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Posted: 12/2/2002 5:54:49 AM EDT
There a few screws and the reciever that where losse2 little ones on the left side and a big one on the right side I was just wondering if there are any that should be losse on the reciever? and also what is a good way to glue the stock, if you take the stock off you will see that it is starting to crack.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 9:20:22 PM EDT
Don't be suprised, I had a customer last year who I ordered a Marlin lever gun in 45/70, when it came in the hammer extension was a rustball, the rust had also marred the finish of the rifle a bit. All factory sealed in the box.
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 9:48:35 PM EDT

Originally Posted By NYCOP:
There a few screws and the reciever that where losse2 little ones on the left side and a big one on the right side I was just wondering if there are any that should be losse on the reciever? and also what is a good way to glue the stock, if you take the stock off you will see that it is starting to crack.



Any good wood glue, carefully applied by a competent person should fix the cracking stock. If its visible when assembled, the stock will probably have to be refinished after gluing. Find a good cabinet-maker who's firearms friendly if you can't find a gunsmith to do it.

Dunno about the loose screws though (although I know a few people that "came out of the box with a few screws loose", as it were)

FOTBR
Link Posted: 12/2/2002 10:48:25 PM EDT
I bought a 9mm camp carbine (NIB) that came with a barrel that was half-way unscrewed from the receiver.
Link Posted: 12/3/2002 6:01:44 PM EDT
The Marlin lever guns do have a tendency to loosen certain screws; mainly the hammer screw, and the finger lever screw. A dab of Loktite fixes this just fine. You don't even have to take the screws all the way out. Just back'em out about halfway, put a drop of the Loktite in the exposed threads in the hole on the right side of the action, and tighten them back up, Wipe off any excess, and you're good to go.

Re the crack in the stock, I get the impression you're saying the crack is in the tenon of the stock, where it doesn't show unless you take the stock out of the action. If this is so, and I've had it happen to me, what you want to do is keep the crack from spreading to the exposed area of the stock. I drill a small hole right at the end of the crack, then file a shallow channel right along the length of the crack and fill the hole and the channel with fiberglass bedding compound. This almost always "deactivates" the crack, and keeps it from going any further.
Link Posted: 12/4/2002 4:02:37 AM EDT
If you want to replace the wood....boydboys.com have them very reasonable
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