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Posted: 6/18/2003 4:50:25 PM EDT
Is this something I should try to do myself or no?
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 5:42:31 PM EDT
It isn't hard, but requires patience and investment in stuff.

A buffing wheel to get the parts as smooth as possible before bluing - almost mirror finish.

An open-air place to do bluing. You do not want to breath the fumes.

A cleaning tank with burner to get the cleaning solution hot.

A bluing tank with burner.

A rinse tank to wash off the salts.

Water displacing oil and preservative.

Everything you need can be bought from Brownells. All the goodies come with instructions. The "first step bluing kit" runs $526.42
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 5:45:27 PM EDT
Oh hell, I thought I could buy a "wal-mart special" kit and re-blue this pistol I have myself.

I guess I will just send it off for someone else to do it.

Thanks for posting though!
Link Posted: 6/18/2003 10:36:44 PM EDT
Out of sheer boredom, I blued the barrel of my EEA Witness, using a cold blue I bought at Wal-Mart. Came out pretty good, too. I don't know if I'd try to do more than small parts with it, though.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 1:29:17 AM EDT
The "do it yourself kits" are okay for touch up, but the bluing on my full gun project didn't hold up too well. And yes, I followed the instructions to the letter.
Link Posted: 6/19/2003 8:06:28 AM EDT
Yes, you can do it yourself with a minimum of equipment, well under $100. And you may even be lucky and have most of the stuff already.

I have a detailed write-up on my page.

www.geocities.com/kemays/formula.htm

Cold blue has its place... in out-of-the way areas, like under the handguards of the stock, or other places that will rarely get abraded or handled. It is a poor substitute for a hot blue on frequently handled surfaces.

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