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Posted: 12/13/2005 2:15:51 PM EDT
So I am refinishing my Yugo Mauser 24/47. I want to repolish the buttplate on the mauser. Can anyone give me some advice on doing this?

-C4-
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 2:24:37 PM EDT
Metal polishing is a very tedious, boring and labor intensive process. Here is how to do it. Start with say 120 to 150 grit wet or dry sandpaper. Wrap a piece of the 120-150 around a small dowel of say 3/8 inch diameter about 10 to 12 inches in length. Sand the entire buttplate until the entire surface has been sanded and has a uniform appearance. Then repeat with the following grits of wet or dry in the following order: 180, 220, 320, 400, 600, 800 and finally 1500.

It will then shine like a mirror. It should take a minimum of 30 to 60 minutes polishing with each grit. You will only need one sheet of wet or dry in each grit. Buy the sandpaper at Ace Hardware. Total estimated time is 4 to 6 hours!!! E-mail if any questions. Charles the Gunsmith.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 2:28:01 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911builder:
Metal polishing is a very tedious, boring and labor intensive process. Here is how to do it. Start with say 120 to 150 grit wet or dry sandpaper. Wrap a piece of the 120-150 around a small dowel of say 3/8 inch diameter about 10 to 12 inches in length. Sand the entire buttplate until the entire surface has been sanded and has a uniform appearance. Then repeat with the following grits of wet or dry in the following order: 180, 220, 320, 400, 600, 800 and finally 1500.

It will then shine like a mirror. It should take a minimum of 30 to 60 minutes polishing with each grit. You will only need one sheet of wet or dry in each grit. Buy the sandpaper at Ace Hardware. Total estimated time is 4 to 6 hours!!! E-mail if any questions. Charles the Gunsmith.



Wow... that sounds like fun... Should I treat the metal with something to prevent rust?

-C4-
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 3:30:53 PM EDT
Before or after the sanding? Or to replace the sanding? On rifles that are frequently used in the field I have sanded out the worst spots with the rougher grit papers. Then I have bead blasted and blued or parkerized the buttplates. It does not match the rifle finish but it does serve the purpose of protecting the metal buttplate. Really you have to be the judge of what you need.

BTW I have spent up to 3 full 8 to 10 hour days polishing a rifle such as a Rem 700 at the clients' request. Believe me they paid for it. But the rifle looked like a flawless mirror. VERY labor intensive and no power machines can be used as they do all the wrong things in all the wrong places. Charles.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 6:55:39 PM EDT
Find some buffing wheels if you want to skip the handsanding. Or hand sand it down to say about 320, then beadblast it to get an awesome Matte finish.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 6:57:57 PM EDT
(1) Dremel using
(2) Buffing wheels with
(3) Jewler's rouge.

Quick & Easy.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 7:05:25 PM EDT
Unfortunately, if you don't do the sanding first all you will do with a buffer system is polish the existing pits, scratches and dings in the metal. That looks like shit. I'm speaking as a professional gunsmith of course. Charles.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 7:37:39 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911builder:
Unfortunately, if you don't do the sanding first all you will do with a buffer system is polish the existing pits, scratches and dings in the metal. That looks like shit. I'm speaking as a professional gunsmith of course. Charles.



Granted, but I assumed by "repolish", C4 meant that the metal was already smooth but had lost its shine. No reason to rough it up again if the surface is good.
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 8:11:24 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911builder:
Before or after the sanding? Or to replace the sanding? On rifles that are frequently used in the field I have sanded out the worst spots with the rougher grit papers. Then I have bead blasted and blued or parkerized the buttplates. It does not match the rifle finish but it does serve the purpose of protecting the metal buttplate. Really you have to be the judge of what you need.

BTW I have spent up to 3 full 8 to 10 hour days polishing a rifle such as a Rem 700 at the clients' request. Believe me they paid for it. But the rifle looked like a flawless mirror. VERY labor intensive and no power machines can be used as they do all the wrong things in all the wrong places. Charles.



I just spent the last several hours polishing it... it is as mirrored as I wanted it to be... I also shoved some rust protector on it. It looks good. Now I just need to finish the rest of the rifle and take some pictures. Thanks for the advice.

-C4-
Link Posted: 12/13/2005 8:12:22 PM EDT
Here is a question though. Is it better to use cirular or linear strokes when sanding?

-C4-
Link Posted: 12/14/2005 2:55:15 AM EDT
Linear works best. Take care. Charles.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 5:49:22 PM EDT
Update for those interested.

I couldn't get all of the pits out without really taking off metal.

-C4-
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 6:19:48 PM EDT
Looks really good. Glad it worked for you. Charles.
Link Posted: 1/1/2006 7:25:43 PM EDT
Yeah. Worked well. FYI it was up to 2500 grain and then I used Noxon Metal Polish. Thanks for the info. On to polish the bolt.

-C4-
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 12:11:39 AM EDT
My neighbor across the street is an artist,and he uses a fine abrasive paper to do his carcoal paintings!!

It's sold by the sheet and it is the shits for removing rust ,without removeing metal!!!

Bob
Link Posted: 1/14/2006 6:23:46 AM EDT

Originally Posted By bobbyjack:
My neighbor across the street is an artist,and he uses a fine abrasive paper to do his carcoal paintings!!

It's sold by the sheet and it is the shits for removing rust ,without removeing metal!!!

Bob



What exactly is it?
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