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Posted: 12/27/2005 7:48:50 PM EDT
Recently I have been going through my grandpa's old guns and I came across a J. Stevens A&T co. rifle in 28.30 caliber. Patent Apr 1794. Does anyone know anything about this weird rifle? There is NO information anywhere on the internet concerning this rifle and little info on J. Stevens rifles. What the heck is this thing worth? Thanks for your help, I curiously await a reply...

-jls7
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:19:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jls7:
Recently I have been going through my grandpa's old guns and I came across a J. Stevens A&T co. rifle in 28.30 caliber. Patent Apr 1794. Does anyone know anything about this weird rifle? There is NO information anywhere on the internet concerning this rifle and little info on J. Stevens rifles. What the heck is this thing worth? Thanks for your help, I curiously await a reply...

-jls7




Pictures will be 100 times more useful then any description you can give.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:26:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2005 9:27:11 PM EDT by Dace]
Well I found information on the ammunition.




.28-30 STEVENS – This is a fine original caliber, one made famous in its day by Stevens and also chambered by Winchester and the custom makers. Stevens often rebored and rebarrelled rifles to this caliber. The factory used 14” twist barrels, and this is the preferred twist. We also have 12” twist, but shooters are cautioned against using very heavy bullets in the Schuetzen calibers, since accuracy may not be all that was expected. The normal weight used in the past was 130-135 grains, and this is certainly a good place to start. Since this caliber will often shoot its best with about 12.5 grains of 4227, velocity may be close to 1600 fps. Such high velocity may be a great advantage, as the bullet is supersonic to 200 yards. When pushed to such velocities, the .28 has a very distinctive “crack” when fired. The barrels that we use are Douglas 7mm in 12 and 14 twist. It is best to figure on about a .284 groove diameter, but Douglas barrels vary due to being button rifled. The original brass uses large primers, but the new Bertram cases use only small primers, which should be borne in mind when ordering a capping tool. This long case must be annealed and full length sized when bought from Bertram, as their brass is really “basic”.

Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:34:57 PM EDT
More information.

Its really the J Stevens Arms and Tools Company which was sold to Savage in the 1920's.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:36:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/27/2005 9:37:03 PM EDT by Dace]
www.gunsamerica.com/2490/2490-random-1.htm

It also looks like the patent is not from 1794 but really 1894, they marked it incorrectly on purpose or accident. They all say 1794 so I assuming yours is a break action.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:37:52 PM EDT

Naming of the company - J. Stevens and Company 1867-1886. J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company, 1886-1915. J. Stevens Arms Company 1915-c.1940. Stevens c.1940-1991. The company was purchased by New England Westinghouse in 1915 and no Stevens guns were manufactured 1916-1919. It became a division of Savage Arms in 1920. Most Stevens firearms manufactured after 1948 carry both the Stevens and Savage names.
Link Posted: 12/27/2005 9:39:55 PM EDT
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