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Posted: 5/4/2003 8:17:23 PM EDT
Fellas,

I have several little projects going that require re-finishing. I am interested in the Brownells spray on finish.

Has anyone used it with good results....would you be willing to impart your knowledge and give me a step by step rundown?

I figured that ya'll could help me avoid some silly mistakes. I only have one oven, so does it leave the oven unservicable for baking food?
The directions call for abrasive blasting the parts to be finished, but I don't know how to do that. Also, it said that both the parts and the spray need to be heated up to 90 degrees.....wtf? I need a idiot proof way to do it.....I do have some engine enamel!!! Maybe that is more my speed!

Thanks in advance,
JarHead94
Link Posted: 5/4/2003 9:28:54 PM EDT
I have used the Brownells Aluma-Hyde II with not good results.
I put it on as directed, but was not happy with the results.
It was probably me, although it seemed like the parts took a week to dry/cure.
This is really one of those subjects where the term "YMMV" applies.

Far and away the best results I've had were with Rustoleum BBQ Black High Temp paint on my L1A1.
I 'let it cure' for about 4 days.
It has NEVER come off.

Depending upon your specific items, the Brownells might work.
Your oven should probably be cleaned after baking gun parts and paint...
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 5:41:24 AM EDT
I have used both,Aluma-HydeII and Baking Lacquer with good results.

I have a springfield M1A with fiberglass stock, the factory krinkle finish started to flake,so I sprayed over it with Aluma-Hyde matte black, let it fully cure for a week and it looks very good and seems durable.

The Baking Lacquer was used to refinish the slide of my Glock and I ended up doing a friends slide also. Looks very good,the only place on the slide that has chipped off,is at the ejection port,the ejected cases hit the slide in that spot,even after a couple of years it still looks very good.

Just follow the directions,don't get impatient do 2 light coats,resist the urge to lay it on heavy, also I warmed both products in a pot of warm water and just let the can sit in there for 10 min. While baking the slide in the oven, their was an odor and very slight smoke comming off the slide, but nothing to worry about.

With the Aluma-HydeII, the overspray really floats all over the place so use good ventilation and wear a mask.
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 8:49:10 AM EDT
Great results refinishing A1 stocks with Alumihyde II.

Great results with spray on moly stuff on a shotgun barrel.

KEY POINT: Follow directions.
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 9:44:27 AM EDT
I would recommmend against Aluma-Hyde for pistol refinishing. I painted the frame of a Kahr K40 with it, and am not happy with its performance.

Like others have said, it took about 7 days to harden up.

Its scratch resistance is no better than Krylon. It can easily be removed with a fingernail.

When applied in areas with sliding friction, it tends to rub off and gum up the works. It was making the slide drag to the point that it was not going fully into battery with each round.

It is OK for finishing stocks, and cosmetic surfaces, but it just doesn't compare to Norrell's moly resin (my current favorite), the baking lacquer, or even the teflon-moly spray.
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 9:45:18 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/5/2003 9:47:14 AM EDT by RobarSR60]

Originally Posted By JarHead94:
Fellas,
I have several little projects going that require re-finishing. I am interested in the Brownells spray on finish.

Has anyone used it with good results....would you be willing to impart your knowledge and give me a step by step rundown?
Thanks in advance,
JarHead94



JarHead...
I just refinished my rifle with the Alluma-Hyde2. If you decide to use it, just keep a couple of simple things in mind, and you'll be OK. First, clean whatever you're gonna refinish within an inch of it's life. Degrease it completely. Oils, and solvents are the enemy, and will keep the finish from sticking properly.

Second, spray the piece in a well ventilated room (I used the garage), and make sure you have nothing around it that can touch it.

Third, if you can heat the part to 90+ degrees before you spray it, you'll get a better finish. And remember to spray light coats.

Lastly, if you can keep the part at a constant 90-110 degrees, it'll cure much more quickly. I have a set of Halogen work lights that I kept on my barreled action for 3 days. It was fully cured at that point. The gloss paints will take longer to cure. If you can keep them heated for a couple of days, great. It'll take the full 7 days for them to cure though.

Just remember, after you spray the part, don't touch it. You'll get finger prints on it, and you'll curse the moment you do.

Roughing up the surface is recommended, but not required. Just remember to clean the part thoroughly before spraying it. I can't stress that enough.
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 8:33:55 PM EDT
Robar,

What type of cleaner/degreaser do you recommend using? Acetone?

JarHead94
Link Posted: 5/5/2003 9:20:25 PM EDT
Acetone would probably work just fine.

This stuff is slow curing. I would not handle it for a week.

Dennis Jenkins



Originally Posted By JarHead94:
Robar,

What type of cleaner/degreaser do you recommend using? Acetone?

JarHead94

Link Posted: 5/6/2003 2:20:34 PM EDT
I've used it on a bunch of things with real good success. It says right in the instructions that it takes a week to cure. Once cured, its tough stuff. You can handle it after 24 hours, but its best to just let it sit a couple of days at least. As was mentioned, you need to degrease well and give it a couple of light coats, and again, follow the directions as there is a time frame to do it in. Prep is everything. Have things set up and ready to go and have some way to hold what you paint and a place and way to hang it out of the way. If you take your time and pay attention to details, it will give you a good job.
Link Posted: 5/6/2003 2:43:38 PM EDT
I've used it to refinish some old AR15 mags. I tried doing it a couple of different ways. The best I found was to preheat the mags in an oven to about 100 degrees and then spray and put back into oven for a couple of hours. Then I let it sit for about 2 days without touching them.

Turned out well and has held up well except where mags contact mag well.

I personally wouldn't use it on a complete firearm that had even the slightest value. I would prefer to spend the extra cash and have a local gunsmith do parkerizing.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 6:53:28 AM EDT

Originally Posted By JarHead94:
Robar,
What type of cleaner/degreaser do you recommend using? Acetone?
JarHead94



Acetone would work well. I just used brake cleaner though.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 11:05:05 AM EDT
The matte seems to hold up a little better and cure faster than the "gloss" colors.

Still I would not suggest using it on any metal parts that rub together. Teflon moly is the way to go for that, and you don't have to wait half a fortnight for it to cure either.
Link Posted: 5/7/2003 1:04:42 PM EDT

I've done an SAR in the matte black. It has held up really well over 2000 rounds later. It came out really smooth. Any time you're using a rattle can, a bit of talent is required. Don't get too close to the parts. Use thin coats. I let mine sit for 2 weeks before reassembly.

Link Posted: 5/8/2003 5:52:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By BusMaster007:
I have used the Brownells Aluma-Hyde II with not good results.
I put it on as directed, but was not happy with the results.
It was probably me, although it seemed like the parts took a week to dry/cure.
This is really one of those subjects where the term "YMMV" applies.

Far and away the best results I've had were with Rustoleum BBQ Black High Temp paint on my L1A1.
I 'let it cure' for about 4 days.
It has NEVER come off.

Depending upon your specific items, the Brownells might work.
Your oven should probably be cleaned after baking gun parts and paint...

I`m still looking for a commercialy available finish that works.....have only tried the baking laquer so far...but no good results......a certain brand of flat engine high heat paints has worked for me pretty well....black and dark grey.....otherwise...if the spray stuff is like the laquer...too$$$ to keep failing...patient or not......
Link Posted: 5/8/2003 2:48:10 PM EDT
Link Posted: 5/19/2003 9:52:22 PM EDT
A word of caution:

Don't get the "dark Parkerizing gray" thinking it will actually look like anything remotely resembling a parkerized finish. It comes out a LIGHT gray.
Link Posted: 5/20/2003 6:46:55 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/20/2003 6:52:05 AM EDT by Cincinnatus]
I disagree.
I sprayed "Dark Parkerizing Gray" on an ARMS #38 that I had milled.
The color matched exactly.





It's impossible to tell where the paint starts and ends.
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