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Posted: 3/29/2002 1:12:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2002 1:13:28 AM EDT by rahimiv]



these were shot with my remington 700 BDL in 7mm mag at about 100 yards... I was using handloads with about 39gr of reloader 7 and hornady 120gr V-max bullets on mixed remington case... I dont know if thats the problem since the remington case is mixed (has different firings) or its because I shoot like crap... is there a shooting school or can someone give me a tip on how to shoot?

PS: the headshot was done on purpose, I aimed for center of the head... I believe its at about 50 yard.... (need to start bringing notebooks to the range)
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 4:14:00 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 7:04:49 AM EDT
I'm thinking it's got to be your ammo. No gun can shoot groups that big...especially a Remington 700. It's physically impossible unless the barrel is completely shot out or the ammo is bad or inconsistent. If your rifle is scoped, zeroed and you use factory ammo, your groups should be at least 3" or better.
There is only one other possibility...you're jerking the trigger. Benchrest your rifle, breathe and relax and just keep applying pressure with your trigger finger UNTIL the gun fires....don't try to make it happen...wait until it does.
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 9:46:23 AM EDT
For one, I think that 39g of powder is extremely low. Although I am not familiar with the 7mm and their loads, a 7mm casing for a 120g bullet should be able to safely accommodate 57-62 grains of powder. Because you have 35% less powder you may encounter problems with uneven ignition.....I may be wrong on this but I reload .223, 6mm, .270 and .350 mag on a regular basis. In fact the 39g is what I load for the 6mm on an 85g bullet!

Try some good factory ammo first...make sure all screws are tight on the scope, mounts, and receiver.

It would also be helpful for us to identified problems if you labeled the shots in chronological and circle the 3 shot groups.

Other equipment problems could be the result of damage to the bore of the barrel or problems w/ the bedding.
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 9:55:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2002 9:57:14 AM EDT by rahimiv]

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
For one, I think that 39g of powder is extremely low. Although I am not familiar with the 7mm and their loads, a 7mm casing for a 120g bullet should be able to safely accommodate 57-62 grains of powder. Because you have 35% less powder you may encounter problems with uneven ignition.....I may be wrong on this but I reload .223, 6mm, .270 and .350 mag on a regular basis. In fact the 39g is what I load for the 6mm on an 85g bullet!

Try some good factory ammo first...make sure all screws are tight on the scope, mounts, and receiver.

It would also be helpful for us to identified problems if you labeled the shots in chronological and circle the 3 shot groups.

Other equipment problems could be the result of damage to the bore of the barrel or problems w/ the bedding.



According to lyman manual, 39.7 or so is the starting load for reloader's 7. If I put 50 grains of the stuff in it the thing would explode (the max load is around 47 grains or so) I suspect it could be inconsistant ammo, because I keep using mixed brass its hard to keep the pressure consistant, I was using lee powder measure to measure the powders, maybe next time I could weight them out one by one (although it would take forever) Scope could be problematic... the mount appears to be remington factory mount, and the scope seems to move in the rings when it fires! I would need a badger or something but dont have the money... the scope itself is a leupold variX II 39-x40mm. I dont think the barrel is shot out, last I checked the bore is shiny and the rifling is sharp. I usually clean them with JB bore paste, is this a good idea?

Oh one more thing, the trigger on a stock 700 is too heavy, but it seems the screws are locked with epoxy, how do I get the epoxy off?
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 10:25:38 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rahimiv:

Originally Posted By VTHOKIESHOOTER:
For one, I think that 39g of powder is extremely low. Although I am not familiar with the 7mm and their loads, a 7mm casing for a 120g bullet should be able to safely accommodate 57-62 grains of powder. Because you have 35% less powder you may encounter problems with uneven ignition.....I may be wrong on this but I reload .223, 6mm, .270 and .350 mag on a regular basis. In fact the 39g is what I load for the 6mm on an 85g bullet!

Try some good factory ammo first...make sure all screws are tight on the scope, mounts, and receiver.

It would also be helpful for us to identified problems if you labeled the shots in chronological and circle the 3 shot groups.

Other equipment problems could be the result of damage to the bore of the barrel or problems w/ the bedding.



According to lyman manual, 39.7 or so is the starting load for reloader's 7. If I put 50 grains of the stuff in it the thing would explode (the max load is around 47 grains or so) I suspect it could be inconsistant ammo, because I keep using mixed brass its hard to keep the pressure consistant, I was using lee powder measure to measure the powders, maybe next time I could weight them out one by one (although it would take forever) Scope could be problematic... the mount appears to be remington factory mount, and the scope seems to move in the rings when it fires! I would need a badger or something but dont have the money... the scope itself is a leupold variX II 39-x40mm. I dont think the barrel is shot out, last I checked the bore is shiny and the rifling is sharp. I usually clean them with JB bore paste, is this a good idea?

Oh one more thing, the trigger on a stock 700 is too heavy, but it seems the screws are locked with epoxy, how do I get the epoxy off?



recipes.alliantpowder.com/rg.taf?_function=centerfire&step=1

I don't mean to insult you or try to be a smart ass, but here is what alliant recomends, go to the 7mm links....reloaders 7 probably isn't be best poweder to use if you can only use 39 grains.
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 10:32:11 AM EDT
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 12:02:34 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2002 12:03:47 PM EDT by Boomholzer]
I seen better groups with a mini-14 during rapid fire!

Is that 50yrd group benched?

Mixed brass would never add that much inconsistancy unless they were bugs, spiders and mud packed into every one.

All good advice here. As was stated before:
1)Inspect optics "Scope could be problematic... the mount appears to be remington factory mount, and the scope seems to move in the rings when it fires! Thats not good!
2)Purchase some factory ammo, 140-160gr
3)You don't sound too confident in your marksmanship. If the factory ammo does not improve your groups, get someone else to try.
4)No luck with yet? Try new scope.
5)No luck yet? Consult Rem or Gunsmith.
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 8:59:00 PM EDT
if your scope is lose in your mounts then when you fire it, your changing your zero... Bluemax
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 9:16:00 PM EDT
To you generally get beter groups with other rifles?
Have you tried other ammo in this one?

I guess that you're more interested in accuracy than you are in killing people, and some of these are "sniper" related, but maybe you could take a look at:

http://155.217.58.58/cgi-bin/atdl.dll/fm/23-10/toc.htm

http://www.emergency.com/polcsnpr.htm

http://www.snipercountry.com/ballistics/index.html

http://www.frii.com/~gosplow/abasr.html

http://www.biggerhammer.net/manuals/23-10/ch2.pdf

Good luck. Keep practicing, and if the problem is with the rifle, then try to narrow down the possibilities by process of elimination.
Link Posted: 3/29/2002 9:41:48 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2002 9:48:16 PM EDT by mjmensale]

Scope could be problematic... the mount appears to be remington factory mount, and the scope seems to move in the rings when it fires! I would need a badger or something but dont have the money... the scope itself is a leupold variX II 39-x40mm.


Your scope has a 1" tube. Your rings are probably 30mm which would account for the movement. You need new 1" rings (or 30mm with inserts) and they don't have to be Badgers unless you want to spend the big bucks. The base and rings must be secured with blue loktite or you'll never have a solid mount.


Oh one more thing, the trigger on a stock 700 is too heavy, but it seems the screws are locked with epoxy, how do I get the epoxy off?


Go to www.snipercountry.com/RemingtonTriggers.htm and follow the directions exactly. You should be able to reset your trigger in less than 45 minutes to break cleanly at 3 pounds. Stock Remingtons usually break around 8 pounds.

Besides the tools mentioned in the article, you'll need a trigger pull gauge and an inch/pounds torque wrench. Don't try to guess what your trigger pull is, you'll be sorry. The action screws that secure the action to the stock must be torqued to 65 inch/pounds.

You can get a good torque wrench from Sears and Sinclairs www.sinclairsintl.com carries the pull gauge.

You'll need to shoot off a benchrest or bipod using good factory match ammo (Federal GMM or Black Hills match) to determine the accuracy potential of your stick. A backpack and handloads won't cut it for this procedure.

Make sure you explain to your wife/girlfriend why you're borrowing her red nail polish! :-)

Moe
Link Posted: 3/30/2002 7:14:53 AM EDT
One other thing - check the stock to make sure the barrel isn't rubbing it anywhere. You should be able to slide three stacked business cards all the way up the barrel channel from the forend to the action.

If there's any binding or hitting, carefully remove the excess material to clear it.

And make sure you properly re-torque those action screws. As a matter of fact, make sure they weren't loose in the first place. That'll definitely throw off those groups.

Moe
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