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Posted: 1/29/2006 12:35:09 AM EDT
Given the popularity and history behind lots of the major mil-surp rifles we love here, I'm surprised somebody hasn't started a new production line of some of the big ones. I bet somebody could make a freakin' mint if they put out a catalogue with the most common ones together.

WWII-era Enfields, 1903 Springfields, Mosin-Nagants (the 91/30 through the M44), the G98 and K98, K31, both the 6.5 and 7.7 Arisakas, Mannlicher-Carcanos, plus a few others probably.

If you made them in both the original chambering, and popular hunting or competition shooting chamberings of similar sizes, you'd have hunters, plinkers, custom builders, reenactors, and lots more drooling. Plus, everybody who wanted to tinker or build around the action of a classic but didn't want to destroy a collectible (or just a piece of history in general) would finally have reproductions to abuse.

I know quite a few people who would snap up a 2006 M91/30 Mosin-Nagant, in 7.62x54R, .30-06, or .308. Most of them in .30-06, but some in .308, too.

Any idea why we're still defacing WWII vet rifles?
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 12:48:52 AM EDT
Cost.

If you made a M91\30 today, it would cost $300+
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 12:53:21 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2006 3:45:54 AM EDT by Rogue-Sasquatch]
Well, hell, that's still around half of what a Remington 700 runs.

I had the impression that modern manufacturing tech and know-how would probably bring that price down a little, at least with large batches.


$300+, really? Shucks.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 6:14:45 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 8:17:08 AM EDT
Why spend $300-400 for a REPODUCTION Mosin Nagant, when you can get the real deal for around $100 for a nice Soviet MN. The new repro's would always be that, a repro. They would have virtually no collector value and have no history to them at all. Just look at the new production SA Inc M1 Garands. They are very expensive, and have no historical value at all. They are almost twice the price I paid for my service grade International Harvester M1 from the CMP and my M1 is the real deal. Most collectors would not touch a SA Inc garand with a 10ft pole. After buying one of these new production rifles, it loses most of its value(perhaps 70-80%) the minute you walk out the door of the gunshop. Good luck selling it for anything close to what you paid.

If you want a sporter, buy a used commercial rifle to tinker with, or at least only bubba a surplus barreled action or one in poor shape or not of great value.

Realistically, these repro milsurps would probably cost closer to $1000, and even then, look forward to cast receivers, MIM parts, poor metal surface finish/polishing, low grade wood stocks, and loose tolerances and very little hand fitting. If this were even close to feasable, the production would have to take place in some 3rd-world country to cut back on production costs.

Oh and BTW, repro 1903 Springfields have already been tried, and they were big steamy turds.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:55:45 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2006 9:59:36 AM EDT by RiffRandall]

Originally Posted By The_Gooch:
Why spend $300-400 for a REPODUCTION Mosin Nagant, when you can get the real deal for around $100 for a nice Soviet MN. The new repro's would always be that, a repro. They would have virtually no collector value and have no history to them at all.



+1
A major part of the appeal of mil-surp rifles is the history. I'd rather have a beat to hell Mosin-Nagant that was possibly used against/by the Finns in the Winter War or defending Mother Russia during the Great Patriotic War. A new made Mosin, no matter how nice or well made would just be a clunky bolt action.

Same for the SKS. A sewer pipe bore, "trench art" carved stock Yugo SKS is worth more (to me) than a new "still in the box & factory grease" made for the US commercial market Norinco Type 56.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 10:39:56 AM EDT
Many of our mil-suprs live on in otherforms...the M1917 in the Remington model 54...the Mauser in commercial form from Winchester & Ruger and a myriad of others...
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:17:10 PM EDT
www.tristarsportingarms.com/m10rifles.htm

Here are some reproduction #4s in either 7.62 NATO or 7.62 Soviet using either M14 or AK mags. They are EXPENSIVE!
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 9:40:01 PM EDT
Because a commercial reproduction that was built to exacting specifications would be cost prohibitive.
Because no one would buy a $1,000 Schmidt-Rubin, when you can buy them for $80 all the live long day.
Because no one would buy a repro C/R that costs more and has no history.
Because commercial reproductions of military weapons tend to be utter failures.

Commercial M1 carbines - shit and out of spec.
Commercial M1 rifles - shit and damn expensive.

Now, the commercial M1As were different - but that was because they were produced with commerical CNC'd recievers, while all the parts were GI.
This was able to keep costs down and quality up.
Ask anybody now adays what they think of Springfield "Amrory" and their cast recievers and non-GI parts.
Link Posted: 1/29/2006 10:10:54 PM EDT
I'd still like to have one of those.<G>

Dennis Jenkins


Originally Posted By SmegHead:
www.tristarsportingarms.com/m10rifles.htm

Here are some reproduction #4s in either 7.62 NATO or 7.62 Soviet using either M14 or AK mags. They are EXPENSIVE!

Link Posted: 1/29/2006 11:00:07 PM EDT
The labor and cost involved in making a mauser that every part has been completely machined from bar stock steel would be rediculously expensive. We couldnt afford to buy em if they built them EXCATLYlike they were made in the past.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 3:46:53 PM EDT
Some years ago Mauser marketed a few thousand "100th anniversary" K98s, completely new production. Also an Australian manufacturer sells new .308 No.4 Enfields and 7.62x39mm Jungle Carbines. As already mentioned, the price tags are rather heavy.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 5:16:24 PM EDT
I shot one of the 7.62 x 39 guns and it was sweet. I would buy one in a heartbeat if the were the same price as a milsurp. But not at the price they wanted for it.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 6:44:13 PM EDT

Originally Posted By tcmech:
I shot one of the 7.62 x 39 guns and it was sweet. I would buy one in a heartbeat if the were the same price as a milsurp. But not at the price they wanted for it.



And there's your answer.
Link Posted: 1/30/2006 8:49:42 PM EDT
And, our C&R license wouldn't do any good to purchase them

Doc
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