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Posted: 4/19/2002 3:48:30 PM EDT
I've got an odd Stevens "tip-up" breechloader single shot in .22 or .25 rimfire cal. Anyone know anything about these oldies? I've heard it called a Schutzen (sp?) pattern 3 or pattern 5.
Don't know for sure what I have other than it has a patent date of 1864. Can anybody tell me anything about this one?
loose-round
Post any replies or e-mail me. Any and all info would certainly be appreciated!
Behind the on this one...
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 3:55:44 PM EDT

Originally Posted By loose-round:
I've got an odd Stevens "tip-up" breechloader single shot in .22 or .25 rimfire cal. Anyone know anything about these oldies? I've heard it called a Schutzen (sp?) pattern 3 or pattern 5.
Don't know for sure what I have other than it has a patent date of 1864. Can anybody tell me anything about this one?
loose-round
Post any replies or e-mail me. Any and all info would certainly be appreciated!
Behind the on this one...





Sure its not a Stevens "Favorite" That model is a single shot breech loading .22. They still make them. They are a cheap model .22 cal. I'm gonna inheret one that was originately bought by my great grandfather.They were used by trappers alot to finish off the animals in thier traps.
CAPITALIST
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 4:29:17 PM EDT
Nope... Not a Favorite. This beast has a 28" octagonal barrel that's fully exposed, no forward handguard of any type, a very ornate trigger guard and a deeply curved butt with a very high cheekrest. The barrel and trigger were originally "browned" and the receiver, trigger guard and buttplate were hard chrome or nickel plated. It's 41" long overall, and weighs about 8 or 9 pounds. Any ideas
loose-round
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 4:38:47 PM EDT
I can't help you with it but they might have some info here www.e-gunparts.com/forum/forum2.asp?cat=4

I have been searching for info on an old Sears/JC Higgins/Stevens bolt action .22 (need a new stock) so if you find a good source let me know...
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 6:59:16 PM EDT
The book the "Breach Loading Single Shot Match Rifle" by Ned Roberts and Ken Waters has descriptions & pictures of various early Stevens rifles.

A brief excerpt from page 38-9 that may help you ID your rifle is:

". . . the earliest models were light rifles chambered for the 22, 32, 38, and 44 rimfire
cartridges, but by 1875 centerfire rifles were available and a serious effort was being made to
interest the growing numbers of match shooters. New special Stevens reloadable cartridges were
introduced, including the 38—35, 38—45, 44—50, and 44—65, all having the then new straight
case with Boxer-type primer. In addition, the popular 38 and 44 Extra Long centerfires were
offered. Between 1872 and 1888, a total of sixteen models, sporting and target, all of tip-up type, were placed on the market and known variously as “Open Sight Rifles” (Nos. 1 and 2), “Combined Sight Rifles” (Nos. 3 and 4), “Expert” (Nos. 5 and 6), “Premier” (Nos. 7 and 8), “New Model Range” (Nos. 9 and 10), “Ladies” (Nos. 11, 12, 13, and 14), and “Crack Shot Rifles” (Nos. 15 and 16).

These frames were of cast steel, nickel plated, and perfectly safe with the black powder
cartridges for which they were intended, but it was necessary to place the hammer at half-cock
before attempting to open the action and reload, to prevent both breaking the projecting firing pin and accidental firing of the new cartridge when the breech was snapped closed."

A picture on p. 40 shows a rifle with a hinged breach like a break open shotgun and with considerable belly in the rounded receiver, a nearly round trigger guard and a ornate finger guard. The book is a good source and has some additional info that may help you.
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 7:05:34 PM EDT
If it's the kind that has a release button on the side and hinges open like a single-shot shotgun, I think those kind are generally older than the lever operated/falling block Stevens rifles that were popular after 1900. A lot of light "bicycle rifles" were made like that, but it sounds like yours is pretty heavy. And it sounds fairly collectible to my ignorant mind, with the ornate schutzen features you mention.

Oh, here I found handy Frank de Haas' book, Single Shot Rifles and Actions. It says this type of rifle was made between 1870 and 1900 in several grades.

If you want a rough idea of the value, try to find a recent copy of Flayderman's Guide to Antique American Firearms. I think that's the exact title. Maybe a local bookstore might have a copy you can peek at.
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 9:19:02 PM EDT
Shadowblade I did a web search a year or so back for "antique rifle parts" and I found a guy in Florida that specialized in that kind of stuff. I was looking for an extractor for a Stevens Mod. 15 bolt action, and as impossible as it seemed, he had a new Stevens part in the original paper package. It was $5 plus mailing, but I got the old rifle firing again. It originally belonged to my great-grandfather, and I've since passed it on to my oldest son.
That made an extra space in my safe for another new toy. Colt XM-177. :-))
l-r
Link Posted: 4/19/2002 9:41:54 PM EDT
Kirk,
Your description is on the mark. From what little info I've been able to uncover, the "pattern type" could be determined from the number of "dots" stamped on the left side of the breech lock. This one has 4 dots, and I guess I could safely assume it's a "combined sight" or possibly the "expert" model. It does indeed have a 2 stage lock on the hammer, and a floating firing pin. The trigger pull is incredible too, even after all these years. It's very crisp without any creep at all and it breaks at approximately 2.5 lbs.
My dad and I plinked with it using modern .22 lr, and fortunately it did'nt go k-boom. It's an incredibly accurate shooter too. I could hold about a .5 inch group at approximately 100 yds. Not too shabby for a verified antique.
I would estimate the finish condition at 60/65% NRA, and the mechanical condition at 85/90%.
Now if was really worth anything.
loose-round
Link Posted: 4/23/2002 8:01:41 PM EDT
loose-round:

Don't know anything about the value - however, if it is that accurate, I imagine you will astonish and amaze many shooters who see your rifle as nothing but an obsolete antique. After all, it doesn't have to me made in 2002 to be accurate. I hope you enjoy it!
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