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Posted: 1/9/2006 5:24:01 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2006 5:28:49 AM EDT by tippman]
It takes me about 3 - 4 hours to clean it and only it every time I take it out to shoot. Keep in mind that this is only with about 20 - 40 rounds through it.

I am shooting the corrosive Hungarian Heavy Ball in it. I have tried other ammo but most if it sticks in the chamber to the point that I need a hammer to get the bolt open. I have not shot new ammo. My cleaning methods are as follows:

Windex with Ammonia before leaving the range.
I then use Hopps #9 Powder solvent and #9 Copper Solvent. After running several patches of this alternating between soaked and then dry patches I run a brush and then more solvent and dry patches. All of them come out completely black or really dark gray. I do this several times then use a foaming bore cleaner. Then repeat the above several more times. I never am able to get the patches to come out really clean. They are always a little gray but not black.

Any one have a better way to clean them?

Most of the time I leave it at home just because of this.

Edit: for spelling.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 5:46:28 AM EDT
You might want to add either JB bore paste or USP bore paste to your cleaning regimen. I have found that a few strokes of either one really loosens up the crud in the bore and makes cleaning easier and faster. However, if you have a rough or pitted bore, it may still take you awhile to get it clean.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 5:56:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:
You might want to add either JB bore paste or USP bore paste to your cleaning regimen. I have found that a few strokes of either one really loosens up the crud in the bore and makes cleaning easier and faster. However, if you have a rough or pitted bore, it may still take you awhile to get it clean.



Any recomendations on where to buy these?

Anything has got to be better than what I am doing now.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 5:56:34 AM EDT
Brush in your solvent and let it sit for 20 minutes or so. Clean your bolt in the meantime. YMMV.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 6:10:42 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tippman:
Any recomendations on where to buy these?

Anything has got to be better than what I am doing now.




www.sinclairintl.com

www.midwayusa.com

www.grafs.com

Just about any place that sells cleaning supplies has it.
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:14:56 PM EDT
Link Posted: 1/9/2006 1:23:09 PM EDT
well i stoppe dthe 50/50 mix crap 2 years ago,,no rust on my end,, i just brush emout,, spray in some clp.. push a patch thru,, wipe down the outside,, let it sit over night or a few days come back,, re brush,, and push a few patchs thru... have had no issues yet,, even when they sat open aired during the canes! YMMV,, just my im to lazy to mix, pour,spray, waste time,, 2 cents
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:08:16 AM EDT
Well I actually got it clean but it took alot of solvent! I ended up pluging the chamber with patches and then filled the barrel with solvent. I let it sit for 45 minutes to an hour and then cleaned it out. I do have some slight pitting is there any way to combat that?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:38:49 AM EDT

Originally Posted By tippman:
I do have some slight pitting is there any way to combat that?




No. Once it is gone, you cannot add steel back.

That being said, I do remember reading about some that had rifles with very pitted barrels that would lap them (fill in the pits) with lead. That sounds like a lot of work to me, and I really wonder how long it would last before needing to be re-done. I would also wonder about how careful one would need to be so as not to create "humps" that might restrict and/or spike pressures when firing.

FWIW.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 4:59:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By rebel_rifle:

Originally Posted By tippman:
I do have some slight pitting is there any way to combat that?




No. Once it is gone, you cannot add steel back.

That being said, I do remember reading about some that had rifles with very pitted barrels that would lap them (fill in the pits) with lead. That sounds like a lot of work to me, and I really wonder how long it would last before needing to be re-done. I would also wonder about how careful one would need to be so as not to create "humps" that might restrict and/or spike pressures when firing.

FWIW.



I would think that after time and cleaning you would wear the lead out. Especially due to the solvents are built to combat lead fouling. The pits in mine are very minor so I am not going to go that far to fix them.

Even after I cleaned it by filling the bore the patches were still light gray but not bad. I guess my question should have been is there a better way to get the pits cleaned out rather than filling the barrel with solvent? Is the paste going to help that out any? Or should I just be happy with light gray?
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:06:49 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/10/2006 5:09:01 AM EDT by rebel_rifle]

Originally Posted By tippman:

I would think that after time and cleaning you would wear the lead out. Especially due to the solvents are built to combat lead fouling.



I agree. I would think it would be temporary at best.




The pits in mine are very minor so I am not going to go that far to fix them.


I agree as well.


Even after I cleaned it by filling the bore the patches were still light gray but not bad. I guess my question should have been is there a better way to get the pits cleaned out rather than filling the barrel with solvent? Is the paste going to help that out any? Or should I just be happy with light gray?


The paste should help, but you will have to try it first and see. Each rifle is different. Sometimes you just have to accept that it is gray and will continue to be. One other way to clean might be to get a Foul Out system. This is the one that uses electricity and solvent and basically uses reverse electro plating to remove copper, etc. You have to plug the bore and stand the rifle up and fill the bore with solvent. I have never used one but some do report it does work. Depending on how much time, money and effort you want to put into this, it may or may not be another option for you.

Good luck.
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 5:08:07 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/10/2006 6:15:52 AM EDT
Are Mosin-Nagants chrome lined? I have 3 of them and none ever get completely clean, always dark, but strong rifling nonehteless.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 12:06:43 AM EDT
If your bore is a little rough (or roughly manufactured), carbon will be in the low areas and slowly and consistently bleed out as you clean the bore. Each time you run a brush through the bore you stir up some more carbon.

It’ll take you forever to get white patches doing this.

Make a few passes with a brush and some solvent when you start cleaning (following the Windex/water treatment), then put the brush away.

Light gray patches are good enough.

Also, you don’t need to de-copper every 40 rounds unless you’ve got a really rough bore. And you really don’t want to be mixing different solvents in the bore.


Originally Posted By Jerret:
Are Mosin-Nagants chrome lined? I have 3 of them and none ever get completely clean, always dark, but strong rifling nonehteless.


Sounds like your bores might be frosted (or etched). Not a lot you can do about it other than keep it clean and not let it get any worse. Trying an abrasive such as J-B Bore Paste or Remington Bore Cleaner might help a little. Still, rifles with frosted bores can usually still shoot fine.
Link Posted: 1/11/2006 5:09:55 AM EDT
On the few frosted bores I have, I brush and patch the usual way (I like Butch's Bore Shine for a solvent). Then I finish with JB Bore Bright. After a number of these treatments, the cleaning gets easier and the fouling less and less. The JB seems to smooth out the roughness (polishing). I don't overdo it each cleaning, but a shoot, clean, shoot, clean regimen. Kinda like breaking in a new barrel. YMMV.

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