoration.com/restorations.htm


Balming



I've heard nothing but good about Turnbull, but refinishing and restoration are two different things, or at least they are to me.
Link Posted: 1/15/2006 2:51:46 PM EDT
Balming, thanks for the link. Since posting this thread, I have also heard some good things about Glenrock Blue out of Wyoming.

www.gunbluing.com
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:01:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By SkagSig40:
I'm on the flip side. I say if you are going to keep it in the family and never sell it then restore it. It will last longer and and others will take better care of it if it looks nice rather then beat up and worn out.




+1...The gun isn't worth anything over and above its sentimental value. Have it re-blued, and let your kids enjoy the thing. Also, it might not be a bad idea to have a good hard look at all of the moving parts. My friend's 94, that was given to him by HIS grand father, is pretty worn and is in deperate need of parts replacement. Do it pre-emptively before something goes seriously wrong.
Link Posted: 1/16/2006 9:18:08 AM EDT
I live not to far from Turnbull's shop. Excellent workmanship. I am torn on this one. I like the idea for the worn from usage look as the rifles passes from generation to generation. In that way it carries a real history with it. I think it would have more impact when changing hands if it is left in original condition. I would insure that all parts are in good working order, but I don't think I would reblue it. I would also write a history of who owned it and pass that along too before it is all forgotten. Also teach the recipient how to properly care for it if they are not going to shoot it.
Link Posted: 1/17/2006 6:47:09 AM EDT
I took it to a Winchester 'smith as soon as I got it home. The action and bore are in excellent condition so no worries there. I think I will hold off on the restoration. The scabbord wear does set it apart from the newer guns and will give me something to talk about when I take the grandkids out shooting. I have five with one on the way, need to stock up on range ammo lol
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