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Posted: 3/21/2006 1:05:19 PM EDT
really, that rail is a piece of junk. i screwed it in as tight as i could and now it's loose again a half-dozen shooting sessions later. i've heard of people using lock tite or glue to keep it tight, but the 10/22 owner's manual specifically warns against that because the glue could drip into the chamber or onto the hammer. should i go ahead and use something to tighten it up anyway? if so, what should i use?
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 1:21:18 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 1:24:35 PM EDT by PromptCritical]
Locktite is a good idea. If your concerned with dripping, here's what you do:

Disassemble the gun, remove the trigger assmbly, bolt stop pin (at the rear of the receiver), remove the bolt and handle/spring assembly (slide it all the way back and wiggle it out)

You should now have an empty receiver.
Screw the scope base on using locktite. Wipe out any excess that comes into the receiver.
Wait an hour or so for the locktite to set.
Check to make sure there is no locktite inside the receiver.
YOu could use this opportunity to thouroughly clean the bolt and receiver.
Reassemble the rifle and mount your scope.
Enjoy.

Also, since you have it taken apart, you might wanna replace the bolt stop pin with a plasic buffer. Mine is from BufferTech. It nearly eliminates the slam of the bolt when it cycles, and should prolong the life of the receiver (old 10/22's are known to have the holes deformed from the hammering the pin gets from the bolt. It also will reduce cycling noise in suppressed applications.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 1:42:13 PM EDT
btw - DONT over tighten the base screws.

From what I've read when I started getting into 10/22's, since the reciever is simply cast aluminum, it is very easy to strip the threads if you monkey down the screws.

.02
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 3:18:23 PM EDT
thanks for the info. would you recommend any specific type of locktite? apparently there are many varieties.
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 5:01:10 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/21/2006 5:04:46 PM EDT by PromptCritical]

Originally Posted By fossil_fuel:
thanks for the info. would you recommend any specific type of locktite? apparently there are many varieties.



As far as I know, there are three basic types:

Green is for light applications and can be removed fairly easily. Basically to stop parts from rattling apart. Good for rimfire apps.

Blue is for holdiong stuff together real tight and takes more effort to take apart. Basically good for centerfire stuff.

Red is the big daddy. Basically, if you think you might want to take it apart, don't use red. I hear the parts need a to be heated with a torch before they will come apart.

That's what I know, but I am anything but an expert...

ETA: From the horses mouth: LocTite website
Link Posted: 3/21/2006 6:53:10 PM EDT
Blue loc-tite. Apply to threads of screw to be inserted. INVERT rifle. Screw in screw. Set down and let loc-tite set up.

When ya invert it, ya don't need to strip out all the guts first. Ain't gravity grand?

Woody
Link Posted: 3/22/2006 7:19:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By WWoodworth:
Blue loc-tite. Apply to threads of screw to be inserted. INVERT rifle. Screw in screw. Set down and let loc-tite set up.


Yup.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 12:41:14 PM EDT
hmmm, i went to the store and bought some red lock-tite epoxy, because the blue epoxy was "for underwater applications". i also bought some "loc-tite superglue".

i should use the red epoxy and not the superglue, right? strangely, the tiny bottle of superglue cost twice as much as the huge tube of epoxy....
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 12:58:57 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fossil_fuel:
hmmm, i went to the store and bought some red lock-tite epoxy, because the blue epoxy was "for underwater applications". i also bought some "loc-tite superglue".

i should use the red epoxy and not the superglue, right? strangely, the tiny bottle of superglue cost twice as much as the huge tube of epoxy....



use blue loctite you will never i mean never get it off with red if you use red it will be permantley bonded and you will probally have to redrill and tap the reciever if you ever had to replace the base or what not ...in other words..take it back and get the blue

also degrease the parts first
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 5:29:39 PM EDT
Everything bolted onto my firearms gets blue loc-tite. It's just extra insurance. Stuff always likes to come loose when you're miles away from the proper tool and you just started having fun.
Link Posted: 3/24/2006 9:45:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By fossil_fuel:
hmmm, i went to the store and bought some red lock-tite epoxy, because the blue epoxy was "for underwater applications". i also bought some "loc-tite superglue".

i should use the red epoxy and not the superglue, right? strangely, the tiny bottle of superglue cost twice as much as the huge tube of epoxy....



Nyet, nyet. Red ees not your friend!! Blue, blue, blue. Well, if you ever want to think about getting that rail back off!


Woody
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 4:54:55 AM EDT
If I may disagree with everyone - if that scope rail is coming loose, you have ALREADY stippred the aluminum so no amount of loc-anything will fix it. You said it yourself: "i screwed it in as tight as i could"

Bad idea. What you have to do now is fix what you broke and that involves driling and tapping the holes out to the next larger size... I believe they come with #6 screws, so you have to tap the holes to #8x32. This is the ONLY thing that will give you a permanent fix.

The recommended torque for those screws is only 20 INCH pounds. That means 'barely snug'. And the use of blue loc tite at that time will give you a semi-permanent installation. I also recommend since you have to do it anyway, that you upgrade your rail to a Weaver T09.. they are cheap, standard weaver rail size and larger than factory.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 7:27:01 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Markbo:
If I may disagree with everyone - if that scope rail is coming loose, you have ALREADY stippred the aluminum so no amount of loc-anything will fix it. You said it yourself: "i screwed it in as tight as i could"

Bad idea. What you have to do now is fix what you broke and that involves driling and tapping the holes out to the next larger size... I believe they come with #6 screws, so you have to tap the holes to #8x32. This is the ONLY thing that will give you a permanent fix.

The recommended torque for those screws is only 20 INCH pounds. That means 'barely snug'. And the use of blue loc tite at that time will give you a semi-permanent installation. I also recommend since you have to do it anyway, that you upgrade your rail to a Weaver T09.. they are cheap, standard weaver rail size and larger than factory.



I was thinking the same thing. Mine are just barely snug w/ blue loctite and they hold fine. FWIW, get a In/lb torque wrench so you don't overtighten. ALSO, if you have a smaller ft/lbs. wrench, just convert feet to inches. Check your local auto parts store, I think small in/lb wrenches are pretty inexpensive.

I blue loctite everything on my 10/22, a tiny bottle of loc-tite will last along time.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 4:00:23 PM EDT
so the screws may be stripped because i overtightened them and then they loosened, and now i have to drill new holes in my reciever?
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 4:52:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/28/2006 4:57:55 PM EDT by RRA-A2]

Originally Posted By fossil_fuel:
so the screws may be stripped because i overtightened them and then they loosened, and now i have to drill new holes in my reciever?



Take the scope rail off and look in the holes. Do they look stripped out? Do you see any threads?
You won't know for sure until you look.
Link Posted: 3/28/2006 5:45:34 PM EDT
Yes. I am willing to bet you the price of a scope base.

I think you will still be able to see threads, but you can tell easily by removing the scope base, inserting one of the screws and trying to screw it down. If it keeps on turning, it's stripped.

Link Posted: 3/29/2006 12:27:24 AM EDT
If they are stripped, you could always use JB Weld to hold it together.
Link Posted: 3/29/2006 5:23:28 AM EDT
If you're worried about drilling and tapping, take it to a local machine shop and see if they can do it for you. I'm sure they have all the tools needed. It shouldnt cost much either since it's relatively simply to do.

Buy the new screws ahead of time and take them with you to the shop, that way they know what they're working with and don't tap it wrong. While you're at it, get a Weaver T09 base (about $10) and take it with you.
They can enlarge the holes in the base also.

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