Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login
Site Notices
Posted: 10/28/2002 5:11:11 PM EDT
Bought a Rem 700 Carbine in .243 today from a Widow. She said she thinks her husband has had the rifle sense the late 50's. I know very little about this type firearm , How can I tell if it is a pre 64 ? If it is, what would one in 95 % condition be worth? Thanks for all help.
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 5:28:43 PM EDT
As for as I know, your reference to pre-64 would only be for a Winchester.
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 6:13:15 PM EDT

I know very little about this type firearm , How can I tell if it is a pre 64 ?

What's the significance here? As was pointed out, Winchesters are the only guns to which this date has any meaning.


She said she thinks her husband has had the rifle sense the late 50's.

I doubt it. The Model 700 wasn't introduced until 1962. Nothing special to note other than the rifles made prior to 1982 had safeties that lock the bolt in addition to the trigger.
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 6:40:05 PM EDT
Thanks Guys , Told you I knew VERY little about this type of firearm. BOY , Do I feel stupid.
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 8:07:48 PM EDT
I just remembered something I read about the older M700 safeties. It seems than when the safety is put in the fire postion, to open the bolt, that the rifle could discharge.
To be on the safe side, I would contact Remington with this matter.
And there are no stupid questions, you did quite well.
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 8:17:14 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Jim_Dandy:

I know very little about this type firearm , How can I tell if it is a pre 64 ?

What's the significance here? As was pointed out, Winchesters are the only guns to which this date has any meaning.


Pre 64 is a date that has significance to Winchester, mainly the model 94 & 70. Manufacturing proccesses were simplified, the M70 lost its claw extactor, etc.Many think that the manufacturing shortcuts lowered the quality of these guns. (true to some extent)
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 9:48:14 PM EDT

I just remembered something I read about the older M700 safeties. It seems than when the safety is put in the fire postion, to open the bolt, that the rifle could discharge.

Untrue. Due to improper trigger adjustments outside of the factory, the rifle can discharge without the shooter intending to do so. To minimize liability, Remington has chosen to modify the Model 700 and related rifles with a safety that does not lock the bolt, permitting the rifle to be unloaded with the safety on.


Pre 64 is a date that has significance to Winchester, mainly the model 94 & 70. Manufacturing proccesses were simplified, the M70 lost its claw extactor, etc.Many think that the manufacturing shortcuts lowered the quality of these guns. (true to some extent)

Uh, gee, we're talking REMINGTON rifles here. His error was already pointed out. What are you adding?
Link Posted: 10/28/2002 10:28:50 PM EDT
Jim_Dandy
If the man wasn't confused before, he is now.
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 12:13:38 AM EDT

If the man wasn't confused before, he is now.

Uh, no confusion here, just the correct information for which you seem to be at a loss.
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:04:15 PM EDT
Jim_Dandy

I don't intent to get into a pissing contest, but I am sure that I'm correct about the older M700 saftey.

If I'm not, please prove me wrong.
Link Posted: 10/29/2002 7:24:36 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/29/2002 7:36:42 PM EDT by Jim_Dandy]

I don't intent to get into a pissing contest, but I am sure that I'm correct about the older M700 saftey[SIC].

Uh, no, you're not correct. Do you even OWN any Model 700s? Didn't think so. The bolt locking style of safety is not itself unsafe. If the trigger has been improperly adjusted (i.e., incorrect sear engagement), then the rifle can discharge if the bolt or trigger assembly is jarred. This also includes opening the bolt or disengaging the safety for unloading. Remington has elected to change the safety to the type that does not lock the bolt so that the chamber can be unloaded while the trigger is locked. Interestingly, Remington offered retrofitting of the older bolt locking safety to post-1982 Model 700s as late as 1998, but due to liability concerns (and people spreading bullshit rumors), has opted to discontinue that practice, too.

From the Remington website:

Remington is offering a safety modification program to remove the bolt-lock mechanism from certain Remington bolt-action centerfire firearms made prior to March, 1982. (Post-1982 bolt-action firearms were not manufactured with bolt-lock mechanisms). To determine whether your firearm has a bolt-lock mechanism and is subject to the safety modification program, “click” on the model listed below and follow the directions included.

The unloading process for most bolt-action firearms with a bolt-lock mechanism cannot begin unless the manual safety is placed in the ‘F” or “Off or Fire” position. If you participate in the program your firearm will be modified to eliminate the bolt-lock feature and you will be able to unload your firearm while the safety is kept in the “S” or “ On Safe” position. The operation of your firearm will not otherwise be affected.

Here are the basic program elements:

The firearms will be cleaned and inspected and the bolt lock mechanism will be removed for $20.00 plus shipping and handling.

We will return the gun to you with a $20.00 rebate coupon good towards the purchase of any Remington brand safety product (eye protection, hearing protection, cable and trigger locks, gun cabinets and gun safes.)





If your Model 700 or 40-X rifle has a bolt-lock mechanism, it is eligible for this bolt-lock Safety Modification Program. If you participate, your firearm will be cleaned and inspected for proper functioning by a qualified gunsmith. Once the condition of your firearm has been assessed, you will be notified of one of the following:

  • Your firearm’s trigger assembly is otherwise in good operating condition, and the gunsmith will proceed to physically remove the bolt-lock feature so that your rifle can be loaded and unloaded while the safety remains in the “S” or “On Safe” position; or


  • Your rifle’s trigger assembly is found to be in an unsatisfactory or potentially unsafe operating condition because of any number of factors, including wear, alteration or maintenance. The entire trigger assembly will be replaced with a new factory trigger assembly, which does not incorporate a bolt-lock mechanism.





If I'm not, please prove me wrong.

Already did. In the future, please refrain from posting BULLSHIT. Thanks.
Top Top