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Posted: 7/23/2003 9:17:48 AM EDT
Hey I was looking at laser rangefinders on riflescopes.com.

In the Bushnell section, they say things like, "5-800 yards, deer-sized target to 250 yards." And things like that.

So for the rangefinders, what are the real limitations? Is an 800 yard range finder really an 800 yard rangefinder, or to get that range, do you need to set up a full-sized mirror 800 yards downrange and get a good reading?

I'm asking because I go to a public range without any indication of the ranges you're shooting at so everything has to be estimated. Or I bring along a tapemeasure and a partner and measure it the old fashioned way. This gets tedious after 25 yards, though.
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 9:23:12 AM EDT
(On an unrelated topic, your IM box is full.)

What's the wave-length of the rangefinder in question ?? (In 'nm')
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 9:26:57 AM EDT
If it's a LEICA, then 800 means 800 and 1200 means 1200, and I have even shot 890 yards once w/ the LRF 800, and appeared range was correct, in that instance.

And no, ya don't need anything special, a tree will do or a knoll/hill... (a rest helps w/ steading the range finder tho)

As to any other brand, I have no idea....

Mike
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 12:25:52 PM EDT
They are crap [Whoops, sorry, that's boresighters.]

Laser range finders have a divergent laser beam that can impinge on several targets at different ranges depending on the height of the target above the ground. The range finder wants to measure the strongest signal, hence it may detect a return from the lower edge of the beam - this phonemenom is aggravated as the range is increased. The way to defeat this is to range a target, then lightly raise the instrument and watch for a change in the range measurement to be sure that the correct target is ranged.

Lower cost range finders have more divergent beams, which means they can't range as far because the beam is so wide the returned energy gets too low to measure and it impinges on too many possible targets. Sometimes the method of elevating the range finder slightly can reduce the signal noise and permit a measurement, even beyond the distance rating.

Everyone that has a Leica likes them, and the only way to get a better instrument like a Geovid is to spend buckets more money (or buy one of the surplus Swiss optical units at about $500 - but they are about 4 feet long, not exactly practical for toting in the field).

Aimpoint has a new range finder that is "rated" to 1600 yards, but I haven't seen any reviews.
Link Posted: 7/23/2003 3:31:53 PM EDT
I've gotten a reading out to 980 yards with my Leica 800.
Link Posted: 7/24/2003 3:21:57 PM EDT
I had a Bushnell 600 Yardage Pro. The best I could get out of it was a cedar tree at a little over 500 yards. Now if you were to scan something highly reflective, like say a road sign, you would probably get the unit's maximum range.
Link Posted: 7/24/2003 3:46:11 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2003 3:47:18 PM EDT by Gun_Addict]

Now if you were to scan something highly reflective, like say a road sign, you would probably get the unit's maximum range



Thats what I have been told. That the acutal range and accracy depends on how reflective your target is.
Link Posted: 7/24/2003 4:04:54 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 7/24/2003 4:06:47 PM EDT by thinman]

Originally Posted By mr_wilson:
If it's a LEICA, then 800 means 800 and 1200 means 1200, and I have even shot 890 yards once w/ the LRF 800, and appeared range was correct, in that instance.

And no, ya don't need anything special, a tree will do or a knoll/hill... (a rest helps w/ steading the range finder tho)

As to any other brand, I have no idea....



Mike



Ditto!!! I have owned 3 brands of rangefinders and the Leica 1200 is the gas. You will not be disappointed.
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