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Posted: 3/16/2006 10:23:07 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2006 10:24:02 AM EDT by migrabill]
Just got it today. 1950 No.1 MK 3, Ishapor. Beatiful wood, like new bore, I've seen better metal. I have 2 questions.

1) When you go to "ride the bolt forward" as if chambering a round the last inch or so seems to meet with resistance- almost like it is intended tension. Is it supposed to be that way or do I need to lube it?

2) When the bolt is forward you can grab the little square knob and pull it towards you. It will lock in place and the trigger cannot be fired. Then if you pull the knob further back it will lock in place again and now you can pull the trigger again. Why? What is this? It's not a safety because that is on the side. What is the advantage of the rifle being able to do this. It dosn't chamber a new round so you would still have to action the bolt to get a new round in.

As Always - thanx for your help guys.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 11:16:07 AM EDT
On #1 it is a cock on closing action. #2 I don't really understand.

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By migrabill:
Just got it today. 1950 No.1 MK 3, Ishapor. Beatiful wood, like new bore, I've seen better metal. I have 2 questions.

1) When you go to "ride the bolt forward" as if chambering a round the last inch or so seems to meet with resistance- almost like it is intended tension. Is it supposed to be that way or do I need to lube it?

2) When the bolt is forward you can grab the little square knob and pull it towards you. It will lock in place and the trigger cannot be fired. Then if you pull the knob further back it will lock in place again and now you can pull the trigger again. Why? What is this? It's not a safety because that is on the side. What is the advantage of the rifle being able to do this. It dosn't chamber a new round so you would still have to action the bolt to get a new round in.

As Always - thanx for your help guys.

Link Posted: 3/16/2006 11:26:22 AM EDT
Thank you for the answer to #1 - I understand now.
Questions 2 - It is the cocking piece. Why can you grab and charge the cocking piece? You still have to do the bolt thing to get a new round in. So what does recocking the weapon with the cocking piece do for you?
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 12:07:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By migrabill:
Thank you for the answer to #1 - I understand now.
Questions 2 - It is the cocking piece. Why can you grab and charge the cocking piece? You still have to do the bolt thing to get a new round in. So what does recocking the weapon with the cocking piece do for you?



maybe for misfires?

I know you can do this with the K31.

I've had one round not go off and had to recock the striker and it worked the second time.
Link Posted: 3/16/2006 12:36:26 PM EDT
This is not the most up-to-date design.<G>

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By migrabill:
Thank you for the answer to #1 - I understand now.
Questions 2 - It is the cocking piece. Why can you grab and charge the cocking piece? You still have to do the bolt thing to get a new round in. So what does recocking the weapon with the cocking piece do for you?

Link Posted: 3/16/2006 12:58:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/16/2006 12:59:11 PM EDT by MauserMark]
you can also do the same thing in a sense, with a mauser action, if you drop the striker (pull the trigger), and it doesn't go bang, just rotate the bolt handle up to recock it and back down again, so you wouldn't have to recycle the action.
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 5:57:32 AM EDT
is it the mag cut off?
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 1:38:27 PM EDT
I do the same thing with my Mosin (91/30) when I use it for deer hunting. Rather than work the bolt (and scare the deer), or carry it hot (not safe), I chamber a round, point it in a safe direction, then CAREFULLY lower the cocking piece slowly by hand while holding down the trigger.

Presto--uncocked with a round in the chamber. When I want to take a shot, rather than having to work the bolt (which the deer probably will hear), I carefully pull the cocking knob back, and I'm ready to shoot.

At first I was worried about it going off if I dropped or bumped the cocking piece, so I tested it. I cold-loaded the rifle and smacked the buttplate, then the cocking piece first with the palm of my hand, then with a rubber mallet. Never went off. I figure it that wouldn't make it go off, I was pretty much okay.

Still treat it like it's loaded and cocked, though. Murphy lives.
Link Posted: 3/23/2006 7:50:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Rogue-Sasquatch:
I do the same thing with my Mosin (91/30) when I use it for deer hunting. Rather than work the bolt (and scare the deer), or carry it hot (not safe), I chamber a round, point it in a safe direction, then CAREFULLY lower the cocking piece slowly by hand while holding down the trigger.

Presto--uncocked with a round in the chamber. When I want to take a shot, rather than having to work the bolt (which the deer probably will hear), I carefully pull the cocking knob back, and I'm ready to shoot.

At first I was worried about it going off if I dropped or bumped the cocking piece, so I tested it. I cold-loaded the rifle and smacked the buttplate, then the cocking piece first with the palm of my hand, then with a rubber mallet. Never went off. I figure it that wouldn't make it go off, I was pretty much okay.

Still treat it like it's loaded and cocked, though. Murphy lives.



You know that nagants do have a saftey. If you pull the knob back when it is cocked and twist it to the left and leave it go, it will rest on the reciever.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 1:04:42 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/25/2006 1:06:45 PM EDT by Rogue-Sasquatch]
Yeah... I'm always worried about that hook shaped part of the bolt getting bumped or hung up on something and pulled off safe.

Given that I'm always pointing the gun in a safe direction, I'd just rather have it chambered and definitely uncocked versus chambered, cocked and probably on safe. If I can't get it to fire by pounding on the uncocked cocking knob with a rubber mallet, I'd say there's a reasonable margin of safety. Just my call.
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 2:49:17 PM EDT

Originally Posted By MauserMark:

Originally Posted By migrabill:
Thank you for the answer to #1 - I understand now.
Questions 2 - It is the cocking piece. Why can you grab and charge the cocking piece? You still have to do the bolt thing to get a new round in. So what does recocking the weapon with the cocking piece do for you?



maybe for misfires?

I know you can do this with the K31.

I've had one round not go off and had to recock the striker and it worked the second time.




exactly,,

03's
0­3A3's
enfields,
and krags all have this feature, (among others)
Link Posted: 3/25/2006 3:07:52 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Rogue-Sasquatch:
Yeah... I'm always worried about that hook shaped part of the bolt getting bumped or hung up on something and pulled off safe.

Given that I'm always pointing the gun in a safe direction, I'd just rather have it chambered and definitely uncocked versus chambered, cocked and probably on safe. If I can't get it to fire by pounding on the uncocked cocking knob with a rubber mallet, I'd say there's a reasonable margin of safety. Just my call.



The striker forwards puts the firing pin directly on the primer with spring tension pushing it forward. You're playing with fire. There are ramp cuts made into the receiver and striker that produces a camming action that resists unintentionally releasing the safety. There is a MUCH larger margin of safety with the mechanical safety then carrying the rifle loaded and uncocked. As long as you're cognizant of the risk, it's your call.
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